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wolverine

NEW North Quad Design Unveiled

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Finally, the new design for North Quad is out, and it's beautiful! North Quad will replace the 100 year old Freize Building. IMO, this is a superb replacement. Just in case anyone has doubts, this is a Robert Stern building. They DO NOT use false materials. This isn't going to be some plastic look alike just because it is classical looking. It will be collegiate gothic with real brick and limestone. Anyway here's the pics!

Images are too large to post so go here:

http://www.ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=3060

Can't wait till construction starts!

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I agree, I think it looks pretty good, any timeline on construction for this?

Also, I like how some universities have gone this route. I was at Notre Dame where they had a new building built within the last 5 years in which the materials & artitechure blended within the rest of the university. Whereas with my alma mater, WMU, the new buildings look like cheap crap.

Overall nice addition!

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I saw this in either the Free Press of News, on Sunday, and was pleasantly surprised, to say the leaset. VERY nice. Can someone see if they can find the article that was done on this on Sunday explaining the aspects of the development?

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Thanks for the update.

The plans do look great and that will be a great residential boost for that side of Central Campus.

That building is quite large (part 6 story, part 10 story) but the overall effect is not nearly as imposing as South Quad.

South Quad is a leftover building from the Henry Horner Homes on Chicago's west side. Not that there is anything wrong with that.

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Timeless design. Do I see the west entrance and surrounding facade of the Frieze building preserved in one of those renderings?

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Sadly no, but I'm curious as to why it wasn't. The renderings show a lower building bordering State Street. It has pilasters (very vertical facade) which is kind of a gesture towards the old building. I almost think they could have integrated the old facade in. However, the Frieze building had really high ceilings 14 feet maybe?, And it rose 3 stories including the ground/basement level. So I'm wondering if it would have not fit correctly.

Oh and here is the article:

http://www.ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=3061

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Question, I'm not familiar with the area that much and would like to know what street bind this block?

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The building is bound by Huron, State and Washington. Also, although I incorrectly placed the historic facade on the building's west side, there is some historic preservation on the north side. Per the text of the article...

"Along Huron Street, the preserved facade of the Carnegie Library is incorporated into the residential building."

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The outside looks great. It looks staggering in the drawings. Frieze is pretty large building and there are rather large buildings surronding it so I wonder if it is going to be as striking as the renderings make the building out to be. Also, is it the same color as the school of Public Policy. That building kind of looks out of place.

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I read about this. How can a 300,000 sf dormitory cost $175,000,000? That's almost $600/sf. Anyone have more details? That's more expensive than research or medical related facilities per square foot. :huh:

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The article on The University Record says its 360,000 sf.... Which still puts it at around $490/sq ft. My guess its so high because of all the 'common' spaces, including the TV Studios (3), Media Gateway, Media Intensive classrooms and the cyber cafe...

I'm guessing those studios and such will be decked out with some expensive technology... Just my guess

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Also, probably because it's being constructed in collegiate gothic architecture by a well known architect. Brick and limestone doesn't come cheap you know. :)

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It just seems a bit outlandish for a dormitory, considering much of the college's money comes from the State (we taxpayers). And at a time when the State has such budgetary problems. Reminds me of the outlandishly ornate supreme court building in Lansing, that we paid for. Love the architecture though.

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I didn't know the state was paying for this, rather it would be generated through housing revenues within the University. Even if the state does, I doubt they would pay more than what they would for the original design which was significantly cheaper. According to the budget update request to the regents, the design change and increase in quality of materials were the main reasons for a higher cost.

Reguardless, I'd rather see more money put forth for good design, rather than a mundane piece of garbage, or cheap knockoff. We've lost the monumentalism and class of our institutional buildings today.

I'm happy with the product we have here, even if it is more expensive. I mean, I already paid for it, so I'm not complaining.

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GRDad: Given the lackluster support of the University by the State of Michigan over the past 25 years, and the fact that several units of the University are essentially private (receiving no State support at all, such as the Law School), and, as Wolverine suggested, the costs will be recouped through the housing system, I really don't think there are grounds for complaint.

Frankly, given the University of Michigan's contribution to the Michigan economy, and the vital importance of the University (and the other universities in the state system) to the overall well-being of that economy, I think that the neglect of that asset borders on lunacy.

What has happened in the interim is that U-M increasingly is relying on its alumni and students (or more accurately, their parents) to fill the gap, along with the federal government (which is, I believe, the largest single fund source for the University). If that means that the dorms will be designed by Robert A.M. Stern instead of Joe Nobody, more power to the 'U'. The only way that universities the quality of the University of Michigan can maintain that quality is to act boldly, even when the idiots at the State Capitol may gripe.

Bravo, RAM Stern, and I look forward to seeing North Quad as it rises over the unlamented ashes of the Frieze Building.

