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2nd Avenue subway construction

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Daily News...

2nd Ave. stubway for now

Miniline planned for 96th-72nd

By PETE DONOHUE

Transportation honchos plan to kick off the Second Ave. subway with a miniline that runs from 96th to 72nd Sts. and then shoots over to Broadway to bring passengers downtown, the Daily News has learned.

The project could be ready in as few as seven years.

"It makes the most sense," Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman Peter Kalikow told the Daily News. "When you are done with that, you have an operating segment that ties into other lines and gives great service over to Times Square and downtown."

Construction could start late this year on the first leg of the long-awaited project.

New stations would be built along Second Ave. at 96th, 86th and 72nd Sts. The line would then curve west - stopping at the 63rd St. and Lexington Ave. F line station, then run downtown along the existing Broadway tunnel.

The plan is included in documents submitted to the Federal Transit Administration. The proposal is expected to be released in the coming weeks, when the public can comment.

Officials have told the MTA it would be easier to get federal cash if the agency built the Second Ave. subway in segments so at least some service will be up and running.

The first segment would attract about 200,000 daily riders and bring much-needed relief to the overcrowded Lexington Ave. line, officials have said.

The next three segments would extend the line from 125th St. to Hanover Square. The entire project will cost about $17 billion and be completed around 2020.

The first part of the project will make life more difficult along the avenue before it makes it better.

There will be lane closures, construction noise and truck traffic. Some businesses and residents will be displaced, either temporarily or permanently, as station entrances would be inside buildings instead of on sidewalks.

"It's going to be a headache with the noise and people running around doing construction," said Philip Roman, an optician at E. 72nd St. and Second Ave.

There is a lot of uncertainty along the avenue, said Francesca Macaraaron, manager of Penang Restaurant at Second Ave. and E. 83rd St., which has an outdoor cafe.

"We may lose a whole season of the cafe and quite possibly the entire restaurant," Macaraaron said. "Quite frankly, we are concerned."

But Charles Warren, an area resident and Community Board 8 chairman, said, in general, the board and many East Siders believe the new line is desperately needed and, after some pain, will benefit the entire city.

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NY Post...

HEY, WAIT A '2ND'

By CLEMENTE LISI

May 24, 2004 -- Letters have been sent out to businesses along the Upper East Side, warning them that their properties "may be impacted" to make room for the long-awaited Second Avenue Subway, officials said.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has sent out letters over the last month saying the businesses have been put on a list of places targeted for eviction in order to make room for station entrances, ventilation shafts and power substations.

"The construction of the new subway may have an impact on your property," the letter warns.

The properties would be uprooted over the next seven years to make way for the first phase of the new line, which includes stations at 96th, 86th and 72nd streets.

"We are already looking for other space in the area," said Bruce Dimpflmaier, general manager at Tony's di Napoli, a restaurant on 83rd Street that is slated to be partially condemned to make room for a station entrance.

"But we are still doing everything we can to get them to move the entrance someplace else."

The proposed 8.5-mile line, which would go from 125th Street in East Harlem to Hanover Square in the Financial District, is slated for completion in 2020. Construction on the $16.8 billion line is scheduled to begin in December.

The MTA outlined a plan last month where it said it would build the underground line in four segments starting with the Upper East Side.

The first segment will ease overcrowding on the Nos. 4, 5 and 6 trains and attract an estimated 202,000 daily riders. The segment would veer west at 63rd Street, connect to the Broadway line and travel to Brooklyn.

Most of the properties would be needed to make room for above-ground station entrances.

MTA Chairman Peter Kalikow defended taking over the property, arguing that building the line should not come as a surprise to anyone.

"They knew it was coming. It's not like we sprung this on them," he said.

Under the state's Eminent Domain Procedure Law, the MTA is allowed to condemn property it needs and would compensate and help relocate residents and businesses displaced by the project.

If people refuse the compensation package, the MTA can file a petition in court to take over the property.

Although many of the businesses on the list include national chains like CVS Pharmacy and Duane Reade, some, like Falk Drug and Surgical Supply - which has been on 72nd Street for more than 50 years - have become neighborhood favorites.

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In any other city, what New York is planning currently for Second Ave would be considered far more than a "stubway."

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Daily News...

2nd Ave. roadblock

Pol threatens subway

DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

A Staten Island congressman is vowing to slam the brakes on the proposed Second Ave. subway - earning sharp criticism from its biggest supporters.

Rep. Vito Fossella (R-S.I.) said he has enlisted the chairman of the House Transportation Committee to help block billions in federal funds needed for the new subway line - a hardball tactic to get the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to expand Staten Island bus service.

Fossella made the same threat earlier this year, saying it was because state Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan) was blocking progress on a new South Ferry subway station.

Silver dropped his objections last week after winning some concessions for Battery Park improvements from the MTA.

Fossella is now griping about inadequate bus service that causes jam-packed buses and arduous commutes. He also said the MTA has not lived up to its pledge to build a new bus depot on the island.

"For decades, Staten Island has been underserved by mass transit, creating unconscionable hardships for commuters," Fossella said. "The neglect must end."

The MTA hopes to begin building the long-awaited Second Ave. subway - seen as a way to bring relief to the insanely packed Lexington Ave. line and boost the city economy - this year.

The first segment will cost an estimated $3.8 billion, and the MTA is counting on a big contribution from the federal government.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-Manhattan/Queens), a long-time Second Ave. subway supporter, blasted Fossella for what she called divisive tactics.

"Given the anti-New York sentiment in this Congress, our delegation needs to work together on the state's shared priorities rather than holding our best projects hostage," Maloney said.

Silver spokeswoman Eileen Larrabee said it was "outrageous that Congressman Fossella is continuing his obstructionist ways by seeking to deprive New Yorkers of valuable federal money."

