Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

kayman

Birmingham Metro Economic Development

25 posts in this topic

America's 50 Hottest Cities

Among the top 10 finishers, San Antonio made the biggest jump, moving up from No. 11 last year to No. 5. Dallas and Birmingham each moved up five spots from last year.

Texas has five metros on the list, while Florida, North Carolina and Tennessee each had four cities. Two states

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Per capita income in the Birmingham-Hoover area climbed nearly 55 percent from $21,382 in 1994 to $33,067 in 2004, the 13th best growth rate in the country, according to a study by Larry Holt, director of research for the Birmingham Regional Chamber of Commerce.

There is good news and bad news. The good news is that for Birmingham its rapidly rising and is growing with some of the best cities economically in the nation. The bad news is that the major of the risings are not coming from technology or biotech-based jobs, but rather mainly from manufacturing industry via the auto makers. It's not totally a bad thing but we don't need to based our entire economic growth on this very unstable industry in this country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is good news and bad news. The good news is that for Birmingham its rapidly rising and is growing with some of the best cities economically in the nation. The bad news is that the major of the risings are not coming from technology or biotech-based jobs, but rather mainly from manufacturing industry via the auto makers. It's not totally a bad thing but we don't need to based our entire economic growth on this very unstable industry in this country.

That's very true, not many other cities have a strong, stable economy. I think Huntsville's is the only truely stable economy that could survive without car manufacturing. Decatur is pushing it. I don't know about other cities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

City has robust tech sector, says lawyer

According to technology lawyer, James C. Childs, he says Birmingham's technology sector has a very bright and robust future. He touts that we have a large advantage over other Southeastern cities due to the presence of UAB and Southern Research Institute. The only disadvantage he pointed out is the region's weak leadership and lack of tax incentives from the state or local governments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colonial to sell mall, office assets

Colonial Properties Trust will divest out of the retail and office market all together. They are realigning their portfolio towards residential properties and its growth. However, they will maintain mall management over their shopping malls that are sold to joint ventures, but if an investor isn't found for certain center then it is totally divested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colonial Announces that Brookwood and Alabaster are not part of the deal

Colonial Properties Trust announced that Colonial Brookwood Village and Colonial Promenade Alabaster is not going to be sold with the nationwide sale for office and retail properties. There are plans to for major investments in the upscale Brookwood center including a major expansion in additions to it current 2 new developments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SRI pushes for more growth, more partnerships in Secrist's line-up

Southern Research Institute (SRI) is to push for more growth in the region and more partnerships. The new CEO, Jack Secrist III, is pushing to make the SRI create more growth for the biotechnology and high tech sectors of the area's economy.

I see many great things for Birmingham and Central Alabama with such a strong research entity like SRI in the region. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Saks breakup job cuts to total 600

This is shameful how Birmingham is losing so many companies and the massive job losses left and right. Birmingham needs to get better leadership and better mayor with the election coming next year, and more regional cooperation amongst all the region's cities to make this a better and stronger place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Saks breakup job cuts to total 600

This is shameful how Birmingham is losing so many companies and the massive job losses left and right. Birmingham needs to get better leadership and better mayor with the election coming next year, and more regional cooperation amongst all the region's cities to make this a better and stronger place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Considering how many high-profile corporate losses metro Birmingham has suffered in recent years, it's pretty remarkable to see just how stable the economy is, with very low unemployment:

http://www2.dir.state.al.us/LAUS/LAUS_Metrorates.asp

Of additional interest is the increase in "civilian labor force" from November 2005 to November 2006

of about 11,000. It should also be noted that every metro area in the state enjoyed some increase.

Though an inexact correlation, the "civilian labor force" figure is roughly half of total metro population.

