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Which Mayoral candidate would be best for the Nashville urban environment

Who is the best candidate for the Urban environment   21 members have voted

  1. 2. Which candidate has the best vision for Nashville

    • David Briley
      5
    • Bob Clement
      3
    • Buck Dozier
      4
    • Howard Gentry
      6
    • Dave Pelton
      0
    • Other
      3

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7 posts in this topic

Try to stick with the urban issues here and not turn it into a political debate and please do not slam any of the candidates just because you dont like the person. I am trying to get an idea of what we think of these candidates as it relates to the urban environment and the future of the downtown area. Consider issues such as mass transit, growth of the population of Nashville, tourism, homelessness, etc.

If there is another candidate, let us know who you would like to see run.

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I didn't know most of them. So I didn't vote.

I know a little about Clement and I have met Briley several times. I am totally unimpressed by Briley. He is full of platitudes and has never made an original proposals (as far as I know). He has gotten this far solely on his family name and friends in the local NSH media. I found it ironic that he called for "bold" leadership. I guess even he thinks somebody else should be mayor.

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From what I have heard all are in favor of the CC and Dozier wants it to happen sooner rather than later. David Briley is in favor only if tax payers do not pay for it. Thats about all I have. If anyone can shed more light, that would be great.

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Do any of the candidates take a stand on limiting the role of government in urban development? There is the convention center, of course. More subtle, but just as intrusive is the large role public housing plays. I would vote for any candidate who subjects any government development to three questions:

1. Is there a compelling reason that government must provide this service rather than private industry?

2. How much does it benefit people?

3. What does it cost?

The convention center fails question #1 since there is already a privately run convention center at opry mills. My guess is that public housing fares poorly in answering questions 2 and 3, especially if you include the lost development opportunities as a cost. This isn't about always being against government, but simply wanting the most bang for the buck. My guess is that a dollar spent on Head Start results in better jobs and fewer crimes than a dollar spent on public housing. (For some reason, affordable housing advocates seem to have no interest in measuring costs and benefits.) For an article from the City Journal on the effect of public housing on urban development, see: http://daily.nysun.com/Repository/getFiles...&ID=Ar00700

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Do any of the candidates take a stand on limiting the role of government in urban development? There is the convention center, of course. More subtle, but just as intrusive is the large role public housing plays. I would vote for any candidate who subjects any government development to three questions:

1. Is there a compelling reason that government must provide this service rather than private industry?

2. How much does it benefit people?

3. What does it cost?

The convention center fails question #1 since there is already a privately run convention center at opry mills. My guess is that public housing fares poorly in answering questions 2 and 3, especially if you include the lost development opportunities as a cost. This isn't about always being against government, but simply wanting the most bang for the buck. My guess is that a dollar spent on Head Start results in better jobs and fewer crimes than a dollar spent on public housing. (For some reason, affordable housing advocates seem to have no interest in measuring costs and benefits.) For an article from the City Journal on the effect of public housing on urban development, see:

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