andremurra

Statesboro - by Definition

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This topic will cover Statesboro by the Numbers (and letters): New statistical information, updated demographics and non-numeric research projects and studies regarding the Statesboro region. Hopefully as this topic develops, it will help offer a more comprehensive understanding of what Statesboro is, where it ranks, what its various assets are, and other non-numeric research findings concerning Statesboro and the region at large. These topics include the city, suburbs, neighboring communities, the region, its relationship with other cities and regions, and its role in the Coastal Georgia RDC area.

statesboro_map.png

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Statesboro MSA:

According to the US Census Bureau

Micropolitan Statistical Areas (United States)

Edited by andremurra

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If a micro reaches the 50,000 mark in its urban core, then it will become a metro. Otherwise it only means that Statesboros growth is weighted heavily in rural low density housing. I would think that given Statesboros apparant growth pattern (based on what I've read on this forum) that this situation would not be an issue.

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What issue? Im not saying that there is any issue, just that as Statesboro-Bulloch County continues grow, the Micro population will surpass Hinesvilles Metro population. According to projections, this will happen in about two years, and then Glynn will be next in about 7-10 years. According to the growth rate of Statesboro's urban core, it may remain an urban cluster for the 2010 census probably in the upper 30's-lower 40's, but by the 2020 census (according to projections), Im sure Statesboro will be reclassified as a Metro since the urban core will have surpassed 50,000. I did finally find a map of Statesboro's urban cluster and how it relates to the political boundaries. According to that map, and the current massive residential development that is occuring in areas adjacent to the urban cluster's boundaries, I think that those boundaries will expand significantly for 2010 as well as the several areas inside the urban cluster's boundaries that are getting more dense. I'll try to post a photo of the map if I can figure out how to cut it off of a PDF file. Perhaps, Ill get ghetto with it and just snap a photo of the PDF file with my digital camera - haha.

Edited by andremurra

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You can just pit "print screen" and then paste it in to PhotoShop or MS Paint or some other graphics program via the "Edit > Paste" window.

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You can just pit "print screen" and then paste it in to PhotoShop or MS Paint or some other graphics program via the "Edit > Paste" window.

Thanks Spartan - Ill try that again... it wouldnt do it earliar. Maybe Ill try it from another computer. Oh wow - it actually worked this time. Im adding all the major streets to the map now so you can get a better idea of the layout of Statesboro. I am going to add all current and upcoming development projects to the map as well to illustrate where the growth is occuring to get an idea of where the boundaries of the urban cluster may expand for the 2010 census.

Edited by andremurra

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Statesboro Urban-Cluster

statesborourbanclustereo4.jpg

Here is a photo of the Statesboro urban cluster. The red shade is the outline of Statesboro's city limits. The white color is the outline of the urban cluster. Judging by the looks of it and exactly how many residential/commercial projects have taken place since this map was drawn, the urban cluster will surely expand significantly since this map was based from the 2000 census.

statesborourbancluster1ls8.jpg

I edited the map - added all the major streets. Ill use this map to specify where the new developments are going. Enjoy.

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Don't know how the interstate between Augusta and Savannah will affect Statesboro, but that's something that will need to be watched closely. Many of the smaller towns that thrive on through traffic will be affected by a faster commute (but bye bye speed traps -- hear that Statesboro, Waynesboro, and Sardis??).

Statesboro really is affected by traffic up and down, and unless the new parkway has appropriate off and on ramps, it will suffer economically (and depend more on the university for income -- something to be avoided relying on one source of cash flow). Residents need to prepare for the change of migration patterns and incomes.

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Don't know how the interstate between Augusta and Savannah will affect Statesboro, but that's something that will need to be watched closely. Many of the smaller towns that thrive on through traffic will be affected by a faster commute (but bye bye speed traps -- hear that Statesboro, Waynesboro, and Sardis??).

Statesboro really is affected by traffic up and down, and unless the new parkway has appropriate off and on ramps, it will suffer economically (and depend more on the university for income -- something to be avoided relying on one source of cash flow). Residents need to prepare for the change of migration patterns and incomes.

