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krazeeboi

Triad Population Statistics

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Surprisingly, I haven't seen anything about the new Census estimates that came out last week, so I just decided to go ahead and start a thread about that. Here are the 2006 Triad county estimates compared with the 2005 figures (someone let me know if I left any counties out):

Alamance County

2006: 142,661

2005: 140,227

Actual change: 2,434

% change: 1.7

Caswell County

2006: 23,546

2005: 23,490

Actual change: 56

% change: 0.2

Davidson County

2006: 156,236

2005: 154,533

Actual change: 1,703

% change: 1.1

Davie County

2006: 40,035

2005: 39,015

Actual change: 1,020

% change: 2.6

Forsyth County

2006: 332,355

2005: 325,726

Actual change: 6,629

% change: 2.0

Guilford County

2006: 451,905

2005: 443,539

Actual change: 8,366

% change: 1.9

Randolph County

2006: 140,410

2005: 138,176

Actual change: 2,234

% change: 1.6

Rockingham County

2006: 93,063

2005: 92,504

Actual change: 559

% change: 0.6

Stokes County

2006: 46,168

2005: 45,790

Actual change: 378

% change: 0.8

Surry County

2006: 72,687

2005: 72,422

Actual change: 265

% change: 0.4

Yadkin County

2006: 38,056

2005: 37,689

Actual change: 367

% change: 1.0

Now, here are 2006 MSA figures compared with 2000 figures:

Greensboro-High Point

2006: 685,378

2000: 643,430

Actual change: 41,948

% change: 6.5%

Winston-Salem

2006: 456,614

2000: 421,961

Actual change: 34,653

% change: 8.2%

Greensboro--Winston-Salem--High Point CSA

2006: 1,513,576

2000: 1,414,670

Actual change: 98,906

% change: 7.0%

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After hearing/reading various news articles on the census number, I'm not really surprised. The Triad is indeed growing at a solid pace, just not "booming." I thought the growth rate would be a bit higher in Forsyth and Davie, even though they did have the highest growth rates in the region.

I think with the re-focusing of the local area on bringing "less traditional" industries (bio-tech, aviation, etc.) to the Triad and the successes they've had, we will see continued solid growth well into the future.

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These days, I'm not sure if you can call biotech a "less traditional" industry (although I know what you mean). Everybody and their momma wants in on biotech it seems.

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These days, I'm not sure if you can call biotech a "less traditional" industry (although I know what you mean). Everybody and their momma wants in on biotech it seems.

I think everyone can have a piece of the biotech pie, but it helps if you can carve a "niche" out. In the Triad they are pursuing a design spin on biotech. The local universities, community colleges, and governments are all pretty much in support. This is also one of the reasons Forsyth Technical Community College in Winston-Salem is the lead institution for the "National Center for the Biotechnology Workforce." The institution has been recognized for its efforts in retraining workers for positions in this industry.

Website for the National Center for the Biotechnology Workforce

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^That's definitely a feather in Winston-Salem's cap.

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These days, I'm not sure if you can call biotech a "less traditional" industry (although I know what you mean). Everybody and their momma wants in on biotech it seems.

'Everybody and their momma', thanks for the morning laugh. :D Yeah, many places are clamoring for high tech industries in general, and I think the Triad would be remiss if it were not making serious efforts in that. If we can assume this industry in the future will be similar in size and importance to major industries of today then it is simple future oriented common sense. It is great for the state as a whole that the Triangle has had a ~40 year head start and should be an easier "sell" for efforts in the Triad and CLT to do well given their proximity to the Triangle.

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New figures from the U.S. Census Bureau show that Forsyth County grew at a steady pace from 2006 to 2007, almost matching the North Carolina average of 2.2 percent in year-over-year growth.

The new estimates put Forsyth County

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looks like Guilford is matching the state

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That is cool. Thanks for sharing.

What about numbers for Alamance, Randolph, and Rockingham? Do they have those available?

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Here you go.... Comes up to about a 2.4% increase for Alamance over the past year... 11.1% since 2000.

County POPESTIMATE2000 POPEST2001 POPEST2002 POPEST2003 POPEST2004 POPEST2005 POPESTIMATE2006 POPESTIMATE2007

Alamance 131500 133521 135458 136276 138056 139851 141965 145360

Randolph 131029 132264 133312 134423 135274 136938 138674 140145

Rockingham 91964 92042 92459 92276 91785 91892 92160 92421

That is cool. Thanks for sharing.

What about numbers for Alamance, Randolph, and Rockingham? Do they have those available?

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2.4% growth in Alamance County :shades:. We might break 150,000 by the census. Hopefully this growth will continue to be in the central part of the county between Burlington and Mebane.

