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gs3

Great spots for photos

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Here is a thread where we can exchange ideas for great locations for shooting photos in and around Greenville. All the forumers seem to come up with new locations and angles on a regular basis. If you want to share, here's a place for it.

Below are two spots that could be fantastic with a wide angle. I may have to invest in one before our photo walk.

From the corner of University Ridge and Howe Street. Imagine if these two images were one with a wide angle.

DSC00740.jpg

DSC00741.jpg

Here is another great view from the steps of the Baptist church (the name escapes me) across Pleasantburg from Greenville Tech. Again, imagine these two together as one with a wide angle.

DSC00743.jpg

DSC00744.jpg

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If anyone is able to take either of those shots with a wide-angle lens, it would make for a great poster. :thumbsup:

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I've tried both with a wider angle (18mm to 24mm or so). I don't even want to know how miniscule the buildings would look from these spots at 10mm. Trust me, these telephoto zoom shots look best. :thumbsup:

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I've tried both with a wider angle (18mm to 24mm or so). I don't even want to know how miniscule the buildings would look from these spots at 10mm. Trust me, these telephoto zoom shots look best. :thumbsup:

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You could take the photos and stitch them together to make a panorama with stitching software. I do this quite often.

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Unfortunately, no. The only thing you can do to get an equivalent image with a wider angle lens is get closer to the subject and somehow try to maintain the same perspective as closely as possible.

There are a couple of separate categories of lenses suited to different magnifications of an image: Zoom and Fixed. The zoom lenses do just what they sound like they do...they allow the photographer to change the magnification of the image across a range without changing lenses.

  • Zoom Magnification Lenses:
    • Ultra-Wide Zoom (lenses that zoom from around 10mm up to around 35mm)

    • Standard Zoom (lenses that zoom through about 70mm or 100mm)

    • Telephoto Zoom (lenses that zoom to 100mm +)

    • Fixed Magnification Lenses:

      • Wide Angle

      • Telephoto

      • Super Telephoto

      To further complicate matters, each lens will provide a different magnification on a 35mm SLR than it would on most low-end (read: affordable) DSLR cameras due to the fact that the format of the image sensor on most DSLRs isn't exactly a 1:1 proportion to that of a frame of 35mm film. Because of this, most manufacturers offer "digital-specific" or "digital-optimal" lenses suited better for (or exclusively for) these DSLRs with the small format sensors.

      Some of the higher end (read: cost-prohibitive) DSLR cameras have a image sensor that is at 1:1 ratio with 35mm film; therefore, the same lens on both these DSLRs and on a 35mm camera should produce the same image.

      I can suggest a good book (CLICK HERE) which covers this about as well as I've seen it explained anywhere.

      You could take the photos and stitch them together to make a panorama with stitching software. I do this quite often.

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Stitching works, but you have to be careful with your exposure, etc. You need to make sure you have a tripod, and that you allow some overlap of the images. I was actually looking at stitching your images together, but there is no overlap.

I have little Nikon S1 that has a Panorama mode with overlays that assist with stitching in programs such as Photoshop. However, I prefer to use my Nikon DSLR with a fixed 50mm lens on a tripod.

The picture below was taken at the Lake Robinson Park...

337307084_2dc14cf22b.jpg

This was created from six shots. I had some problems with exposure in the left-most frame because I was shooting almost into the sun and got some lens glare (even with a hood.) You can see a larger version of this image here.

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Stitching works, but you have to be careful with your exposure, etc. You need to make sure you have a tripod, and that you allow some overlap of the images. I was actually looking at stitching your images together, but there is no overlap.

I have little Nikon S1 that has a Panorama mode with overlays that assist with stitching in programs such as Photoshop. However, I prefer to use my Nikon DSLR with a fixed 50mm lens on a tripod.

The picture below was taken at the Lake Robinson Park...

337307084_2dc14cf22b.jpg

This was created from six shots. I had some problems with exposure in the left-most frame because I was shooting almost into the sun and got some lens glare (even with a hood.) You can see a larger version of this image here.

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OK....learning here. Thanks for the information RT. :thumbsup: I think I'll check that book out. Looks like a great roadmap to help me learn.

Beowulf I love your Lake Robinson photo. :thumbsup:

So if I went back to these spots and zoomed, with overlap in my photos, I could stitch then. I'm assuming minimal overlap? Since it would only be two photos and not a multiple of 4 or 5, exposure should be easier.....these photos would be more linear than panoramic, so that would work in my favor on exposure?

Other than stitching, as RT notes, I guess it would just be tiny buildings on the horizon with a wide angle.

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For future consideration I am using the current beta of Photoshop CS3 and the stitching features has improved significantly. It was able to automatically put together about 4 photos I took in from of my house during the last ice storm nicely with out the blend troubles I was having in CS2.

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I have never actually tried to stitch anything in CS2. How does one do that?

I use 2 other programs, one of which came with my Canon S60 camera.

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I have never actually tried to stitch anything in CS2. How does one do that?

I use 2 other programs, one of which came with my Canon S60 camera.

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I guess I'm just doing it the hard way. I haven't played with the Photomerge feature very much, so I tend to stitch manually.

I you do choose the Photomerge option, I would suggest that you check the "Keep as Layers" option in the preview panel. That way you can adjust the exposure of each frame manually for a better blend.

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So if I went back to these spots and zoomed, with overlap in my photos, I could stitch then. I'm assuming minimal overlap? Since it would only be two photos and not a multiple of 4 or 5, exposure should be easier.....these photos would be more linear than panoramic, so that would work in my favor on exposure?

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GP, I took both your images, and with a little creativity, manage to stitch them together. Now the challenge for everyone is to figure out what I omitted in the gap between the two images!

346945129_a4d282c6c2.jpg

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Wow! Thanks! I don't see anything missing. :dontknow:

So here is my next question on this subject. If I shoot multiples (4 or 5 shots) vs just two and have more overlap it will stitch better. But if I'm shooting these buildings so close, with their vertical and horizontal lines, won't this be challenging to stitch? Seems like trees or water would be the easier subjects to stitch.

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This is one I did of PNC Park in July 2005.

346976456_fc970f4f24.jpg

Buildings can be done as well. I take pictures of houses, as well as interior photos, and stitch them.

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Wow! Thanks! I don't see anything missing. :dontknow:

So here is my next question on this subject. If I shoot multiples (4 or 5 shots) vs just two and have more overlap it will stitch better. But if I'm shooting these buildings so close, with their vertical and horizontal lines, won't this be challenging to stitch? Seems like trees or water would be the easier subjects to stitch.

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Yeah, it might be a problem. I think there are trade-offs either way. I'd experiment and see which works best.

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This is another great spot for photography (just outside Greenville though). Twin Falls is located in Pickens County at these coordinates:

N35 00 32.1 W82 49 17.8

I shot this about 9:00 this morning...

twin_falls.jpg

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Even better! :) I see you love the long exposures. I'm assuming you have a pretty good camera, am I correct in guessing a DSLR?

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