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krazeeboi

Innovative metro areas in the South

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I mentioned a video on the New Carolina (SC Council on Competitiveness) website of a presentation by David Barkley and Mark Henry, Professors of Applied Economics & Statistics at Clemson University, entitled "Innovative Metropolitan Areas in the South: How Competitive are South Carolina

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I think the percent without a high school diploma is pretty sad. Not many with a college degree either.

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Well, do you really need a high school diploma or college degree to farm in the upstate? I thought all you needed was a pair of orange overalls.

Just Kidding, but it was nice to see that USC and Columbia are doing quite well in a few of those categories. I would really like to see that information from maybe twenty years ago so that we could compare to really see how our state is doing at diversifying the economy.

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That is an interesting statistic. I can't really think of any logical reasons why this could be the was it is in the Upstate. I do know that a lot of people from my hometown graduated HS and college, but moved to Columbia, Charleston, or somewhere out of state.

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Well, do you really need a high school diploma or college degree to farm in the upstate? I thought all you needed was a pair of orange overalls.

Just Kidding, but it was nice to see that USC and Columbia are doing quite well in a few of those categories. I would really like to see that information from maybe twenty years ago so that we could compare to really see how our state is doing at diversifying the economy.

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I'm sure you guys know this, but some types of farming require pretty advanced techniques and skills, and college degrees. I'm thinking of vineyards off the top of my head, but pretty sure the same is true of most commercial farms as well, like rice and soy which are common in SC.

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I'm suprised Columbia is doing so well when it comes to education, especially as compared to Augusta and Greenville--I figured it would be higher, just not that much higher.

I'm sure you guys know this, but some types of farming require pretty advanced techniques and skills, and college degrees. I'm thinking of vineyards off the top of my head, but pretty sure the same is true of most commercial farms as well, like rice and soy which are common in SC.

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Columbia has a very large educated population. It's just the norm for the area. Keep in mind that both USC and SC State are very close to the metro, as well as Benedict, Allen, Midlands Tech, etc. Lexington, and Richland district 2 have some of the best public schools in the state. Columbia, and Richland County in particular have a very well educated population one of the top 50 in the country to be exact! Not too much of a surprise but then again I grew up there.

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Its good to see a foundation that is for the advancement of the south carolina economy. You have to realize that south carolina will never pass places like virginia , n.c., texas in r & d, and tech, and things like that. All things considered s.c. is a small state, so i think given the size of the state that it is playing up its strengths and doing an o.k. job with things like innovista and icar, its still not exactly what i want to see but its a good start.

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I don't think this has anything to do with the size of the state, but rather a lack of leadership historically to make this state competitive in the scientific and technological industries. North Carolina and Virginia weren't always as big as they are now.

Table 13 surprises me.

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Yep. we have had some poor leadership. Also Anderson school district 1 is among the top public schools in the state. That is where i went and they have a great education system in place.

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I think everyone should check out the INNOVENTURE concerence held annually in Greenville. It is a big event and attracts business professionals from around the Southeast. It is great to be a part of such a growing region! :shades:

Here are some very encouraging observations by some who attended this year's conference.

Also held in Greenville, the annual InnoVision Technology Awards provide a great platform to showcase this area's best innovations. :shades:

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That's definitely something needed in SC. Thanks for providing the link, Skyliner.

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Here's an article in The State highlighting the benefits of InnoVenture. However, the article highlighted a downside: despite the popularity of InnoVenture, no SC companies will present at the first Southeast Venture Conference, set for Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 in Cary, NC. Only two in-state companies submitted applications to present at the conference, said Eric Gregg, publisher of TechJournal South. Organizers want a representation of companies from across the Southeast, Gregg said, but neither of the SC companies was considered "venture-backable."

Columbia intellectual-property attorney Reb Thomas said the lack of SC businesses presenting at the Southeast conference is not good. SC companies should be capable of presenting, he said, but some are just not ready yet. Gregg said the low number of applicants from South Carolina might reflect a need to do a better job of marketing the regional conference.

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Here is a small piece on today's GreenvilleOnline.com, relating to the future of innovation in South Carolina-based businesses. $50 Million will be used for the purpose of promoting and aiding innovative business growth here.

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Here is a small piece on today's GreenvilleOnline.com, relating to the future of innovation in South Carolina-based businesses. $50 Million will be used for the purpose of promoting and aiding innovative business growth here.

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^I'm digging the signage for the building.

The State has a good article about the conference in today's edition. It appears as though the conference is going on the road, which will give our state some nice exposure.

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Here is a unique innovation coming from SC. Apparently a researcher at Clemson University was awarded a grant to continue his study "of how to produce synthetic spider silk that could be used to repair the human body." This sounds very interesting. :thumbsup:

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I feel some comfort in knowing that my hometown is at the bottom of every list. 30 years from now I can return to Sumter, and it should look the exact same! :thumbsup:

seriously though, I'd like to reiterate what someone said earlier: The Pee Dee offers nothing for a young, educated person. It really is sad, I couldn't move back even if I wanted to. It's great that the upstate and the Charlotte metro are growing economically, but the Pee Dee is really being left behind.

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I feel some comfort in knowing that my hometown is at the bottom of every list. 30 years from now I can return to Sumter, and it should look the exact same! :thumbsup:

seriously though, I'd like to reiterate what someone said earlier: The Pee Dee offers nothing for a young, educated person. It really is sad, I couldn't move back even if I wanted to. It's great that the upstate and the Charlotte metro are growing economically, but the Pee Dee is really being left behind.

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The second annual Food For Thought conference in Greenville will take place on April 28-30 this year. The conference will once again bring exciting names from the world of successful entrepreneurs, including:

  • Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, founders of Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream

  • Mike McCurry, the former White House Press Secretary under President Clinton

  • Jessica Jackley Flannery, founder of Kiva, the first online micro-lending marketplace for the world's working poor

  • Chef Grant Achatz, recognized as one of the most innovative chefs in America

Other contributors will be announced later this month.

This three-day conference, held annually in Greenville, South Carolina, brings together some of the country's leading entrepreneurs, innovators, chefs and thought leaders. Founded by Joe Erwin, himself an entrepreneur, politician and food enthusiast, Food For Thought is a fully experiential event designed to inspire dialogue and debate among an intimate group of attendees.

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Wow, I'd forgotten all about this topic.

I wonder how the latest figures are looking for the state's metros in terms of R&D expenditures, patents, etc.?

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The Food For Thought conference is currently underway in Greenville. On Tuesday Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield spoke to an "invitation-only" crowd of 80 people at the Wyche Pavilion in downtown. More information

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