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Do NC Laws hurt Charlotte in Recruiting Business?


monsoon

Do NC Laws hurt Charlotte in Recruiting Business?  

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  1. 1. Do NC Laws hurt Charlotte in Recruiting Business?

    • Yes
      8
    • No
      8


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There wasn't much in the local news this loss. It makes it seem that Charlotte's ability to offer incentives as compared to other states is fairly limited due to NC law. I would have thought they would have pulled the stops out for 2000 very high paying jobs. It's especially disappointing that Charlotte once had a fairly well known nuclear design group here and they were even sought out in dealing with decomissioning old soviet reactors like Chernoybl.

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People will say that offering "incentives" to attract businesses is bad. Frankly, I think we should throw "the kitchen sink" at prospective relocations. Why? It's means more to the economy than how many jobs are being created... It means more people contributing to our economy; more shoppers, more taxpayers...more potential for entrepenaurship once newcomers arrive. The problem, as I see it, is do we have the munipical will to increase taxes and fees to supply the services needed for the new residents? Do we have the collective vision to make the decisions today that will help our economy tomorrow?

Ultimately, this is a battle between "city-states" and Charlotte and NC needs to be prepared to do "battle" with other states and regions for these companies and their employees, not because of the companies themselves but because of the residual benefits of having these companies here.

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It was really not the lack of incentives, it was the fact that Charlotte's labor pool had practically zero engineers available to staff such a center. They would of had to recruit heavily to bring people in here.

I have a friend who works for Shaw Engineering here in Charlotte, which is basically the nuclear engineering group that metro was refering to. They are the ones that bought the Duke Nuclear Engineering spinoff. They are trying to grow their local office by a couple hundred engineers, but they are having a VERY hard time finding qualified people to fill the positions.

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It was really not the lack of incentives, it was the fact that Charlotte's labor pool had practically zero engineers available to staff such a center. They would of had to recruit heavily to bring people in here.

I have a friend who works for Shaw Engineering here in Charlotte, which is basically the nuclear engineering group that metro was refering to. They are the ones that bought the Duke Nuclear Engineering spinoff. They are trying to grow their local office by a couple hundred engineers, but they are having a VERY hard time finding qualified people to fill the positions.

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Tech companies locate to RTP because of the state tax breaks they get for going into that park and people move there to get those jobs. This proposal was for 2000 engineers and presumably they will move to get these jobs. Interestingly, Microsoft built it's largest non-sales technical location in the USA, outside Washington state, here in Charlotte and it employs more people than this. They had no problem finding 'smart' personnel.

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Honestly, this is the first time in quite a while that I've heard about anywhere in North Carolina losing out when it comes to bidding with incentives to bring high-profile, high-paying employment. I'm certainly missing more than a few other cases, but it seems to me that North Carolina is often much more liberal than other states with our incentives packages, and we win the incentives war more often than not.

But, regardless of how attractive NC is for businesses, we will lose some deals.

Sounds like having the Westinghouse campus in western Pennsylvania will be a good thing for the company too, as it is much closer to HQ.

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Tech companies locate to RTP because of the state tax breaks they get for going into that park and people move there to get those jobs. This proposal was for 2000 engineers and presumably they will move to get these jobs. Interestingly, Microsoft built it's largest non-sales technical location in the USA, outside Washington state, here in Charlotte and it employs more people than this. They had no problem finding 'smart' personnel.
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I thought Microsoft in Charlotte was basically a call center. Do they have large numbers of computer engineers working at Arrowood? If so, what do they develop here?

Through personal experience, when I worked in Chicago I had to call a few times to get high level support for some applications such as Exchange and every time I was connected to someone in Charlotte. This isn't a call center that you typically reach when calling for support and their response is to make sure the computer is plugged in. They do reference themselves and others in the center as engineers however but I suppose the term of "software engineer" for instance isn't exactly the traditional engineer considered by most.

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....

If it is strictly a matter of cost then why would firms even consider RTP? Land in the park is quite expensive and cannot be given away since land sales are how the park is financed. Why not go to a place like Forsyth where land is given away along with tax abatements and lots of other goodies?

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Well why don't they? It is because the of the tax advantages that ARE in RTP. You somehow seem to miss that. It doesn't matter if other parts of the state can enact them or not. The fact of the matter is they don't have them and that is why I can correctly say that RTP attracts huges numbers of technology firms is because of the tax advantage.
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