While I do think Statesboro desperately needs to have an interstate connection, I dont think that the new interstate taking the Hwy 21 Route will have any major impact on Statesboro other than losing the "opportunity" for more quality expansion. The proposed route travels with the eastern leg of the Savannah River Parkway and connects to I-95. The western leg of the SRP will still be there and will still connect to I-16. I also dont think that we will lose any industry or that Walmart will close its 2.5 million sq ft distribution center just because a slight migration pattern will change. The only change in migration that I foresee will be that Hwy 21 travelers will have a faster commute. Hwy 25 travelers will also have a faster commute, especially since the entire western leg has been 4-laned. I think that the parkway will increase traffic into Statesboro even if it takes the 21 route, simply because the only difference will be increased speeds from Millen to Augusta. I foresee a stronger relationship with Sylvania as development will start to expand northward out of Statesboro creeping towards the interstate connections.

Statesboro has a booming real estate market, thriving industry, booming commercial sector, four colleges/universities, one of the country's best recreation systems and is a competitive medical hub. Georgia Southern University pumps nearly $2million into the local economy daily. I think Statesboro has reached the point to where its more of a migration draw than it is a community benefited from the highways that run though it. Dont get me wrong though, I think the interstate will have a very good impact on the community.

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The map above illustrates what I mean about Statesboro depends on through traffic. It's whole existence is centered around two roadways. Once traffic is diverted from the main plan, those businesses (and residents) will experience the same problems when a mall moves in and strips downtown of it's traffic.

When that parkway finally goes "gold", migration patterns will change the demographics of areas that depend on through traffic. Since Statesboro doesn't have enough industry to survive a major disruption of migration, it'll limp along, with more money thrown at whatever development projects to "fix" what some well know GA engineers always forget (read: higher sales and property taxes). The only folks to really profit from it are those who will "fix" problems, which tend to be costlier as they're predators trying to steal from taxpayers.

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We are just going to have to disagree because obviously you dont know anything about Statesboro. First you are assuming that the city only has two major routes just because a census map illustrating the urban cluster only shows two routes. Secondly, Statesboro doesnt thrive from its through traffic. Like I said earliar, Statesboro is the attraction these days. Its "existense" is also 203 years old, way before those US Highways were built. It was also the world market for Sea Island Cotton in the late 1800's early 1900's, so its a city that has been industrialized for over 100 years.

Statesboro's major traffic flow lies on Hwy 80 through the Statesboro-Savannah Corridor to the east - a route that cant be served by the potential I-3. Statesboro's second most traveled route is Hwy 67 which is not even shown on the map which expresses even more how much you need to do your homework before discussing this city. Hwy 67 also serves as a route through the Statesboro-Savannah corridor, so again it wont be affected. The vast majority of Statesboro migration traffic comes from the surounding region's residents who come specifically to do business in Statesboro. We do have a lot of through travelers, but they are a minority compared to the commuters.

Statesboro did lose its nickname as Tourist City when I-95 was built, becoming the new Boston/New York to South Florida route. But lets get serious, this is Augusta were talking, not New York to Miami which I-95 serves. There will be minimal traffic migration changes. Furthermore, Statesboro is a direct stop on the Savannah to Atlanta route which Im considering is a route that will only strengthen in time. I cant really say that I see a lot of potential in a Savannah to Knoxville route, that is, if the expressway makes it past Augusta into the Georgia Mountains given that the expressway is built at all. Even so, it takes years to build an expressway, and by the time it is built, Statesboro will have grown substantially more.

Additionally, designing the Savannah River Parkway with two legs, one connecting to I-95 (east leg) and one connecting to I-16 (west leg) serves two logistical purposes. Just because the eastern leg may become slightly more convenient (overpasses, no traffic lights, no major exits), no one is going to take the eastern leg if their family, or factory, or business still sits on the western leg - "oh yeah, lets drive to Savannah and take I-16 back to Statesboro so we can skip those traffic lights". I dont think so.

No one here is worried about I-3, and neither should we be. The route doesnt change Statesboro's appeal. It doesnt change the fact that we have 20,000 college students who travel regularly, or that we have one of the top 100 hospitals in the country, or that "Splash in the Boro" has attracted over 2-million tourists since it opened in 2004, or that our football team (with the exception of last year) is the best in the country, or that our annual retail/sales tops $1-billion, or that we have one of the best industrial parks in the country, or that we are the anchor city in the S4 Technology Corridor, and so and so on. We all know that Max Burns introduced the bill to get his rinky-dink town on the map so maybe they might eventually get a real grocery store or even a steakhouse.