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2.4% growth in Alamance County :shades:. We might break 150,000 by the census. Hopefully this growth will continue to be in the central part of the county between Burlington and Mebane.

I am sorry but the future of Alamance looks to be mostly commuter traffic. It is in the envious spot between to growing metro areas. I think the east side of the county will outpace the westside as people from the Triangle venture out to find better deals and virgin land. As for the west side Greensboro has been growing at a nice pace so it has a very stable market so there really isn't a need to invade Alamance at this time. All of this could change when developers realize what a great location the county is. Alamance you are the hidden link between the Triad and Triangle.

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All of this could change when developers realize what a great location the county is. Alamance you are the hidden link between the Triad and Triangle.

I think they already have. ;) The area between Buckhorn Road in Orange County and NC 119 on 40/85 is poised to become a continuation of the strip-mall and cheap retail crap that already exists between University Drive and Maple Avenue. In recent years, you have had a Holiday Inn Express, Cracker Barrel, Ruby Tuesday's, Lowes Home Improvement, Hampton Inn, and an apartment complex open up along NC 119. This in itself has lead to the creation of more starter-home developments in this one particular area. I can't even begin to imagine the growth the new Tanger outlet center and Buckhorn Village will jumpstart in East Alamance.

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Greensboro-High Point MSA: 698,497

Winston-Salem MSA: 463,159

Triad CSA: 1,535,926

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You'd actually be surprised how many people commute from western Alamance County/eastern Guilford to the Triangle area for work. I guess the arguement is "what's adding an extra 10 minutes?". I remember a while back in a post that someone stated that the 85/40 corridor could become the daily gridlock that I-95 is in NoVA. I doubt this will happen given the sheer number people commuting to the millions of jobs in WDC vs. the Triad and Triangle, combined. From what I remember, traffic is thick during rush hour, but bearable until you hit western/southwestern Durham on I-40.

I think the east side of the county will outpace the westside as people from the Triangle venture out to find better deals and virgin land. As for the west side Greensboro has been growing at a nice pace so it has a very stable market so there really isn't a need to invade Alamance at this time.

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I was the one who was stuck in traffic from DC to Richmond VA with NO accidents on I-95 :mellow:. I no longer believe I-85/I-40 will see the same traffic problems that NoVa has simply because of gas prices and the poor economy. One major factor that causes traffic jams is some functionality problems in traffic flow such as lane reductions and overloaded interchanges. None of these issues are a problem now. with 2 I-85/40s going through Greensboro. Yes traffic is very thick daily between I-840 and the I 85/40 split but it flows. If Alamance County can ever increase its job base (Honda, Labcorp, someone new?) then traffic might become a problem. Hopefully Alamance county we'll see commuter rail stations in Gibsonville, Elon, Burlington, and Mebane one day to help out with commutes to Guilford county and the Triangle.

I think the east side of the county will outpace the westside as people from the Triangle venture out to find better deals and virgin land. As for the west side Greensboro has been growing at a nice pace so it has a very stable market so there really isn't a need to invade Alamance at this time.
visit eastern Guildford and western Alamance and make sure you drive along US 70, Burlington has already begun or has developed to its annexation agreement line with Greensboro which is roughly right at exit 135. I know the trend is the opposite of Greensboro invading Burlington but there both related.

All of this could change when developers realize what a great location the county is. Alamance you are the hidden link between the Triad and Triangle

Visit the town of Swepsonville and Saxaphaw in southwestern Alamance County alot of the growth their is geared towards Orange County commuters. You'd be suprised at the amount of subdivisions (sprawl) you see while driving down NC 54 towards Chapel Hill.

The one thing that will jump start growth and lead to Mebane growing out of control is the 119 Bypass. This 4 lane divided road will take people from the subdivisions in north Mebane straight to the interstate as quick as possible. It will also plow through the wetlands of Graham-Mebane lake, a minority neighborhood in west Mebane, and the Historic Cates Farm.

One good thing that is coming from all of this new growth is the new Alamance Regional Medical Center in Mebane which was is being built mainly because the developer agreed to build it only if the large retail and residential component was approved with it.

Edited by Creasy336

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Thanks for the numbers. I believe Alamance county is going to continue to see more and more growth. It is well situated.

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I believe I was the one who stated that we could possibly see 40/85 turn into our own smaller version of NoVa's 95. As the Triad (Greensboro specifically) tries to move to a distributing and logistics economy, this will put an even greater amount of trucks and vehicles on this stretch of road. Throw in the fact that this interstate connects us with Atlanta and northern cities as well and you have a fairly busy road at almost all hours of the day. I could realistically see DOT adding 2 more lanes (including HOV) in 2030+ between Mount Hope Church in Guilford and the split in Orange to accomodate more truck and commuter traffic.

