Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

citiboi27610

Residential Development next to Urban Transit

6 posts in this topic

I currently live in Miami, and I wondering what measures have to be taken to build a quality residential building next to an urband trasit system as such as the Miami Metrorail. The biggest problem is obviously the sound. Would a parking deck block enough of the sound? How viable of an option is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I currently live in Miami, and I wondering what measures have to be taken to build a quality residential building next to an urband trasit system as such as the Miami Metrorail. The biggest problem is obviously the sound. Would a parking deck block enough of the sound? How viable of an option is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could have sound proofing to block the sound. Parking decks might do it. But if the demand is high enough, people will live there anyway. Transit is not going to be successful without a lot of residential nearby to use it. Charlotte's is not as good as it could be, but its a good start in the right direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A parking deck would likely produce more noise than the rail station!

A wall is ugly, impedes access, and did I mention is ugly?

The best measure to reduce noise for residents would be to install soundproof glass windows. A friend of mine lived in a dorm at Rutgers University, right next to a commuter rail station. With the soundproof windows we couldn't hear the trains (the whistles could be heard very softly though), or much from the traffic on the streets below.

Here's a pic of that RU dorm

NewBrunswickStationNJ.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just use a quieter form of transit in those areas, like a monorail instead of light/commuter rail. Or at least use it to connect to larger hubs in "less residential" areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A coworker told me that he was disappointed to see Boston's Washington Street elevated segment of the Orange Line taken down because the first train of the morning was his alarm clock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.