However, I do agree that we need a route, perhaps a route that more benefits Georgia's economy rather than Sylvania's. But if the Augusta to Savannah route is built, it wont change the reason the western leg was built anymore than it will affect Statesboro's I-16 based industrial sector or the Statesboro-Savannah residential corridor.

Edited by andremurra
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Perhaps I've missed something, but when did I-3 all of a sudden get the green light? Also, if it does get built, who's to say that they won't route it near Statesboro to their benefit?

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Perhaps I've missed something, but when did I-3 all of a sudden get the green light? Also, if it does get built, who's to say that they won't route it near Statesboro to their benefit?

I-3 does not have the green light as far as I know. However, if it does, Augusta will finally be on the map as far as North-South logistics are concerned. Most Augustans are holding on to this hope. 'Boro resident's are also hoping that I-3 will be built if it directly connects Statesboro. We all know that Max Burns specifically wanted his 15,000-pop Screven County to directly benefit knowing how illogical it would be to skip the nearby booming 65,000-pop Statesboro/Bulloch. He even said so (virtually). Statesboro would love a connection to Augusta and Northeast Georgia or an alternate Atlanta route. The students would love it too and would feel safer driving home for the weekend - Again, they are not going to drive to Savannah then get on I-3 to drive up to Augusta - haha.

It would be awesome though if I-3 would connect to I-16 South of Statesboro at Hwy 67 & I-16 instead of crossing I-95, I-516 and intersecting with I-16 in Savannah. Imagine how much that infrustructre would cost. A connection to I-16 near Statesboro would be smarter because:

1. A direct connection will be made to a fast-growing market - Statesboro-GSU-Brooklet-Metter.

2. Making one interstate intersection will cost much less than making three.

3. I-16 already connects to Savannah (I-95, I-516, and Downtown) quite efficiently so the infrustructure is already there.

4. Fort Stewart (for whom the interstate 3 is named) will be quickly accessible via Hwy 67 through Pembroke to Hinesville. Max Burns lists Ft. Stewart as a reason for I-3, but they would have to travel South through Hinesville, then east toward to coast, to I-95, then travel North through Savannah's entire Southside, Midtown, Downtown traffic, then get off on I-3 North of Savannah heading north finally. If I-3 connected to I-16 at Hwy 67, Ft Stewart would simply have to exit from their North Gate, travel up through Pembroke to Hwy 67 straight to the beginning of I-3 - Just one straight-forward diection, North. Besides, my military family who reside in Augusta, drive south through Statesboro to access Fort Stewart via Hwy 67. They dont do all that crazy stuff, driving southeast to Savannah, then South to the exit, then east to Hinesville, then north through Hinesville to get to the South Gate.

5. Georgia Southern University, East Georgia College, and Ogeechee Technical College can send their students home more efficiently and safely.

6. More High-Tech industry will be attracted to the S4 Technology Corridor. Why would the state of Georgia invest the tens of millions of dollars into developing the S4 Technology Corridor then allow a new expressway to bypass the region. Not logical at all.

Edited by andremurra

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where would i find information on this S4 Tech Corridor, and possible routes for these proposed interstates?

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As of 2007, it's 25,583. This is a 12.71% increase since 2000.

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Oh ok. Thanks for clearing that up. I've not had a chance to really dig into the forum yet, but is there a University here sparking this growth? What's the reason for the drastic change?

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Oh ok. Thanks for clearing that up. I've not had a chance to really dig into the forum yet, but is there a University here sparking this growth? What's the reason for the drastic change?

Georgia Southern University is one of the biggest reasons for the town's population being what it is. GSU has ~16,500 students on campus here.

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Ahh... this is the University my cousin was at! I didn't realize it. Does this place have a good news paper? How is the law enforcement there?

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Ahh... this is the University my cousin was at! I didn't realize it. Does this place have a good news paper? How is the law enforcement there?

Can't say much about the law enforcement here, but we do have the Statesboro Herald, whose website looks very nice for a paper with a circulation of its size.

