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gs3

A question only natives can answer

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Since I've lived in SC (4 years) and been on these boards, I've noticed a trend with peoples attitudes and with postings.

It seems to me that most (not all) South Carolinians who are native to SC have a more negative view of the state, than those South Carolinians who have moved into the state from elsewhere. More times than not, when talking with natives I hear them put down their home state, sometimes in small ways, sometimes in very vocal ways. On these boards I see natives call out negative news stories about SC more often. Why is that?

True that you can only fix a problem if you are aware and admit to the problem, but once a problem/issue is identified....move on...positively.....don't dwell on the problem/issue.

I moved here because I fell in love with one of the cities and I'm high on the place. And guys, I work my ass off to help in some small way to make SC a better place.

Really seems sometimes SC natives are too hard on their state. There are thousands moving here yearly that love all the state has to offer. Instead of "whats wrong" with SC, maybe the mindset should be "whats right" (and there is a lot that is right). More positive, more pride and less negative, less apathy.

For the longest time, the state of Mississippi had a slogan on their signs as you entered the state that read "Only positive spoken here". Maybe SC should think about adopting that slogan and actively using it.

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SC natives (who actually care) are just sick of being on the bottom of most good lists and the top of most bad lists. When you see the potential our state holds and where we are currently, it's pretty frustrating, particularly when you are located between two prosperous states that started off similarly (actually NC started off poorer). Personally, I try my best to be balanced and optimistic and when I criticize, to offer constructive criticism. I like hearing good news concerning this state. I try to post economic development news about all areas of our state. I want to hear about the progress we're making in education. But at the same time, when you're born and raised and educated in SC and see your peers and classmates leave the state for greener pastures, you can't help but think, "Why are we behind? Why are we lagging?" Living and working in the Rock Hill/Charlotte area, the contrasts are even more obvious.

So, I criticize when necessary and praise when necessary.

I don't know what to think about that Mississippi slogan. The fact that that's even necessary speaks volumes.

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There are many positive things occuring in SC. But growing up there you kinda have the user's guide as to how things are run. It may be no different than anyplace else, but in relation to SC and it's neighbors it lacks the fortitude to move itself beyond the good ol days. That notion becomes frustrating because once again growing up in the south you already have a stigma against you then growing up in one of the souths most "southern" states it's twofold. It's nothing more than the people of SC who are upset with the mindset of certain populations of the state stating their greivences. SC has alot going for it but it just doesn't seem to concerned with the welfare of the people living there. Things may change but after growing up there and living even in KY now there is a difference in attitude as far as SC's mission for its people vs KY's mission.

I love SC, I'm a "Good Sandlapper" through and through but its frustrating to see all the potential either rot, or move away because there isn't much left for them to build with or on.

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Interesting. But that potential that is rotting in the eyes of some natives is the same potential that outsiders see as changing and improving. I sure as heck would not have chosen a state that was rotting to move to (nor do I think any of the other thousands who chose to move here would have either).

Such contrasting views.

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Part of it may also have to do with age. A lot of the older people aren't going anywhere, but most of us in the "creative class" demographic (24ish-35ish), like me and Sandlapper, are very mobile and simply want to experience the vibrancy of big cities with good economies that allow one to climb the economic ladder of success pretty easily without worrying about where you were born, what school you went to, or what your last name is. Too much of that still exists in SC. I mean, really, how much talent can a state expect to attract in this age of multiculturalism when it is still fighting culture wars over Confederate flags (and other memorabilia from that era), whether or not to observe MLK Day, and being the targeted state of a radical Christian secessionist movement in the 21st century?

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Not the state rotting but the people, the potential minds. Those who you see that have the ability to do great things but have absolutely no outlet or resources to support it. So they just rot and never live up to there potential.