You are very right about the growth that is starting to occur along 54. I usually take this road as a shortcut to Chapel Hill and have started to notice subdivisions popping up on what was once farmland.

I was the one who was stuck in traffic from DC to Richmond VA with NO accidents on I-95 :mellow: . I no longer believe I-85/I-40 will see the same traffic problems that NoVa has simply because of gas prices and the poor economy. One major factor that causes traffic jams is some functionality problems in traffic flow such as lane reductions and overloaded interchanges. None of these issues are a problem now. with 2 I-85/40s going through Greensboro. Yes traffic is very thick daily between I-840 and the I 85/40 split but it flows. If Alamance County can ever increase its job base (Honda, Labcorp, someone new?) then traffic might become a problem. Hopefully Alamance county we'll see commuter rail stations in Gibsonville, Elon, Burlington, and Mebane one day to help out with commutes to Guilford county and the Triangle.

visit eastern Guildford and western Alamance and make sure you drive along US 70, Burlington has already begun or has developed to its annexation agreement line with Greensboro which is roughly right at exit 135. I know the trend is the opposite of Greensboro invading Burlington but there both related.

Visit the town of Swepsonville and Saxaphaw in southwestern Alamance County alot of the growth their is geared towards Orange County commuters. You'd be suprised at the amount of subdivisions (sprawl) you see while driving down NC 54 towards Chapel Hill.

The one thing that will jump start growth and lead to Mebane growing out of control is the 119 Bypass. This 4 lane divided road will take people from the subdivisions in north Mebane straight to the interstate as quick as possible. It will also plow through the wetlands of Graham-Mebane lake, a minority neighborhood in west Mebane, and the Historic Cates Farm.

One good thing that is coming from all of this new growth is the new Alamance Regional Medical Center in Mebane which was is being built mainly because the developer agreed to build it only if the large retail and residential component was approved with it.

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The Greensboro-High Point metro area added 11,740 residents from mid 2006 to mid 2007, for a gain of 1.7 percent in one year.

The metro area ranked 92nd by percentage of growth and 53rd nationally by actual growth in the number of residents.

The GSO metro area had an estimated population of 698,497 as of July 1, 2007 which ranked 72nd nationally. The Census Bureau

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Winston-Salem Mayor Allen Joines said that the city may challenge new U.S. Census Bureau estimates that peg the city's population at 215,348 as of July 1, 2007.

The new estimates released last night leave Winston-Salem in fifth place among North Carolina cities, right behind Durham. Durham's population is 217,847, according to the new estimates.

But state and local officials believe that the new figures underestimate Winston-Salem's population. State Demographer Bill Tillman's office estimated Winston-Salem's 2006 population at 221,014 within the boundaries as of July 1, 2007. Joines quoted an even higher figure from City-County Planning Director Paul Norby: about 228,500 as of March this year.

Charlotte easily kept its place atop the list of North Carolina's largest cities, with a 2007 population of 671,588. Raleigh followed with 375,806, and Greensboro was in third place with 247,183.

Mayor says Census Underestimated Winston's Population

Edited by DCMetroRaleigh

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I applaud the mayor for standing up for his city. At times it appears that the state is against Winston-Salem although we are one of its most important major assets. It is important to not let this go because it means plenty of due money the city will not be given forcing them to cut jobs or raise taxes

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...at times, try at every turn; this is just too obviously what it really is. Good for the W-S Mayor; I hope he succeeds.

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Whats going on with Durham and Winston-Salem? you guys are playing cat and mouse. For the second time Durham surpasses Winston-Salem in population.

http://www.myfox8.com/news/wghp-story-durham-pop-101123,0,4525317.story

Tier 1 cities in North Carolina

1) Charlotte (729,781)

2) Raleigh (426,708)

3) Greensboro (260,927)

4) Durham (237,214)

5) Winston-Salem (234,268)

Tier 2 cities in North Carolina

6) Fayetteville (175,494)

7) Cary (136,637)

8) High Point (103,396)

9) Wilmington (102,000)

10) Asheville (76,819)

Greensboro better keep its eye on Durham before it creeps up on the Gate City. Greensboro has held the number 3 spot for decades and the city has been really good at mass annexations over the years to protect its populational ranking. When Winston-Salem annexed about 20,000 people, Greensboro retaliated a few years later annexing almost 18,000 people. City Hall in Greensboro does not want to see Winston-Salem take over Greensboro's position as the largest city in the Triad. Its just part of the constant battling between the two cities which is quite common in other multi-city metros like Greenville and Spartanburg. Everybody wants to be King of the Hill.

Edited by cityboi

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