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kayman

More government blaunders involving Katrina cleanup

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At this point with all the f***k ups Bush and his do gooder cronies have done to this whole contry as well has to the Big Easy thus far, I'm not suprised in the least. The only real help New Orleans is ever going to get is via charitable acts and for the people down there to do what they can in picking themselves up by the bootstraps and rebuilding. Why? Because the lesson that fatefull tempest , named Katrina, has taught us all or at least I, is don't ask Uncle Sam for help becuase you're never going to get it.

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^anyone else wonder why this story was run on Christmas Day, when all of seven people in the country are paying attention to the news?

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^anyone else wonder why this story was run on Christmas Day, when all of seven people in the country are paying attention to the news?

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Not defending Bush and his cronies, er administration; but as far as the Katrina debacle we can't lay blame completely on him. There is enough blame to hand to the officials in New Orleans and Louisianna as well. So if we're going to play the "pin the blame on" game, make sure you include them as well...

(making this point even though the article was mainly about FEMA and gov't contracts.)

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The fact that the city flooded lies with the federal government. The federal government built the levees and dykes in the city, entrusting the Army Corps of Engineers with that task. THe problems will only get worse in the future as the city continues to sink and the ocean continues to creep towards New Orleans because we have diverted the river into a concrete channel and all the sediment that created the delta and the land that New Orleans sits on continues to be dumped off of the continental shelf.

So, either we can continue to build up the dykes until New Orleans becomes an island of below sea level city surrounded by water, or we have to move the entire city northwestward.

The response was handled poorly by all levels of government. But when local and state government don't get the job done (let's face it, Louisiana is not known for clean politics), the federal government needs to step in and help.. especially when the federal government is responsible for the dykes that broke and flooded the city. The federal response was pitiful, plain and simple.

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The response was handled poorly by all levels of government. But when local and state government don't get the job done (let's face it, Louisiana is not known for clean politics), the federal government needs to step in and help.. especially when the federal government is responsible for the dykes that broke and flooded the city. The federal response was pitiful, plain and simple.

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The fact that the city flooded lies with the federal government. The federal government built the levees and dykes in the city, entrusting the Army Corps of Engineers with that task. THe problems will only get worse in the future as the city continues to sink and the ocean continues to creep towards New Orleans because we have diverted the river into a concrete channel and all the sediment that created the delta and the land that New Orleans sits on continues to be dumped off of the continental shelf.

So, either we can continue to build up the dykes until New Orleans becomes an island of below sea level city surrounded by water, or we have to move the entire city northwestward.

The response was handled poorly by all levels of government. But when local and state government don't get the job done (let's face it, Louisiana is not known for clean politics), the federal government needs to step in and help.. especially when the federal government is responsible for the dykes that broke and flooded the city. The federal response was pitiful, plain and simple.

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It is kind of a fool's game to rebuild NO anyway. Let people back in who want to invest their money, but federal dollars should be spent more wisely.

Weren't the levees supposed to be maintained by the local government? I didn't think the Corp handled maintenance on them.

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I guess one thing that amazes me the most, is haven't we learned anything from our past involvments with natural disasters? The response and planning should have been better on all levels of government after our "training sessions" with Andrew and Hugo just to name a few..

The Tsunami seemed to get quicker relief efforts from our gov't and they're half a world away..

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the levees and dykes were built and are maintained by the Army Corps of Engineers. The local government has very little to do with it.

If we're going to complain about spending federal dollars more wisely, then why not stop subsidizing other states and give each state back what they pay in in federal taxes. Minnesota only gets 69 cents back for every dollar it pays in while New Mexico gets $1.33...

Edit: It doesn't matter what level of government maintains them, anyway. They were only designed and funds were allocated for a category 3 storm. The federal government went cheap on New Orleans, and look what happened.

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I'm pretty sure the local govs were tasked with funding maintenance, but can't swear to it, so OK, the Corps maintains it.

Yup, they were designed for a Cat 3, but got hit with a little stronger (that's a point of contention, too). When you try and beat Mother Nature, Mother Nature wins. NO is a perfect example of this. Sooner or later, they'll get belted again. I don't want to pay for the folly of others.