A great example of this would be where I graduated from Marshall in WV. Marshall's mission is basically to serve by ways of formally educating the people of WV who basically can't afford to go to WVU. So therefore if I want to be a Dr. and I don't have the resources to attend WVU, and I live in SW'estrn WV then I can attend Marshall because that option is there without it that person would just rot, and never reach there potential from that aspect. They may go on to do great things in other areas but that ability to practice medicine isn't there. I know that WV isn't the greatest example to use as far a state taking care of its own, but in that scenerio Marshall serves its purpose very well. The same can be said for the state of KY, ie EKU, WKU, Morehead State, Murray State, etc. All these institutions are set up to serve the people of those regions who want to persue something but don't have the ability or resources to travel ot Lexington and attend UK.

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Part of it may also have to do with age. A lot of the older people aren't going anywhere, but most of us in the "creative class" demographic (24ish-35ish), like me and Sandlapper, are very mobile and simply want to experience the vibrancy of big cities with good economies that allow one to climb the economic ladder of success pretty easily without worrying about where you were born, what school you went to, or what your last name is. Too much of that still exists in SC. I mean, really, how much talent can a state expect to attract in this age of multiculturalism when it is still fighting culture wars over Confederate flags (and other memorabilia from that era), whether or not to observe MLK Day, and being the targeted state of a radical Christian secessionist movement in the 21st century?

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I mean, really, how much talent can a state expect to attract in this age of multiculturalism when it is still fighting culture wars over Confederate flags (and other memorabilia from that era), whether or not to observe MLK Day, and being the targeted state of a radical Christian secessionist movement in the 21st century?

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I'm at the upper end of the 24ish - 35ish creative class......lived in many cities and traveled. Everybody has to have those experiences and decide for themself, but leaving SC will do nothing to help change SC. If anything, those of us coming into SC will help bring about the change.

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Because SC just seems so behind ALL the time. I'm 20 and about 75% of the people in my age group I know who grew up in SC don't even want to live anywhere in the state after they graduate. They wanna go to Charlotte and Atlanta and other places, but it's like nobody's crazy about stayin here. I don't feel that way but it's kinda hard to explain.

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Well, I'm 40. When I was 23, I wanted to get out, and did. After six years, I realized what a great place Columbia was, so I quit my job with the Silly Service and moved back.

If I make negative statements, its probably because I'm frustrated at how slowly things change, yet at the same time think some things are changing too quickly.

And yeah, there's still a who's your daddy mentality, but I see that slowly fading out. I see that as a good thing.

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Part of it may also have to do with age. A lot of the older people aren't going anywhere, but most of us in the "creative class" demographic (24ish-35ish), like me and Sandlapper, .....

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Gsupstate - interesting question, & I do admit, despite still calling myself a sandlapper, I was frantic to get out of South Carolina. I don't think it was as much to do with it being the state but my hometown of Rock Hill. But the combination didn't help...

Friends that still live in SC themselves don't have the most positive image of SC, they also love the state but would never defend it. But that is part of the state's charm, it is in some people's minds the lovable ugly duckling. We all typically join in on joking about the state, from Colbert's satirical rant about SC being the true peach state (which I would agree with), to acknowledging the type of preppy jerk from the film Borat, to the early 1990's song 'South Carolina' by the NC band Archers of Loaf & simply - to name calling, 'South Cackalacka' & our hometown of 'The Hole' or 'Rock Hell'.

But I truly do love SC & I do think it is improving, but not only experiencing but taking part in the left over racism of the segregation era that continued through the 1970's as well as the religous extremism of the 80's - I don't have the most favorable opinion of my home state. On the other hand, some of my best memories are about SC & my family whose roots go back centuries in SC.

... but, if 35 is the end of my creativity - I better get cracking b/c I only have a few months to enjoy it ;)

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South Carolina definitely has an inferiority complex-we always have. However, we also have a superiority complex. This schizophrenic stance is frustrating to newcomers like you, but hey, that

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There was a politician in the mid 1800's, Preston Brooks I think, who made the following statement, "South Carolina, too small to be a republic, too large to be an insane asylum."

But then again, don't most folks who live wherever they live have a more negative view than people from outside?

I bet there are millions of native New Yorkers who hate, grumble, disagree with and object to much about their city, same with other places like Paris, California, Colorado, the Bahamas, etc, and yet people from all over the world either visit or move there.