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Seems as though the Census changed some of their population figures from previous years for Statesboro/Bulloch County. According to those numbers, Bulloch is still gaining up its economic competitors such as Brunswick/Glynn (8.53%, 30th), Dalton/Whitfield (7.77%, 26th), Rome/Floyd (3.18%, 25th), Albany/Dougherty (-0.09%, 24th), Valdosta/Lowndes (8.12%, 22nd), Athens/Clark (9.31%, 18th), etc. at a growth rate of 14.72% during the last five years alone and now ranks 32nd. Bulloch has moved up four ranks in the last four years surpassing Spalding & Troup Counties in 2004 and Liberty & Walker Counties in 2005. Barrow County passed Bulloch in 2007 though.

Bulloch's population is listed at 66,176 for July 2007 - up from 57,683 for July 2002.

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There was an interesting article in the Statesboro Herald last week about the Census making it more clear this year to count college students in the location where they attend school (where they are located most of the year). Usually parents have counted their dependents in their hometowns as part of the parents household, but this year the census makes it more clear what the hazy rules are. From my experience, I think that typically around 10,000 or 2/3 of Georgia Southern students are counted in their hometowns during the Census. If all students are counted in Statesboro this year, it would add around 12-13,000 to the local population that has previous been ignored. I would also estimate that about 10-12,000 of those students would be counted in Statesboro's city limit population, and all would be counted in Statesboro's urban area.

The article went on to talk about how Statesboro is expected to be reclassified to MSA after the 2010 count, which is exactly what Ive been saying since i joined this forum in 2006. Now local officials are working to get things ready for Statesboro to become a Metropolitan area. There have been rapid population growths in the Statesboro area and in Southeastern Bulloch County which is the approximate half-way point between Statesboro and Savannah. Due to the rule clarification, Georgia Southern is said to be joining the city to make sure every GSU student is counted in the Census for Statesboro. Local officials are also recognizing that while Statesboro's city limit population is only 28,000, its urban population is probably greater than 50,000 and even more if all 19,086 students are counted as part of the urban area population.

For my Applied GIS class project a year ago, I estimated the population growth of all the census clocks surrounding Statesboro then placed the blocks together to find if a shape could be formed that meets the Census definitions to created an Urbanized Area for Statesboro. I was able to do so, creating a UA of 53,000 in a 49 square mile area. At the time, I thought the definitions specified that urban areas must be at least 1000 density, but now the definitions are stating that the core blocks must have 1000 density and surrounding blocks must have 500 density. With these 'looser' definitions (allowing some blocks to be 500) I am even more confident that an urbanized area for Statesboro will be classified in 2010.

This is great news for the city, for commerce, and better yet for Transportation. Having an MPO created for Statesboro will help us finally get a much-needed transit system, and accelerated improvements such as the 67 connector, the northern loop, and other widening projects. If a transit system were created to connect downtown, GSU, East Bypass area, Brooklet, etc. it would definitely be a great asset to downtown to improve. Before I get too ahead of myself, let me quantify what I think this means for the area.

If (in the somewhat unlikely, but possible case that) all GSU students are counted in Bulloch, I estimate:

28,000 + 11,000 = 39,000 population for Statesboro for 2009. Maybe 42,000 for 2010.

70,000 + 13,000 = 83,000 population for Bulloch for 2009. Maybe 87,000 for 2010 - Southern Bulloch is still growing rapidly. Subdivisions are still being built even in this housing crisis (which has had a smaller impact on Bulloch than other areas).

I would estimate about 55-60,000 for a Statesboro urbanized area - because I originally estimated most GSU students being counted in last years project, and I used 2008 estimate data for the census blocks and GSU's 2008 enrollment (which has jumped another 1300 in 2009).

Additionally, Statesboro continues to attract retailers that typically locate in much larger, regional urban centers - which again points to an undercounting trend for Statesboro-Bulloch. Some of these businesses include Talbots, Olive Garden, Luxottica, Springhill Suites, etc. Several more large projects are planned but on hold due to the economy, but then again others are still moving forward.

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Wow, this thread really brings back some memories. I used to live near Statesboro in a small town in Bullock County named Brooklet, and was a 10th grade student at Southeast Bullock High School. The one thing I remember the most was how friendly South Georgians are. We lived down a dirt road in a ranch style home with corn growing next to our home on the right, bulls on the left, and peanuts across the road from us. And Statesboro Mall was the place to shop, and Statesboro residents called it, "The Tiny Mall." I really need to go down and see how things have changed since I lived there. They have even built a new Southeast Bullock High School. But sometimes with all the urban stress of Atlanta, I sometimes wish I had stayed in Bullock County/Statesboro.

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