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richyb83

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I'm with dan on this...

 

Smart Planning should create walk-able communities, not bubbles in the heart of a city. This general area has the potential to become a walk-able community, not one scattered with tiny bubble communities. 

 

While there may be multiple entries/outings for the development, they are all linked to Perkins. Perkins is a highly traveled road and this soon will become one of the biggest cluster fu<%s in the city, it is essential that something be done to decrease the amount of traffic in this area as a whole. 

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It's more fun when were making fun of TImelord :(

Yeah I can't wait to see your face when the IOC president say's, "The International Olympic Committee awards the honor of hosting the 35th Olympiad in 2032 to the city of...Baton Rouge.".

 

All you are is a troll that I will crush!

gif-troll-5.gif

Edited by timelordnerd

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It just so happens that when most of the subdivisions along Perkins were developed, there WAS nothing to connect to along the backside. There was a railroad track and woods.

That doesn't give them a free pass, that's just an example of bad planning.

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That doesn't give them a free pass, that's just an example of bad planning.

 

"Someone's going to build a Mall here 40 years from now. We better spend extra money to build a back entrance to the woods."

 

You're right. Sounds reasonable. 

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"Someone's going to build a Mall here 40 years from now. We better spend extra money to build a back entrance to the woods."

 

You're right. Sounds reasonable. 

For example, Prairieville in the 90s compared to the Prairieville of 2030, 40 years later.

If you're familiar with the Manchac Commons (?) subdivision on Bluff Rd near Old Perkins, it is a major hindrance in the event that Hwy 42 were to be extended to I-10.

 

Or take a look at Westminster, a simple connection to Oliphant Rd would help with some of the congestion at the Drusilla/Jefferson intersection. Now take the back entrance to Inniswold via Blue Cross Blue Shield (good example), there should have been a way to get to Seigen Ln via one of the neighborhood streets.

 

I could go on and on about these little nuances throughout the area, they are just all examples of bad planning which lead to unnecessary use of main arterial roads. That eliminates the need to use I-10 (or Airline) to hop over one street, which I witness far too often and isn't the purpose of freeways.

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For example, Prairieville in the 90s compared to the Prairieville of 2030, 40 years later.

If you're familiar with the Manchac Commons (?) subdivision on Bluff Rd near Old Perkins, it is a major hindrance in the event that Hwy 42 were to be extended to I-10.

 

Or take a look at Westminster, a simple connection to Oliphant Rd would help with some of the congestion at the Drusilla/Jefferson intersection. Now take the back entrance to Inniswold via Blue Cross Blue Shield (good example), there should have been a way to get to Seigen Ln via one of the neighborhood streets.

 

I could go on and on about these little nuances throughout the area, they are just all examples of bad planning which lead to unnecessary use of main arterial roads. That eliminates the need to use I-10 (or Airline) to hop over one street, which I witness far too often and isn't the purpose of freeways.

 

For every subdivision you mention, there are others that do have good cut through's and reasonable connectivity to surrounding neighborhoods (for subdivisions). Oak Hills, Tara, Kenilworth. I can go on. 

 

Also, for the record, I used the Drusilla/Jefferson intersection multiple times per day for two years, and very little of the traffic problem there stemmed from cars entering and leaving Westminster. The problem stems from EB traffic on Jefferson trying to execute a left-turn onto Drusilla, and likewise SB traffic on Drusilla trying to execute a left hand turn onto Jefferson to head towards Bluebonnet. This traffic pattern can be blamed on the Essen dog leg and the fact that Bluebonnet didn't exist in its current form when Westminster was constructed. Nobody could have expected it. 

 

If you would've used Essen as an example, I might have agreed. But there was no way to foresee Bluebonnet as a thing at the time. Development in the city was still concentrated out along Florida Boulevard. Incidentally, the neighborhoods on Florida are reasonably well-connected. 

 

Urban planning is one thing. Seeing the future is another. I truly am not trying to argue that this is a well-planned city, so I hope it doesn't sound that way. I simply think it's a little unfair to fault the developers of 1960 for not realizing exactly what Baton Rouge would look like--both in population and traffic pattern--40 years later when the issue really began to snowball. 

 

I agree about Seigen. A connector between Cedar Park Drive and Fernbrook Avenue seems reasonable. Would give residents much easier access to all of the amenities on Seigen. They practically have to go around the world to get to their own backyard the way the streets there are laid out. 

Edited by garrett_225

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On another subject, has anyone else noticed street flooding in areas that used to not have problems? I've heard some people blaming the "sewer improvements" the city has been working on for the past few years. 

 

I'm told there was at least 1.5 feet of water on some streets off of Jefferson.

 

Anyone notice more frequent flooding problems in other parts of town?

Edited by garrett_225

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For every subdivision you mention, there are others that do have good cut through's and reasonable connectivity to surrounding neighborhoods (for subdivisions). Oak Hills, Tara, Kenilworth. I can go on. 