I visitor from Illinois who only goes to Hilton Head for a week a year might think South Carolina is the most wonderful place on earth. I doubt he delves much into the level of education, job opportunities, crime stats, etc.

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There was a politician in the mid 1800's, Preston Brooks I think, who made the following statement, "South Carolina, too small to be a republic, too large to be an insane asylum."

But then again, don't most folks who live wherever they live have a more negative view than people from outside?

I bet there are millions of native New Yorkers who hate, grumble, disagree with and object to much about their city, same with other places like Paris, California, Colorado, the Bahamas, etc, and yet people from all over the world either visit or move there.

I visitor from Illinois who only goes to Hilton Head for a week a year might think South Carolina is the most wonderful place on earth. I doubt he delves much into the level of education, job opportunities, crime stats, etc.

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Part of it may also have to do with age. A lot of the older people aren't going anywhere, but most of us in the "creative class" demographic (24ish-35ish), like me and Sandlapper, are very mobile and simply want to experience the vibrancy of big cities with good economies that allow one to climb the economic ladder of success pretty easily without worrying about where you were born, what school you went to, or what your last name is. Too much of that still exists in SC. I mean, really, how much talent can a state expect to attract in this age of multiculturalism when it is still fighting culture wars over Confederate flags (and other memorabilia from that era), whether or not to observe MLK Day, and being the targeted state of a radical Christian secessionist movement in the 21st century?

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I was born, raised, and still live in the Greenville metro area of South Carolina. The reason I think negatively of South Carolina is because they seem really slow in progressing of things. We rank at the bottom of every list of good things and rank at the top of every list of bad things. Look at what our DOT is doing. Look at what Greenville County Council is doing. Why hasn't the gas tax been raised since 1987. It really doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that South Carolina is one of the most backward states in the country. Luckily, that is starting to change like with the smoking ban in the City of Greenville, even if it is happening very slowly. I still love the natural beauty of the state and how you're close to the mountains and the ocean and that's why I will continue to live here. :thumbsup:

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I think this is a question that is difficult to answer, even for a native South Carolinian.

My perspective is that it comes down to the trends in this state that stretch back generations. A lot of it comes from persistant bad rankings in everything, and more importantly, the perception of a lack of success and opportunities. We have always done things our own way in South Carolina, and very frequently it has not proven to be the best way- which comes down to politics. Anyway, these rankings wear on you, and they affect the national and local perception/stereotype of our state. We are not ignorant of these perceptions. And when you come from a small town, or even a large one, with "nothing to do" it reflects poorly on that town and on the state as a whole because you have nothing in your mind worth defending and people begin to assume that these perceptions are true.

The other major issue is the lack of opportunites for success- which comes down to the size of our cities (and no I'm not talking about annexation). Our relatively small cities/metros simply don't have the critical mass to produce the variety of jobs and companies needed to sustain that creative class.

You can talk to people who are in the GenX agegroup, and you will see that most of them left (eg. most people on this forum). This place sucks. This state sucks. The main problem that I run accross is that "There's nothing to do" -which I never really understood, but whatever. This can be translated into the perception that there is a lack of opportunities success and variety of entertainment in SC. If you can't see that its worth staying somewhere then you leave. Some of that is very true. The opportunities for the ever important creative class (of which I am a part as well) are not very many here in comparison to our neighboring states. It is so much easier to go to Atlanta or Charlotte to partake in their success. Many people I have met here in Clemson have no plans on staying here once they graduate. Why? SC sucks. Its backwards, and there's no opportunity.

I personally am feeling the effects of the lack of oportunites here in SC as I am starting to look for employment, and the more attractive jobs are those in larger cities in other states (for the most part). My ultimate goal is to move back to SC to help be a part of that change, but it will most likely require that I move elsewhere for a while and then move back.

I think that it doesn't come directly from the success of our sister state to the north, or Atlanta. These are assets to us, and one could argue that it is simply the fortunate geography of these states that gave them the cities that they have. People go to these places because they are near to SC, and they provide the level of activity and opportunity that they need.