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What kind of construction technique are they going to build this subway line? I think one method called "cut and cover" involves huge and lengthy street closures. I don't know if NYers could take it today.

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Have they even started construction yet? They supposedly were going to break ground by the end of 2004. And don't get technical on me, I know they officially broke ground in 1972 before they stopped because of the fiscal crisis :rolleyes:

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"New stations would be built along Second Ave. at 96th, 86th and 72nd Sts. The line would then curve west - stopping at the 63rd St. and Lexington Ave. F line station, then run downtown along the existing Broadway tunnel."

Broadway?

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63rd Street on the F line has a hidden platform, which I believe will be utilized for 2nd Ave. trains coming from the north. They will then move across Central Park on existing track that meets the Broadway line at 57th St./7th Ave.

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63rd Street on the F line has a hidden platform, which I believe will be utilized for 2nd Ave. trains coming from the north. They will then move across Central Park on existing track that meets the Broadway line at 57th St./7th Ave.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

So It'll only be an East Side train for 24 blocks :(

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You can see on this map that the Q line will be the initial allignment. 125th to 63rd via 2nd Ave., then Broadway Line to downtown and beyond.

Eventually, there will be a T line that will run the length of the East Side.

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You can see on this map that the Q line will be the initial allignment. 125th to 63rd via 2nd Ave., then Broadway Line to downtown and beyond.

Eventually, there will be a T line that will run the length of the East Side.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Excellent. That T would be a wonderful addition. Thanks for the link, Cotuit.

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I hope along with this project, they clean up all the graffiti-infested, dirty and smelly trains for the benefit of its users.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

you either haven't been to nyc in the past 15 years or you are just trying to be funny.

all nyc subway cars have been grafitti free for 15 years. if any train is found to have grafitti on it, they immediately take it out of service to clean it in the yard. thats a FACT. anyone from nyc will tell you that.

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63rd Street on the F line has a hidden platform, which I believe will be utilized for 2nd Ave. trains coming from the north. They will then move across Central Park on existing track that meets the Broadway line at 57th St./7th Ave.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

correct. heres more info on that station as well as pictures of the unused platform.

http://www.nycsubway.org/ind/6thave/ind-63rd-lex.html

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I know that NYC was one of only 4 cities to recieve FTA funding for a new project this year......what did they receive funding for? 2nd Ave?

Also, what is the status of the 42nd St. LRT? I assume it is just a concept at this point? Have any actual studies (MIS, EIS etc) begun? If it did become a reality, what would the time frame be? Also, how would they handle all those at grade crossings?

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I know that NYC was one of only 4 cities to recieve FTA funding for a new project this year......what did they receive funding for?  2nd Ave?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Either that, or the East Side Connection, perhaps both.

Also, what is the status of the 42nd St. LRT?  I assume it is just a concept at this point?  Have any actual studies (MIS, EIS etc) begun?  If it did become a reality, what would the time frame be?  Also, how would they handle all those at grade crossings?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I don't think that is officially on the MTAs radar at this point. It would handle grade crossings like any other streetcar.

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I hate the idea of a 2nd avenue line. Its a waste of money that could be better invested in other communities and boroughs that need better transportation options. Once again, NY caters to the upper east side at the expense of everyone else. Let them walk from Lex like always. Its crazy.

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I hate the idea of a 2nd avenue line. Its a waste of money that could be better invested in other communities and boroughs that need better transportation options. Once again, NY caters to the upper east side at the expense of everyone else. Let them walk from Lex like always. Its crazy.

2nd Ave. takes strain off of Lex. which helps people travelling to/from the Bronx.

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you either haven't been to nyc in the past 15 years or you are just trying to be funny.

all nyc subway cars have been grafitti free for 15 years. if any train is found to have grafitti on it, they immediately take it out of service to clean it in the yard. thats a FACT. anyone from nyc will tell you that.

How quickly? I don't go to the city often, but I was there in January 2005 for a career fair at MSG, and I think the train that took me there did have grafitti on it. My memory may just be getting mixed up as I visited Boston and DC around the same time. I wasn't bothered by it, I'm just telling you what I think I saw.

I saw a special on cable a while ago about NYC's subway; it mentioned they're in the process of upgrading the trains to new models that are faster and that are equipped with lasers that sense the prescence of things like other trains or hobos getting in the way and will stop, thus allowing for less safety distance and more trains per line. Any news on that?

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How quickly?

I lived in NYC for 3 years and took the subway daily. I only ever saw one train in-service with graffiti sprayed on it. One, in three years. And everyone on the platform was staring at it in amazement because it was such a strange site.

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I hate the idea of a 2nd avenue line. Its a waste of money that could be better invested in other communities and boroughs that need better transportation options. Once again, NY caters to the upper east side at the expense of everyone else. Let them walk from Lex like always. Its crazy.

This is such an absurd statement. To quote a line from Austin Powers, "You...you just don't get it, do you". This line was supposed to have been built 60 years ago after the "El" was torn down along 2nd avenue. Yet for various reasons, it was not, even though it was started up again from 1972-75 and some of the tunnel was built before the city teetered on bankruptcy and it was postponed again. Having one SINGLE subway line for the ridiculosly crowded east side (while the west side has 3) is ludicrous, don't ya think?

If you ever rode the #6 subway during rush hour and had to wait for about 6 trains to go by before you could wedge your way on, you'd understand.

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If you ever rode the #6 subway during rush hour and had to wait for about 6 trains to go by before you could wedge your way on, you'd understand.

I attempted to board a 6 train during rush hour once, never again! Later, I was on an F train that broke down at 63rd Street, they told us to walk to the 6 and use the free out-of-system transfer. No thank you, I walked to 44th Street.

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