Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Chickenwing

Green Community

13 posts in this topic

After reading the gas watch postings, and noticing some people care about their impact on the environment, I decided to post about this.

A friend and I have been discussing the feasibility of developing a green community in Greenville. He called me the other day to see if I had some land for a business associate who is looking to build one. This led to the discussion of whether Greenville is ready for this type of development, what kind of price range it would need to be in, and where to locate something like this.

Based on the number of acres this guy was looking for, it would be quite a few homes. I just don't know that the demand is there yet. Or maybe the public has not been educated well enough about the benefits of green building vs cost.

This was the second time in a week that I had heard of someone looking to do some green housing.

So I guess my questions would be:

1. Is there enough demand in Greenville for green housing?

2. Where would you locate it, not specifically, but what would you look for in a property location?

3. Would a community that incorporates green housing into its plan, say 10-20% of the overall community, be a better idea in the near term?

4. What kind of density?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I think this would be an excellent idea. I have had a few clients ask if there is such a thing in the area. Many, if not all, of the homes in Kilgore Farms are Energy Star rated, however, I don't think of that neighborhood as truly 'Green'.

The best eco-friendly homes are infill, but if you are going for a whole neighborhood, I would think that Powdersville/Peidmont would be the best area. There are large tracts of land with good, close access to the business district. The lots should be small, but with a lot of common open space that saves as many of the mature trees as possible. Sidewalks are a must. Specific retail (grocer, restaurant) and commercial offices should also be included to keep excess driving down.

Constructions costs are in the range of 10-20% higher. But that is paid back in just a few years in energy savings and is a pretty easy sell to a potential buyer. I think that any price range could handle it, or even a mix from mid-low to high end would work in one neighborhood. Diversity is a good thing.

Check out Earthcraft House for info on what constructions methods and architectures are possible for an earth friendly house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be great if one of the old Mill Villages in the area was revitalized under such a concept. They already have the basis layout. It's neat to see the actual mills being saved and turned into nice living space but kind of disturbing the surrounding neighborhood is not. The Lofts at Monagan looks great but it's kind of sad to see it surrounded by the fence. I'd love to live in a community like Dunean or Monagan except they have really gone downhill in recent years and I worry about security, etc. Amazingly however Dunean is still in fairly good shape in most parts. As a child I went to the Baptist church in that Community and I love the layout of the place with all the sidewalks, big shade trees. They even have the potential of central business district. Right now they have a few store fronts. I even think the old barber shop is still in business and they have had a cafe and drug store their at one time.

Another place that could be turned around as a greenway/green community is the actual town/village of Taylors (not the mega postal/district/area).

I see talk here about how Poinsett Hwy needs to be revitalized but the Poe Mill Community is in that area and is one of the most serious blights on the city with reports of drugs, prostitution, etc. I'd love for them to do with Poe Mill what they did with the Viola Street area just down the road? Has anyone been to the Ham House recently and seen the really nice neighborhood behind it? A few years ago that was one of the worst slums in the city of Greenville. Now I wouldn't mind living their myself. It has changed that much and it still looks classic and has an old town character to it.

Before we go tearing up more farm land or forests lets see what we can do to revitalize the old and historic parts of town. (Yes, I love watching This Old House). I don't mind progress one bit but I think it can be done in a way that still preserves our history instead of cutting it down and chopping it up. Cherrydale is an exception. I'm glad the unsightly characterless factory on a hill is gone and the Cherrydale Mansion was moved to a location where it could be enjoyed and used by more people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be great if you could find an area in the city for this type of development. I could easily see the city of Greenville working with the developer to promote such living. I'm sure there are plots of land large enough. The Preserve at Parkins Mill has 63 lots on developed land in the city... Anyway, it sounds like a great concept. I think that the locals might needs some education on the advantages of green building for houses since this would be a first for the area, but with the amount of newcomers I doubt it'd be a problem if locals didn't embrace the idea and move themselves to the neighborhood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the concept is great. But what is the green-mentality of the population? Are they ready to buy in?

When we moved here 18 months ago, I was very surprised that recycling is not a part of all garbage collection services. (We are in the county, not the city.) That is usually the first thing one sees as a community adopts the green-mentality.

But so far, I haven't seen any big push in that direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the concept is great. But what is the green-mentality of the population? Are they ready to buy in?

When we moved here 18 months ago, I was very surprised that recycling is not a part of all garbage collection services. (We are in the county, not the city.) That is usually the first thing one sees as a community adopts the green-mentality.

But so far, I haven't seen any big push in that direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They ought to make residents pay for trash removal by the pound. I create no more than one 8 gallon bag of trash a week. My recycling bin is usually overflowing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They ought to make residents pay for trash removal by the pound. I create no more than one 8 gallon bag of trash a week. My recycling bin is usually overflowing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


The city doesn't push the recycling thing down your throat, but they will happily provide you with another container, if you need more. Most people I know of living in the city limits have two containers, including my family. I would like to see the city be more aggressive with it, though. We need an example to follow. Is CT one of the states that has penalties for not recycling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The city doesn't push the recycling thing down your throat, but they will happily provide you with another container, if you need more. Most people I know of living in the city limits have two containers, including my family. I would like to see the city be more aggressive with it, though. We need an example to follow. Is CT one of the states that has penalties for not recycling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This link shows the laws and enforcement policies of the northeastern states.

I was disappointed as well when I moved here how little emphasis is placed on recycling. :dontknow: I am still disappointed in how much trash is along the roadside as well. It seems like nobody takes any pride in the area. When I have visitors come from the northeast, they comment about how dirty it is here. Its embarrasing. <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm a firm beleiver in keeping our community clean. My wife and I own a company and have volunteered for the Adopt-a-highway program.

http://community.spinningsilk.com/

We officially pick up trash on Tulane and Gibson Roads which are right at the border of Berea and Travelers Rest. We also pick up trash unofficially in our neighborhoods when taking walks, etc. Gibson Road can get really bad as their is a wooded area at the far end away from White Horse Road where an old abandoned house is. Apparently that location is where people go for sneak away beer parties, parking, etc. Ironically this is right around the corner from the Blackberry Valley Dump. The majority of trash on our pick ups appear to be drink cans and bottles but the weirdest piece of trash we didn't pick up but reported to be picked up was a Greenville News paper machine that was in a ditch! Another weird piece of trash was an almost uneaten waffle meal from Waffle House?! What crazy person throws out a Waffle House to go plate?! Anyway if anyone drives down Tulane or Gibson and sees trash let me know. We have a pick up day coming soon anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.