The news is even better for "urban" Birmingham fans. Jefferson County had been pretty stagnant in previous years, yet over 6,000 of that 11,000 metro-wide increase came from Jefferson County itself: http://www2.dir.state.al.us/LAUS/LAUSCNTY.asp

I spent today in the Birmingham area, just for fun. I drove to Trussville for the first time in years,

and was amazed at the amount of growth up there, especially that new shopping center.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Considering how many high-profile corporate losses metro Birmingham has suffered in recent years, it's pretty remarkable to see just how stable the economy is, with very low unemployment:

http://www2.dir.state.al.us/LAUS/LAUS_Metrorates.asp

Of additional interest is the increase in "civilian labor force" from November 2005 to November 2006

of about 11,000. It should also be noted that every metro area in the state enjoyed some increase.

Though an inexact correlation, the "civilian labor force" figure is roughly half of total metro population.

The news is even better for "urban" Birmingham fans. Jefferson County had been pretty stagnant in previous years, yet over 6,000 of that 11,000 metro-wide increase came from Jefferson County itself: http://www2.dir.state.al.us/LAUS/LAUSCNTY.asp

I spent today in the Birmingham area, just for fun. I drove to Trussville for the first time in years,

and was amazed at the amount of growth up there, especially that new shopping center.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some key indicators for the 12-month period ending Sept. 30, 2006:

Jeff. Co. Retail Sales- Up 6.0%

Jeff. Co. Hotel Revenue- Up 17.8%

Jeff. Co. Occupational Tax- Up 4.5%

Birmingham Retail Sales- Up 2.4%

Birmingham Occupational Tax- Up 6.7%

Area Housing Sales- Up 14.1%

Airport Passengers Boarded- Up 0.2%

:thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the state legislators with connections to US Steel says that they are "strongly considering" both Bessemer and Birmingham for a $45-million plant. Given US Steel's history in the city, it's likely one of the two will land the big deal. It is expected, at least initially, to create about 100 new jobs with a starting salary of about $50,000 annually.

http://www.al.com/news/birminghamnews/inde....xml&coll=2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bank merger adds jobs in city

Regions seems to be adding even more jobs to the area. They will be hold a job fair to fill more positions on May 1. I was concerned at first because another merger had meant another local-based name was disappearing from the area's roster. However, In the long run this has been a good thing considering Regions in now a Top 10 financial institution and has added more jobs to the region.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Unemployment is so low that I've heard some companies are actually having trouble filling positions. Hopefully that will encourage more and more people to move here knowing that companies are REALLY needing people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm really beginning to think that people are vastly underestimating the Birmingham area's, or the whole state for that matter, ability to grow. Of course estimates are never exact, but, neither is the census, so we may never know the actual growth counts. All of this growth, I hope, will promote infill in the larger urban areas, and cause a slower sprawl rate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Jefferson County Commission finally did something right. They approved a tax-break incentives deal so as to encourage US Steel to invest in a $27-million expansion of their Fairfield Works site in Jefferson County. It's only expected to result in the creation of about 15 jobs or so, but it shows that the Commission is capable of working together for the good of the county and region.

Now if only US Steel will decide to build that new $45-million plant in Birmingham, that would be great. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like Bessemer has come up with about $1.25 million in incentives to try to land this steel plant. Hopefully Birmingham has taken similar measures to try to match that. Personally, it's not going to be a huge loss if Bessemer were to get it. It'd be a loss for the people of North Birmingham, but not the region as a whole. Bessemer needs the development just about as much as Birmingham. It'd just be nice if our principal city, Birmingham, were able to get another big plant to help revitalize the city and its economy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like Bessemer has won the plant. Again, this isn't bad for Birmingham. As a matter of fact, it's great for Birmingham's west side. Bessemer is actually very much a part of Birmingham's urban fabric. A healthy, vibrant Bessemer means a healtier, more vibrant Birmingham. The plant is estimated to bring in about $23-million annually to the city of Bessemer. Bessemer certainly appears to have hit a major growth spurt with all that's going on there...

