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Lmichigan

Wayne population skids

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A few notes I feel I need to make, as I don't think either the News or the Free Press put a lot of this Census information in perspective.

1. This is not good news, and I believe the population loss of Wayne County (i.e. read: Detroit) will only continue, and could even speed up.

2. Comparing the loss the Hurricane Katrina counties is pure shock value. They don't even try and make any mention of the most important population stat, percentage change.

3. To follow up on the above point, neither the Free Press or News bothers to say in their writings that there are other counties that have lost a greater percentage of their population since 2000 including Alleghany County (Pittsburgh), Phildelphia County (Philadelphia), and only slightly more than San Francisco County (San Francisco). I guess they kept this out for effect. As usual, the News is even more blatant about it, at least the Free Press includes

4. Lastly, Michigan had a population gain of 1.6% since 2000, which is actually a greater population gain than the 80's when we saw, statistically, no growth (+0.4%). That said, it falls FAR short of our surprising gain over the 90's at 6.9%, and the gain could be wiped out altogether if this gets worse by decades end. It could join Metro Cleveland and Metro Pittsburg as the very few metros actually losing population.

0322_census.jpg

89,000 left Wayne County, census data show

While Michigan's population held steady in the last six years, Wayne County lost more residents than any other county in the country, save for hurricane-ravaged Orleans Parish, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates to be released today.

Wayne County's loss of more than 89,000 residents from 2000 to 2006 represents an ongoing slide, fueled by the steady number of families leaving Detroit and high job losses and foreclosures. But that loss has meant rapid growth in places like Livingston, Washtenaw and Macomb counties.

http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article...20327&imw=Y

0322_census_counties.jpg

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Wayne population skids

If not for Hurricane Katrina, Wayne County would be No. 1 in the nation.

But hold the cheering.

Wayne County lost more people than any other county between 2005 and 2006 except for four Gulf Coast counties pummeled by the hurricane, according to census data released today.

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/artic...METRO/703220391

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We just can't win for losing, these days.

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A few notes I feel I need to make, as I don't think either the News or the Free Press put a lot of this Census information in perspective.

1. This is not good news, and I believe the population loss of Wayne County (i.e. read: Detroit) will only continue, and could even speed up.

2. Comparing the loss the Hurricane Katrina counties is pure shock value. They don't even try and make any mention of the most important population stat, percentage change.

3. To follow up on the above point, neither the Free Press or News bothers to say in their writings that there are other counties that have lost a greater percentage of their population since 2000 including Alleghany County (Pittsburgh), Phildelphia County (Philadelphia), and only slightly more than San Francisco County (San Francisco). I guess they kept this out for effect. As usual, the News is even more blatant about it, at least the Free Press includes

4. Lastly, it would take quite a bit more out-migration to erase Michigan's population gain of 1.6% since 2000, which is actually a greater population gain than the 80's when we saw, statistically, no growth. That said, it falls FAR short of our surprising gain over the 90's at 6.9%

0322_census.jpg

89,000 left Wayne County, census data show

While Michigan's population held steady in the last six years, Wayne County lost more residents than any other county in the country, save for hurricane-ravaged Orleans Parish, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates to be released today.

Wayne County's loss of more than 89,000 residents from 2000 to 2006 represents an ongoing slide, fueled by the steady number of families leaving Detroit and high job losses and foreclosures. But that loss has meant rapid growth in places like Livingston, Washtenaw and Macomb counties.

http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article...20327&imw=Y

0322_census_counties.jpg

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wayne population skids

If not for Hurricane Katrina, Wayne County would be No. 1 in the nation.

But hold the cheering.

Wayne County lost more people than any other county between 2005 and 2006 except for four Gulf Coast counties pummeled by the hurricane, according to census data released today.

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/artic...METRO/703220391

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We just can't win for losing, these days.

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No, those demographics don't come out until we get the latest city estimates (2006) in July, I believe.

What is worrisome about this is that it's showing that those leaving Detroit, are helping further the sprawl northwards. If fast exploding Canton (probably around 90,000, now), Novi, etc...aren't offsetting this, it points to people fleeing further north or out of the state entirely.