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...add to that the century-old precedent that large-scale disaster relief is handled primarily by federal assets, and the fact that the mayor and governor had to resort to begging for federal help on television, and there is absolutely zero excuse for the feds taking nearly a week to mobilize.

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This is what happens when you have a hubristic C student president. I'd have a lot more respect for our president if he'd learn a little humility and maybe read a few books. Strong leaders can admit when they're wrong and still lead.

Captain Worley,

I understand if you don't want to pay for the folley of others. Nobody WANTS to pay for other people, but that won't stop us from doing it. And if we're going to federally subsidize land reclamation projects so that we can build large cities below sea level (even if it is for a large port), then we need to make the city safe from future floods caused by storms.

Initial investments may be higher, but it'll save money in the long run.

Don't you agree that if we're going to pay for this city, that we should do it right in order to reduce future risk? Louisiana has never had the money to pay for such large scale projects, and the situation is not going to improve with such poor investment in schools and infrastructure. This is simply ridiculous coming from a state that has such rich resources... but we're not doing the country favors by standing around pointing fingers and not getting anything done.

We had a similar thing happen here in 1997 when an entire region (Red River Valley) was flooded by a 1000 year flood event. The federal, state, and local governments responded immediately by evacuating people. The city rebuilt and large investments were made to build the dykes to withstand a flood even worse than the 1997 flood. When the 6th largest flood in 110 years hit in April 2006, residents of the city watched the high water flow by from their dry homes.

You can say "They shouldn't have built there"... shoulda coulda woulda.. the fact is.. that river valley has some of the richest soil in the world for farming and provides a large chunk of the sugar that goes into your twinkies and hohos.

But instead of coming together and responding quickly and overwhelming the system with aide and help, we stood around and pointed fingers and played politics, and thousands of people are still living in government trailers a year and a half later. That's just not acceptable.

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This is what happens when you have a hubristic C student president. I'd have a lot more respect for our president if he'd learn a little humility and maybe read a few books. Strong leaders can admit when they're wrong and still lead.

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Or..

just make all newly constructed homes be 10 feet off the ground. You can have garages and patios and porches at ground level, but the rest has to be up. Also, make storm shutters mandatory.

It would also be a good idea to start a registry of the disabled or elderly or those without transportation so that in the event of a mandatory evacuation, they can be evacuated. This wouldn't be any harder than running school buses out to pick them up.

Also, have an emergency evacuation plan for the public transit system so that normal routes can drop off at a central location where buses can be waiting to take people out of the city.

I know homes on stilts are not that attractive, but there are designs out there that work. A home 10 feet off hte ground with storm shutters would likely withstand a storm stronger than Katrina with only minimal damage. We could make incentives by providing a discount on insurance for homes that are hurricane protection certified or something.

Also, they should work on permanently evacuating the lowest lying areas of the city and turn these areas into parkland that can take up slack during flooding events. It provides recreational opportunities and keeps the city safer.

These are ideas that will cost money, but I think it would be best for the city. Moving the city to Baton Rouge wouldn't be feasible.

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Not an actual move of the city, but just let the low lying areas return to nature, which is to say don't rebuild on them, clean them up and let vegetation and nature reign again. New Orleans as a city will lose more land area, and therefore population, which it will recover from by growing more dense over time. And Baton Rouge will grow more than it might otherwise have done naturally while this process happens, nothing wrong with that, following a similar path that Houston and Galveston did. I find this to be sensible, more so than building a strong levee system for a place that at some point is going to return to the sea entirely.

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Or..

just make all newly constructed homes be 10 feet off the ground. You can have garages and patios and porches at ground level, but the rest has to be up. Also, make storm shutters mandatory.

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Not an actual move of the city, but just let the low lying areas return to nature, which is to say don't rebuild on them, clean them up and let vegetation and nature reign again. New Orleans as a city will lose more land area, and therefore population, which it will recover from by growing more dense over time. And Baton Rouge will grow more than it might otherwise have done naturally while this process happens, nothing wrong with that, following a similar path that Houston and Galveston did. I find this to be sensible, more so than building a strong levee system for a place that at some point is going to return to the sea entirely.

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It is kind of a fool's game to rebuild NO anyway. Let people back in who want to invest their money, but federal dollars should be spent more wisely.

Weren't the levees supposed to be maintained by the local government? I didn't think the Corp handled maintenance on them.

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