 

Also, for the record, I used the Drusilla/Jefferson intersection multiple times per day for two years, and very little of the traffic problem there stemmed from cars entering and leaving Westminster. The problem stems from EB traffic on Jefferson trying to execute a left-turn onto Drusilla, and likewise SB traffic on Drusilla trying to execute a left hand turn onto Jefferson to head towards Bluebonnet. This traffic pattern can be blamed on the Essen dog leg and the fact that Bluebonnet didn't exist in its current form when Westminster was constructed. Nobody could have expected it. 

 

If you would've used Essen as an example, I might have agreed. But there was no way to foresee Bluebonnet as a thing at the time. Development in the city was still concentrated out along Florida Boulevard. Incidentally, the neighborhoods on Florida are reasonably well-connected. 

 

Urban planning is one thing. Seeing the future is another. I truly am not trying to argue that this is a well-planned city, so I hope it doesn't sound that way. I simply think it's a little unfair to fault the developers of 1960 for not realizing exactly what Baton Rouge would look like--both in population and traffic pattern--40 years later when the issue really began to snowball. 

 

I agree about Seigen. A connector between Cedar Park Drive and Fernbrook Avenue seems reasonable. Would give residents much easier access to all of the amenities on Seigen. They practically have to go around the world to get to their own backyard the way the streets there are laid out. 

Good points.

 

As for Westminster, where did Gail Dr intersect way back when, if Bluebonnet weren't there? There are some pretty old homes back there, some predating Westminster if I'm not mistaken.

 

Well, I'll use Essen now. :thumbsup:  Traffic could use Forest Hill Dr or United Plaza Blvd.

 

I agree that it is wrong to blame the developers for what they did not know, although it's still a negative conclusion from a traffic standpoint. However I will say, I don't think it's unreasonable to look ahead a few decades to see how a large development may impact it's environment. Even they did projections, right?

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As for Westminster, where did Gail Dr intersect way back when, if Bluebonnet weren't there? There are some pretty old homes back there, some predating Westminster if I'm not mistaken.

 

 

 

Gail Drive and surrounding streets of Jefferson Terrace were accessed with Bluebonnet Road--a different thing than what we know today as Bluebonnet Boulevard, which was built a few hundred feet to the East. Instead of ending in a cul-de-sac as it does today, Bluebonnet Road dead-ended at Gail Drive. It was just a little country lane off of Jefferson Highway. It didn't take you anywhere but Jefferson Terrace. 

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Interestingly, as late as 1965, city street maps show the proposed I-10 route to New Orleans taking a somewhat different route than we know today. The proposed route that the map reflects follows the same trajectory as it does today until you go a little farther East of the current Bluebonnet/I-10 interchange. After that, it starts to veer noticeably further South than it does today...at the time, the proposed intersection with Seigen was just south of St. George School. They had it cutting right through the middle of Highland Lakes Subdivision (Fulwar Skipwith Drive)  :rofl:

Edited by garrett_225

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Great conversation! I'll just re-continue almost two months later :w00t:

 

It's crazy to think how far Bluebonnet has come...from a sleepy little narrow two lane dead end road; maybe a mile long? To what it has become today!

 

An old story talked about the way BR's Geography was set up in the old days; how the elevated land was in the shape of a "hand"...and the fingers going in a SE direction; Jefferson Hwy; Perkins Rd(formerly upper Highland Rd) & lower Highland Rd; with the lowlands(Ward's Creek; Bayou Duplantier; Bayou Fountain) in between....those fingers connected by north/south shoe strings Essen/Staring & Siegen Lane...Truly an overgrown country town!

 

My granddad used to tell me stories how Jefferson Hwy was to way to NOLA...& Old Hammond Hwy was the only way out east....Would go rabbit hunting where Bon Carre is located(old Bon Marche' Mall)...and hear wolves howling where Cortana Mall is...WILD stuff!!

Edited by richyb83
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Ummm...YES....Check out the "MIDDLE" pic again....way down Perkins Road(on left side) you can see the 6-story office tower at Perkins Rowe 

 

Was using that as a reference point!  I know so...

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I actually drove down there on Saturday and Perkins is in the background, it would have been better to call it the parking garage or maybe that is just me. The building you noted (Richy) has always been called the parking garage by me. 

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Yeah it's actually a 3 story office building on top of the 3 story parking garage = 6 floors....with a Fitness Center on ground level facing Perkins Road. Next to the Fresh Market.  All part of Perkins Rowe.

Edited by richyb83
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Here is a closer shot of the office building on top of the parking garage at Perkins Rowe...had to dig into the vault to find this pic from back in 2011....

July2011060_zps42bc5e46.jpg

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Here is a closer shot of the office building on top of the parking garage at Perkins Rowe...had to dig into the vault to find this pic from back in 2011....

July2011060_zps42bc5e46.jpg

Look at that traffic cluster...yikes! 

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