Jump to content

Triangle in the national media


Recommended Posts

The fact that Raleigh is on this list and Boston is not shows that the list is a complete joke.

Raleigh is not friendly to walking outside of the downtown core and a few other areas. Here are the cities between 250,000 and 600,000 ranked by the percentage of pedestrian commuters. Raleigh is, unsurprisingly, next to last.

Carfree Census Database Search Results

I'm with transitman on this one. And I certainly think public transportation should play a role in that, since the ability to walk to where you're going is exponentially greater when there's good public transit. Having said that, I can see Raleigh (though I'm sure they really mean The Triangle as a whole) based more on trails (as others have mentioned) and the ideal climate. Try walking in Boston in the days following a Nor'easter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Now, I am no fan of Martha Stewart but she was on a live interview from Cary this morning with Matt Lauer and the Today Show. She showed one of her homes (built with KB homes) and to be honest, it was quite nice and looked urban for Cary since the lots were small and compacted She kept pointing to the little things the house has that make it nice. (big closets, high ceilings, big bedrooms, nice baths, connecting bungalow )

You could tell she had talking points on the Triangle. Matt Lauer asked her about costs which started in the low $200K's and he asked about the housing bubble and was she worried. She said no, especially with Cary "where here in the triangle, 65 people move her a day". She mentioned the triangle many times but not Raleigh, Durham or Chapel Hill. My guess her talking points from a Cary-ite said talk about Cary and the Triangle. Cary's push to become it own city.

Again, no fan of Martha here but good for Cary and the Triangle. I could picture many people in more expensive places Goggling

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now, I am no fan of Martha Stewart but she was on a live interview from Cary this morning with Matt Lauer and the Today Show. She showed one of her homes (built with KB homes) and to be honest, it was quite nice and looked urban for Cary since the lots were small and compacted She kept pointing to the little things the house has that make it nice. (big closets, high ceilings, big bedrooms, nice baths, connecting bungalow )

You could tell she had talking points on the Triangle. Matt Lauer asked her about costs which started in the low $200K's and he asked about the housing bubble and was she worried. She said no, especially with Cary "where here in the triangle, 65 people move her a day". She mentioned the triangle many times but not Raleigh, Durham or Chapel Hill. My guess her talking points from a Cary-ite said talk about Cary and the Triangle. Cary's push to become it own city.

Again, no fan of Martha here but good for Cary and the Triangle. I could picture many people in more expensive places Goggling

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I live right next to these. They are surrounded by Morrisville. I am unsure why they call it Cary. This is quite misleading. The area is located to the East of Harris Teeter on Davis. To the South of Keystone Park, to the North of Morriville Carpenter Rd. and to the West of where I live. All encompassing a 5-6 sq mi area. All those areas I named were Morrisville. Am I missing something.

BTW, I just came back from trying to drive by and view some of the homes. Unfortunately, you have to go on the tour to see them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

It ultimately comes down to education and cost. Raleigh/Durham fit this criteria very well. Hopefully some of the large business moves come to fruition soon including the Fidelity and Roche deals. I think there is also a Pfizer deal in the works as well.

Also Bristol-Myers-Squibb is still out there too.

Edited by DanRNC
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, and they're ranked separately.

I remember seeing the "Raleigh-Durham" metro listed among several notable business and "quality of life" lists. It's great to see each getting its own reputation.

Welcome to the board, durham_rtp!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Durham and Raleigh are now separated as stated in the Forbes magazine because the US Census consider these as two separate MSAs now.

Raleigh is number two for the third straight year and in the top three for the fourth straight year. Why we can't acheive number one I don't know why. The business costs are the reason this year but it is something different every year. I'll take number two every year but one year as number 1 would be nice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, it is interesing, but if you look at it on a map, it sort of looks like Raleigh-Cary-Apex is one cluster and Durham-Chapel Hill-Carrboro is another.

Also, consider how DT Durham and DT Raleigh are so far from one another. Sure, their city limits meet up at one point, but there's a 45-minute gap between central business districts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, it is interesing, but if you look at it on a map, it sort of looks like Raleigh-Cary-Apex is one cluster and Durham-Chapel Hill-Carrboro is another.

Also, consider how DT Durham and DT Raleigh are so far from one another. Sure, their city limits meet up at one point, but there's a 45-minute gap between central business districts.

Actually the commute is 25 minutes,and 30 with traffic. It's ridiculous how they're split up though. Alot of people work in each others city.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.