* $90-million in the coming years spent on Alabama Adventure

* $38-million spent on the new Bessemer Courthouse

* $45-million now on the US Steel Plant

... And that doesn't even consider all of the basic residential and commercial development going on out that way. Great job, Bessemer. Keep it up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AT&T is looking to expand in the region, looking to add 400 new jobs

AT&T is going to submit a request this week to Birmingham and Jeffco to invest $2 million into expanding their operations in the region. They are being mum on what exactly the jobs will inquire, but it will have the pay scale of the $20-30K range annually. The agreements with Birmingham and Jeffco for them both to provide the company $200K each in incentives to allow this expansion.

AT&T Alabama, formerly Bellsouth Alabama, Inc., has currently 5,500 employees in this region.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it will be great for Birmingham. I'm glad Birmingham is getting a little attention at least from some of those corporations that have bought out local companies. Hopefully Wachovia, AT&T, etc. will continue to have a major presence here and even expand their operations here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AT&T Inc. said Tuesday it will begin work immediately on a $3.5 million project to renovate space at the company's downtown office tower into a customer care center with 367 new employees providing technical support for Internet operations.

On Tuesday, Birmingham and Jefferson County officials voted unanimously to provide $200,000 each in incentives for the San Antonio-based telecommunications giant. The Alabama Development Office earlier agreed to support the project with another $200,000.

AT&T expects the call center operation to have an annual payroll of $8.5 million. City officials project the center will generate $81,000 a year in occupational taxes and have an annual economic impact of $100,000.

I don't understand why incentives are needed to bring jobs with an average annual salary of $23,000.00

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Report: Birmingham to gain lab jobs by 2018

Birmingham is in line to benefit from a projected upswell in clinical laboratory jobs over the next decade, industry experts say.

The U.S. Department of Labor predicts a combined 108,000 clinical technologist and technician jobs will come open due to job growth and replacement needs by 2018. Those jobs include “rapid growth in private diagnostic labs, as well as in physicians’ offices,” according to a recent U.S. News and World Report list of the top 50 careers for the next 10 years.

Birmingham’s robust health care community and the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Clinical and Laboratory Science/Medical Technology Program could be a winning job-growth combination, according to health care professor John Lowe. Lowe, director of the Simmons College graduate program in health care administration in Boston, said the local area might benefit from an expected increase in lab work as baby boomers demand more medical services and technology becomes more affordable.

“Those things are going to expand,” Lowe said.

Clinical laboratory jobs include testing and analyzing body fluids and cells to help physicians make diagnosis. They also conduct blood and drug tests. In the near future, those laboratory jobs will also include greater genetics testing as scientists gain a greater understanding of DNA makeup, according to Janelle Chiasera, director of Clinical Laboratory Sciences at UAB.

Chiasera said up to 70 percent of decisions regarding patient diagnosis and treatment are based on laboratory results. She said clinical laboratory students entering the local market with bachelor and master’s degrees aren’t oversaturating the local work force. Instead of having to move away from Birmingham to find jobs, she said those graduates are being absorbed by health care facilities as demand for those services grows.

“The market tends to get flooded, but that’s not the case here,” Chiasera said. “We expect that the overall growth trend in the health care sector will continue to progress rapidly as aging baby boomers place new and increased demands on health care providers.”

Simmons College’s Lowe said the “x” factor for the field is at what level DNA work will increase. He predicts every hospital will have a genetics counselor on staff within five years.

As technology improves and costs decline, genetics testing will play a greater role in not only treatment but prevention, Chiasara said.

“As we get information from the genome, it will be important to the way we treat people,” Chiasera said. “The profession is currently experiencing a 10 percent vacancy rate, and 13 percent of the current professionals are likely to retire in the next five years, creating widespread opportunities for jobs across the country.”

Job growth in the clinical laboratory is expected to be faster than average with the number of job opportunities rising by about 16 percent. The fastest job growth will come from clinical, pathology and physician-office laboratories.

Lowe said lab technology is becoming more ubiquitous particularly among private physician practices, which are adding services as equipment costs decline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.