That said, it really is a readjustment, and should come as no surprise.

I was kind of surprised to see the Census predicting that my metro area actually stagnated, last year. And, unlike Detroit where it's both Detroit and its inner-ring suburbs losing, in the case of Lansing, the stagnation is almost entirely a result of Lansing losing.

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Is there any information on what demographic we are losing the most of? i.e. is it middle class or upper class or poor people leaving for greener pastures.

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Something I put together, today, showing the 2005-2006 and the 2000-2006 changes for Metro Detroit, Southeast Michigan, and the State of Michigan to put this into better perspective:

Detroit MSA:

2005: 4,479,254

2006: 4,468,966

Net Loss: -10,288

Percent Change 2005-2006: -.22%

2000: 4,452,557

2006: 4,468,966

Net Gain: +16,409

Percent Change 2000-2006: +.36%

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Detroit CMSA:

2005: 5,417,882

2006: 5,410,014

Net Loss: -7,868

Percent Change 2005-2006: -.14%

2000: 5,357,538

2006: 5,410,014

Net Gain: +52,476

Percent Change 2000-2006: +.96%

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Michigan:

2005: 10,100,833

2006: 10,095,643

Net Loss: -5,190

Percent Change 2005-2006: -.05%

2000: 9,938,444

2006: 10,095,643

Net Gain: +157,199

Percent Change 2000-2006: +1.55%

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Source: http://www.michigan.gov/hal/0,1607,7-160-1...65068--,00.html

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No, those demographics don't come out until we get the latest city estimates (2006) in July, I believe.

What is worrisome about this is that it's showing that those leaving Detroit, are helping further the sprawl northwards. If fast exploding Canton (probably around 90,000, now), Novi, etc...aren't offsetting this, it points to people fleeing further north or out of the state entirely.

That said, it really is a readjustment, and should come as no surprise.

I was kind of surprised to see the Census predicting that my metro area actually stagnated, last year. And, unlike Detroit where it's both Detroit and its inner-ring suburbs losing, in the case of Lansing, the stagnation is almost entirely a result of Lansing losing.

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Livingston may be "growing" but Oakland is not. Get my drift?

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Wayne County is:

Home to three major airports and one of the nation's busiest marine ports

Home to the first traffic light in the country

Home to the largest boat marina in the country [bell Isle's Detroit Yacht Club]

The potato chip capital of the world

Home to the oldest state fair in the nation, held first in 1849

The softball capital of the world

Home to the largest Arab American population in the country

Home to the first freeway in the country [Davison Freeway]

The only geographical place where Canada is south of the U.S.

The birthplace of the Motown sound, founded by Berry Gordy

Home of the fifth-largest library system in the country [Detroit Public Library]

A partner in the first auto traffic tunnel between two nations, the Detroit-Windsor tunnel [1923]

Home to the largest annual fireworks display in North America

Home of the tallest hotel in North America, the Detroit Marriot Renaissance Hotel

Home of the largest NAACP membership in the country

Host to the largest free jazz festival in North America, the Ford Detroit International Jazz Festival

Home to two IMAX theaters

Home to the "Boston Cooler"

Home of the typewriter, patented in 1829 by Detroiter William Austin Burt

Home of the first paved mile of concrete highway, along Woodward Avenue

A bowling mecca, with the most registered bowlers in the U.S.

Home to the largest building ever moved on wheels [the Gem Theater] in 1999

waynecounty.com

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It looks like ill-effects of Detroit's sprawl are finally catching up with it. It's scary to think that Livingston County is going to soon have close to 200,000 persons with only one or two incorporated cities over 10,000, and barely over that mark, at that.

BTW, Michi, I'm not really sure what any of that means.

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Thanks for those numbers, Lmich. It's interesting to see the outmigration in just the last year. Clearly people aren't just relocating to Livingston County...

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At the same time, and taking into account the economy, it's surprising that Michigan has shown any growth, at all, since 2000. Places like Metro Cleveland and Metro Pittsburgh, with better economies (if only slightly in some cases) continue to lose population from their metros.

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