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Richmonopoly

Louisville - The Region...

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I may possibly accept a job in Louisville next summer. I'm pumped about the option, but I am very unaware of the region.

When I think Louisville I think of a largely caucasian populous. What does Louisville look like in term of diversity? Culture? Is there a large African-American population in the region? How about the schools?

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I may possibly accept a job in Louisville next summer. I'm pumped about the option, but I am very unaware of the region.

When I think Louisville I think of a largely caucasian populous. What does Louisville look like in term of diversity? Culture? Is there a large African-American population in the region? How about the schools?

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Louisville has a sizable African American community with about 20 percent of the city being black. The citys Hispanic community is undercounted (like most American cities right now) and many leaders have estimated that 8-10 percent of the city is now Hispanic.

Even after unified government took hold in 2003, African Americans retained control of 25% of the council seats.

Louisville is right now having slow, stable growth. We are experiencing a net in migration from many northern cities and with a stable economy, we are also garnering the attention of international immigrants.

You asked about the schools, and I will assume you meant the public school system. Thankfully, Jefferson County Public Schools are considered to be one of the nations better large urban school districts. In any district as large as ours you will find bad schools, however, the schools are generally of good quality. Like anywhere, it depends on how much you and your child put into the educational opportunities provided. JCPS has a fantastic magnet school program and several beautiful old school buildings.

Louisville also has a very strong Catholic influence, and because of this, there are a plethora of private Catholic schools from which to choose as well.

As for universities, just in case you wanted to know that, we are obviously the location for the University of Louisville which is growing by leaps and bounds. What only 8 years ago was a moribund campus is now experiencing academic and athletic growth that it hasn't seen in decades. UofL is now a destination school in Kentucky, not just the commuter school for Louisville.

In addition to UofL, Louisville is home to Bellarmine, a private Catholic university that is also growing, Spalding University which is very small and near downtown, Sullivan University, which is one of America's top culinary school and helps to explain why Louisville has a dining scene that is on par with cities three times it's size, as well as Jefferson Community Collge which is downtown and building itself a small campus. On the Indiana side you'll also find a branch of Indiana University.

You also asked about the arts in Louisville, which I consider one of the main highlights of Louisville. This city has an arts scene that also could compete with cities in tiers higher than us. The theatre scene in Louisville is very strong, as witnesed by our yearly hosting of the Festival of New American Plays. Google it if you're interested. This years line up sounds fantastic.

Besides the strong theatre scene, Louisville also boasts a huge number of art galleries in downtown, along Bardstown Road, and Frankfort Avenue.

Louisville, in my opinion, is a good fit for someone who apprecites the arts, a laid back city with slow but stable growth, historic neighborhoods, amazing Olmstedian parks, good nightlife that lasts until 4am, and a palate for eclectic and especially fine dining.

Louisville certainly is lacking in some important areas too, and these also need to be considered. The city lacks a profesional sports scene, the national retail mix in Louisville is extremely substandard for a city of it's size, there seems to be a "good ole boy" mentality to Kentucky state politics, and Louisville really is an "old money" city (Not that it matters to a typical city dweller, but if you're looking to break into the upper eschelons of Louisville society, you better have a good Louisville name attached to you) Also, the city has had a lower than average educational attainment level, and this has negatively impacted the citys economic growth. This is changing, but Louisville is certianly not growing like a Nashville or an Indianapolis.

Louisville has a definite funky, homegrown artsy feel to it and you can tell that it isn't one of those cities where it was artificially created, but was just the citys natural vibe. I moved to Louisville after living in California and Oregon and I adopted Louisville as my hometown. I now live in Chicago and I seriously cannot wait until I get to move back down there.

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