My perception is also that CHANGE is happening, and its happening as we speak. Now, some of those GenXers are starting to come back. The young people are kicking the old guard out - mostly via attrition- but its happening. You are starting to see some major change in the way things run in this state because of that. Gov. Sanford is a prime example of an advocate for change. I think that the future for SC is bright, but it will take a lot longer to change the mindsets of people- especially those from the poor/rural parts of the state.

I know that I try to do the cheerleader thing for this state. People who know me know that I am a South Carolinian born and bred, and I am extremely proud of it. I speak highly and proudly of my city as you all know, even inspite of its many shortcomings. It is important that all of us do the same about where ever we are from, because if we don't, nothing is going to change. If you can't talk about how great your city and state are, then you can't expect anyone else to do the same. People want to see you say great things about where you are from- there's a whole thread dedicated about that in the Gville section.

I can ramble on for a while, so I'll leave it at that for now. :)

Since I've lived in SC (4 years) and been on these boards, I've noticed a trend with peoples attitudes and with postings.

It seems to me that most (not all) South Carolinians who are native to SC have a more negative view of the state, than those South Carolinians who have moved into the state from elsewhere. More times than not, when talking with natives I hear them put down their home state, sometimes in small ways, sometimes in very vocal ways. On these boards I see natives call out negative news stories about SC more often. Why is that?

True that you can only fix a problem if you are aware and admit to the problem, but once a problem/issue is identified....move on...positively.....don't dwell on the problem/issue.

I moved here because I fell in love with one of the cities and I'm high on the place. And guys, I work my ass off to help in some small way to make SC a better place.

Really seems sometimes SC natives are too hard on their state. There are thousands moving here yearly that love all the state has to offer. Instead of "whats wrong" with SC, maybe the mindset should be "whats right" (and there is a lot that is right). More positive, more pride and less negative, less apathy.

For the longest time, the state of Mississippi had a slogan on their signs as you entered the state that read "Only positive spoken here". Maybe SC should think about adopting that slogan and actively using it.

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Human nature to dislike what one knows best. Plus, people who grew up in SC and who are at least in their 30s grew up in a state that was worse than it is now, which affects their views of the state.

Greenville in the 1970s was boring, hot and unattractive, and the rednecks of that era were no more delightful than the ones now. So that's what I think of when I think of SC.

Plus the people I know when I go back to SC are those who are still around and who thus never left to do anything with their lives. And since SC still seems to have "you don't count for anything unless your family has lived here for hundreds of years, no matter what you've done or haven't done with your life", those people still run the place. Since they've never lived anywhere else, their abilities to improve SC by using better methods they've learned elsewhere are limited.

So what's to like?

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^Thats a fairly common attitude, unfortunately- especially for those places that are still boring an unattractive.

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Does this mean that you expect that when you turn 35, you will no longer be creative?

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Im 25 and have lived in anderson county all my life. I think SC is behind in a lot of things and tends to be too religious for me. Ill probably end up moving out of here before i turn 30 and am through with college. I just have more liberal and open views than a lot of my friends and co-workers here in the upstate.

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Well, I left about 30 years ago. The area that I left hasn't changed much at all. There is still a lack of employment opportunities in my immediate home area., which prompted me to leave.

I think that Lake City had more industrial/manufacturing jobs back then than it does now. There once was Wentworth, Talon, W. Lee Flowers, T. S. Ragsdale, A. B. Dick and some others. Now there's only Nan Ya Plastics, which has around 1000 jobs, but there is no versatility in the industrial sector. All of the companies listed up top (except for Nan Ya, W. Lee Flowers) are no longer there.

In order for many (educated/trained) who remained to get a well paying job, they had to go to neighboring towns, ie Florence, Myrtle Beach, Sumter..

Oh I almost forgot, there was the tobacco market which yielded around 60 Million annually. I look back now and wonder what happened to the taxes from the 60 Mil. One thing I know for sure is that it wasn't reinvested into the local area because if it had, there would be evidence of it doing so.

Most of my friends also left the state to find gainful employment opportunities.

The saga continues today.................

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