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Dave, is it that State of Michigan has been neglectful, or that Michigan has given UofM what it's always wanted, and that's more autonomy? I get from your tone that you believe it's the former; it's been my understanding that it's more the latter.

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LMichigan: Well, it's been a while since I have lived in Michigan, but it is my impression that the State has cut funding to Michigan (and the other state universities) in real dollar terms for the past few decades. However, as a result of the fact that state funding is now less important as a source overall funding, Michigan has more autonomy. I would love to see Michigan have even more autonomy, though given the Constitution, that would be difficult. So, I would answer "yes" to both of your points.

I would note that MSU as well, has been underfunded. However, that doesn't stop the delta-minuses in the Legislature from wanting to exert their power over the universities. I seem to recall a few years back a move to try to limit the percentage of out-of-state students. That would devestate Michigan in particular, which is about 1/3 out-of-state in the undergraduate population.

I know that the State has had some awful budgetary years, but it seems as if higher education is always shorted, at least in comparison with other programs. I also am da-- tired of people whining about tuition being high -- as someone who is paying for a private university tuition for his son, U-M in-state tuition is an amazing bargain (as is MSU in-state tuition).

I would finally note that we have exactly the same problem in California. The University of California at Berkeley is comparable to Michigan in its size, quality and prestige, but has terrible facilities that are aging fast and need mucho bucks for earthquake retrofitting. Unfortunately, there is no money in the budget for Berkeley, and the alumni network has been woefully neglected. UCLA has somewhat similar problems, but the facilities are in far better shape and there are some very rich Southern Californians who have stepped up with contributions. Much of the bond money recently approved for the University of California will instead go to the newer, less prestigous campuses. That's fine, but the state risks the erosion of its crown jewel.

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State funding for U of M is minimal. I'm curious to find the numbers. I took a class on the history of U of M, annd the last figure I heard was that 10% of U of M's operating budget came from the state. I've heard as low as 5% even. This is just operating, not research or capital. Most building projects are paid for by the students through tuition or by donations. Don't quote me on any of this, I never saw this in writing. But I can say the state has helped here and there on a few building projects I have witnessed. For example, the renovation of the LSA building got some state funding. (not a whole lot though)

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Michigan's three top tier universities have always been given a level of autonomy not found in other states, which is why I question the idea that the is neglecting them. In fact, these universities are comparable to many incorporate cities in the level of self-governance they are given. And, UofM and Michigan have built some pretty fine campuses, and pretty fine programs considering how much home rule they are given, so I really do question the idea that universities are given a harder time here than in most other states. In fact, I'd say it's quite the opposite, especially considering how quickly the tax base is drying up. Michigan has quite a few short comings and problems, the universities and how they are handled isn't one of them, IMO. In fact, our largest problem is retaining all of the great students we ship out of state. Michigan's had a fine tradition of producing great minds in their universities, only later for them to leave for what they see as greener pastures.

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Michigan's three top tier universities have always been given a level of autonomy not found in other states, which is why I question the idea that the is neglecting them. In fact, these universities are comparable to many incorporate cities in the level of self-governance they are given. And, UofM and Michigan have built some pretty fine campuses, and pretty fine programs considering how much home rule they are given, so I really do question the idea that universities are given a harder time here than in most other states. In fact, I'd say it's quite the opposite, especially considering how quickly the tax base is drying up. Michigan has quite a few short comings and problems, the universities and how they are handled isn't one of them, IMO. In fact, our largest problem is retaining all of the great students we ship out of state. Michigan's had a fine tradition of producing great minds in their universities, only later for them to leave for what they see as greener pastures.

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GRDad: Given the lackluster support of the University by the State of Michigan over the past 25 years, and the fact that several units of the University are essentially private (receiving no State support at all, such as the Law School), and, as Wolverine suggested, the costs will be recouped through the housing system, I really don't think there are grounds for complaint.

Frankly, given the University of Michigan's contribution to the Michigan economy, and the vital importance of the University (and the other universities in the state system) to the overall well-being of that economy, I think that the neglect of that asset borders on lunacy.

What has happened in the interim is that U-M increasingly is relying on its alumni and students (or more accurately, their parents) to fill the gap, along with the federal government (which is, I believe, the largest single fund source for the University). If that means that the dorms will be designed by Robert A.M. Stern instead of Joe Nobody, more power to the 'U'. The only way that universities the quality of the University of Michigan can maintain that quality is to act boldly, even when the idiots at the State Capitol may gripe.

Bravo, RAM Stern, and I look forward to seeing North Quad as it rises over the unlamented ashes of the Frieze Building.

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Here's a site plan. I edited out all the unnecessary stuff around it.

nqsite.jpg

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I am sure they will be able to recoup there cost on this one, you know they won't have to

raise room and board or any thing like that. Heck I don't think I have seen a finer steward

of TAX dollars than the U of M.

just a thought maybe they could recycle all of those solid gold toilets and bidets

from Sadams old palaces.

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