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smeagolsfree

Green Roofs sprouting in Nashville

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I have had to take a few classes on green building and green roofs. One problem that has never been brought up that has started to intrigue me is what to do with historic buildings.

Do we alter a roof on an historic building to accomodate a green roof or would this be considered altering the facade of a building which would result in delisting from the historic register?

I still have not formed an opinion on this issue (although some of you have read my previous posts that show I am very pro-preservation) and was just wondering if anyone had ideas on this issue...

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It seems to me that green roofs should become very attractive for condo and apartment construction. With lower air conditioning bills, and green space (gardens in the sky) that can be enjoyed by all, I see many jumping on this bandwagon. Also, I see it becoming standard fair for government buildings as well. This is something I hope continues to catch on and grow in popularity.

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Hmm...historic buildings....well, I think keeping the historic status is more important than having a green roof. I mean, it's not THAT important! I do think in new buildings, it's a benefit for residents and they can enjoy their own private park. Do we currently have any green roofs, what about the building without the finished top?

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I would bet that many older or historic buildings would benefit from green roofs. It is not really notible from the ground except for the trees maybe, and would probably look more like a rooftop garden. I would love to see more in Nashville.

I think it would be a selling point for any condo development that has green roofs as well.

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Are bugs a problem with green roofs?

Also, is there a plan to make the roof of the new convention center a green roof?

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I think green roofs are excellent and hope this trend picks up in Nashville. However, from a design view, I don't think retro-fitting them onto existing buildings is very feasible. These rooftop gardens can add (depending on size of roof/garden) anywhere from a few, to a few dozen tons of weight to a building. Without proper support it could seriously jeopardize the integrity of a building.

But as far as new buildings, it should be a common practice. Why not throw a few solar panels/wind turbines on top as well!

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