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NYguy

835 ft Santiago Calatrava tower

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Skyline in the making?

manhattan.jpg

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Resembling some of Mr. Calatrava's sculptures, but on a titanic scale of 835 feet, the tower would rise over the East River at South and Fletcher Streets, near the South Street Seaport and the Brooklyn Bridge. The developer, Frank J. Sciame, estimated its completion in 2006 or 2007.

Perhaps not every preservationist would agree that a structure reaching 1,000 feet at the tip of its mast would complement a nearby precinct of 19th-century countinghouses.

But Madelyn Wils, the chairwoman of the Lower Manhattan community board, said she did not think that the structure's height would be controversial particularly given its slenderness and transparency. "It's such an unusual building, it's worth taking a chance on," she said.

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That is an unusual building. It is very thin for such a tall tower. When will it begin construction?

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LOL!! I like the first picture!! I'll believe that people will go to the beach off Manhatten because they do it in Chicago and used to have one off the North End of Boston, but palm trees? That's silly! :D LOL!!

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:blink: ( I mean that in a good way, and bad way)

I like this building because of height, and I kinda like the design.. But im not that sure when I take another look...

What will its use be?

btw thats a very small beach.. :huh:

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What will its use be?

From the NY Times...

Thinking Outside Box, Architect Comes Up With Cubes

By DAVID W. DUNLAP

March 3, 2004 - New York Times

Fresh from causing a sensation with his avian design for the World Trade Center transportation hub, the architect and artist Santiago Calatrava is ready to make a second startling mark on the Lower Manhattan skyline with a residential tower unlike any New York has ever seen.

It would take the form of an offset stack of 45-foot glass cubes, a dozen in all, each intended to house only one or two families.

The developer, Frank J. Sciame, estimated its completion in 2006 or 2007.

It will be very expensive to build - just how expensive the developer will not say - and very expensive for prospective owners. But then again, Mr. Sciame said, "you only need between 12 and 24 interested parties in the entire world."

In an alternating pattern, four-story cubes would be cantilevered from a concrete core containing elevators, stairways, plumbing and electric lines. Alongside the cubes would be pairs of slender stabilizing spines, turning the entire composition into a gigantic truss. The top of one cube would serve as the terrace for the next cube up.

The cubes could be single dwellings of about 10,000 square feet, or divided. The building would also have an eight-story base that could house a museum or other cultural institution.

Though it would be among the tallest apartment towers in New York, 80 South Street would have only 175,000 square feet of space. Mr. Sciame said he was trying to configure it so that it could be built "as of right"; that is, within existing zoning regulations and without the need for discretionary city approvals and a full public land-use review.

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LOL!! I like the first picture!! I'll believe that people will go to the beach off Manhatten because they do it in Chicago and used to have one off the North End of Boston, but palm trees? That's silly! :D LOL!!

Battery Park City was a popular beach for a while, before Battery Park City was built. Most of the East River Olympic Village proposals include somesort of beach as well. I think we have global warming to thank for the proposed palm trees.

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Now that Ive seen the new renderings I really dont like it, I could never live in something like that, the views would be good, but I dont like the overall structure.. Its seems like if you pushed it, it would topple over, Id get too nervous when there was a high pressure wind ;)

btw you say it will be ''very expensive for prospect owners'', do you mean the contract buyers or the tenants? Doesnt all high-rise resedential buildings have to have at least 10% low cost affordable living space? My city does.. Does it apply in America too?

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Gee, I'm surprised. Usually Calatrava's civic works are beautiful and amazing.

But this is horrible. It's pods stuck on a radio tower. It would look so out of place, but I guess that is the idea i.e. to make a statement.

Oh Santiago, how disappointing! :(

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btw you say it will be ''very expensive for prospect owners'', do you mean the contract buyers or the tenants? Doesnt all high-rise resedential buildings have to have at least 10% low cost affordable living space? My city does.. Does it apply in America too?

Affordable housing rules are made at the local and state level in the US. I don't know what the specific rules are in New York state and city but I don't think they mandate specific rules for buildings.

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