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cophead567

So i'm doing the downtown walking tour............

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so i'm doing the downtown walking tour, i check out a couple sites at a time and try and take a picture of each one. a little confused right off the bat. sites 4 and 5 are described as:

4. Raleigh Banking and Trust Building (1913-1936)

5 West Hargett Street

This is the only tall office building in the city which has undergone an

architectural change of style. Its first three floors were built in 1913 with classical

detailing. The upper eight floors were added in 1928-29 in a more streamline

style. The lower floors were remodeled in 1935-36 to complete the Art Moderne

look.

5. Masonic Temple (1907)

133 Fayetteville Street Mall

Designed by Charles McMillan, this downtown landmark is perhaps the state's

oldest surviving steel-reinforced concrete building. Indiana limestone clads its

first three floors, with tan brick and decorative terra-cotta covering the upper

stories.

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The freemasons used to be divided in the area -- "regular" masons and Prince Hall freemasonry, an offshoot created by "unintentional racial segregation" (wikipedia's words, not mine).

The building at 133 F Street was the "regular" masonic temple. They used to have a ballroom on the sixth floor, which had a "seventh floor" balcony, even though the elevator only goes to 6. I used to work in that office in a previous job. Empire Properties now have their office there.

I don't know too much about their history, but there are two lodges on Glenwood -- one just northwest of the Wade Ave intersection, and one near the Glen Eden intersection.

The lodge on Blount in the second picture, in the then heart of the African-American community in Raleigh, was of the Prince Hall variety.

The Raleigh Banking and Trust Building (1913-1936), at 5 *West* Hargett Street has the CVS drug store in its ground floor F Street face. East and West designations for buildings start at Fayetville Street south of Capitol Square, and the remnants of Halifax Street north of the sqaure.

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Couldn't help noticing that most addresses on the tour still said XXX Fayetteville Street "Mall"

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webguys got it right. Count the floors again in the first pic and you get 7, not 12. The CVS buidling, if you look closely, does indeed change styles from the 3rd to the 4th floor.

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sounds straight to me, i guess stumbling upon the second pic got me thinking to much.

as far as the "west" thing and the number of floors, uuuhhh maybe i need to catch up on sleep, haha

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The walking tour needs to be updated. I know the description gets it right, but the old CC is no more. Visitor Information is at the State History Museum, not 301 North Blount Street (35). The Heilig-Levine Building at 137 South Wilmington Street has not housed a furniture store in years.

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The walking tour needs to be updated. I know the description gets it right, but the old CC is no more. Visitor Information is at the State History Museum, not 301 North Blount Street (35). The Heilig-Levine Building at 137 South Wilmington Street has not housed a furniture store in years.

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