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NewBurgh

National retailers in new developments

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If you owned an independent book store, would you want a Borders to open next door? Its the same concept. There has been talk of national vendors rather than just small artisans going into the Strip Market. That could pose a major challenge to the established niche retail on Penn Avenue.

On a somewhat related note. I think that this is unfortunately going to have to be my last post for a while. I've have come close to creating a conflict of interest for myself on this board, and after tomorrow I will run a much larger risk of doing so. I will of course continue to be an avid reader!

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The Borders analogy reminded me of some concerns with various developments going on around the city (SouthSide, East Liberty,...) I wonder how much these national chains will change the landscape of the city. Will independent businesses be able to compete with these national chains, or if they will actually help each other? I'm not sure how the SSW is affecting the west end of Carson. Probably outside $ will help E.Liberty.

I think the city is really turning itself around, and I would hate to see its local charms lost in the process.

Thoughts?

Moderator note: I am going to split this off into a new topic. It seems like it should be its own thread :)

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I welcome everyone into the mix, but I would like to see a more diverse offering of products instead of multiple locations of the same business. For example, Macy's would do well to turn the downtown store into a high service Bloomingdale's to attract people downtown for something different. So I hope we can attract some companies that are represented in the region.

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I'm not completely opposed to national chains moving in. It is probably an unstoppable trend across the country. Even Manhattan now has big box stores. I do think they give a little too much credit to the Home Depot in East Liberty for the current areas transformation. I think it is much more due to Whole Foods taking a chance there. After all, Home Depot was practically given the space and the areas transformation has taken place many many years after the HDs opening. Whole foods and the Borders development reignited a flickering flame, and as an "urban" development.

I do have a bit of a problem with plans for a Target at Bakery Square and a Walmart at the Reizenstein School site. It's not that I'm against these developments, it's just their locations. The Reizenstein School site is right next to expensive Townhomes. Townhomes that were at the forefront of the redevelopment of the area in extending Shadyside towards East Liberty. This is noticeable as the project virtually turns its back on Penn Avenue completely and focuses on Shady Avenue side. People that live there surely can't approve of this proposal.

These projects, (Target/Walmart), I believe, will diminish the areas true potential. My biggest problem with these projects are that they both face directly on to Mellon Park. This a blatant misuse of a valuable city asset. There is no shortage of vacant properties in this city, even in East Liberty, that would serve the purpose of these "urbanized" suburban strip malls. The sites adjacent to this park hold a unique opportunity for luxury housing, with park views and access in an area thats already pleasant and desirable and has a lot of buzz and interest. We are giving away a very unique opportunity to expand a popular residential area. This land is a valuable commodity. Look at the state of the strip mall where the Shop 'n' Save was. Trader Joe's at least used an existing building in an urban fashion. The Bakery Square project uses existing buildings but the Target won't nor will the Walmart. They will be suburban bombs on a very traditional, successful historic urban neighborhood.

With East Liberty's new success, it is time to start asking if this is the best use for this property, this area. Perhaps we are now actually in a position to start saying no, this will not be the best direction to go. I believe these developments will be very disruptive, much more than Home Depot was. They will not enhance the natural energy that is growing there now. I believe it will stifle a more organic growth.

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I'm not completely opposed to national chains moving in. It is probably an unstoppable trend across the country. Even Manhattan now has big box stores. I do think they give a little too much credit to the Home Depot in East Liberty for the current areas transformation. I think it is much more due to Whole Foods taking a chance there. After all, Home Depot was practically given the space and the areas transformation has taken place many many years after the HDs opening. Whole foods and the Borders development reignited a flickering flame, and as an "urban" development.

I do have a bit of a problem with plans for a Target at Bakery Square and a Walmart at the Reizenstein School site. It's not that I'm against these developments, it's just their locations. The Reizenstein School site is right next to expensive Townhomes. Townhomes that were at the forefront of the redevelopment of the area in extending Shadyside towards East Liberty. This is noticeable as the project virtually turns its back on Penn Avenue completely and focuses on Shady Avenue side. People that live there surely can't approve of this proposal.

These projects, (Target/Walmart), I believe, will diminish the areas true potential. My biggest problem with these projects are that they both face directly on to Mellon Park. This a blatant misuse of a valuable city asset. There is no shortage of vacant properties in this city, even in East Liberty, that would serve the purpose of these "urbanized" suburban strip malls. The sites adjacent to this park hold a unique opportunity for luxury housing, with park views and access in an area thats already pleasant and desirable and has a lot of buzz and interest. We are giving away a very unique opportunity to expand a popular residential area. This land is a valuable commodity. Look at the state of the strip mall where the Shop 'n' Save was. Trader Joe's at least used an existing building in an urban fashion. The Bakery Square project uses existing buildings but the Target won't nor will the Walmart. They will be suburban bombs on a very traditional, successful historic urban neighborhood.

With East Liberty's new success, it is time to start asking if this is the best use for this property, this area. Perhaps we are now actually in a position to start saying no, this will not be the best direction to go. I believe these developments will be very disruptive, much more than Home Depot was. They will not enhance the natural energy that is growing there now. I believe it will stifle a more organic growth.

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Speaking of Wal-Mart: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07051/763384-28.stm

Looks like they are going to build one in the old vacant shopping center in East Hills. That center has been empty since I was in first grade (at least). So I have to say, in this particular case I am actually kind of glad to see a Wal-Mart going in. They're taking a chance on a shopping center no one else would.

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