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South Carolina Metro Population

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Using the 2003 Census Estimates and the new Metropolitan/Micropolitain/CSA Definitions I have compiled the population for all of the Metro Areas, Micro Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas that are in South Carolina.

This excludes the following areasthat are affiliated with Augusta, GA, and Charlotte, NC:

Aiken County, Edgefield County, York County

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

State of SC: 4,147,152

Metropolitan Statistical Areas

Anderson metro-------------------------171,510

Principal City: Anderson

Anderson County------171,510

Charleston-North Charleston metro---571,631

Principal City: Charleston, North Charleston

Berkeley County------ ------------------146,449

Charleston County---- ------------------321,014

Dorchester County----------------------104,168

Columbia metro-------------------------671,407

Principal City: Columbia

Calhoun County---------------------------15,367

Fairfield County---------------------------23,840

Kershaw County--------------------------54,481

Lexington County------------------------226,528

Richland County-------------------------332,104

Saluda County-----------------------------19,087

Florence MSA-----------------------------196,291

Principal City: Florence

Darlington County-------------------------67,956

Florence County--------------------------128,335

Greenville metro-------------------------578,485

Principal City: Greenville

Greenville County-----------------------395,357

Laurens County---------------------------70,269

Pickens County--------------------------112,859

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach metro---210,757

Principal City: Myrtle Beach, Conway, North Myrtle Beach

Horry County----------------------------210,757

Spartanburg metro----------------------261,281

Principal City: Spartanburg

Spartanburg County---------------------261,281

Sumter metro----------------------------105,957

Principal City: Sumter

Sumter County---------------------------105,957

Micropolitan Statistical Areas

Bennetsville micro------------------------28,411

Principal City: Bennetsville

Marlboro County--------------------------28,411

Chester micro-----------------------------33,906

Principal City: Chester

Chester County---------------------------33,906

Dillon micro--------------------------------31,027

Principal City: Dillon

Dillon County------------------------------31,027

Gaffney micro-----------------------------53,555

Principal City: Gaffney

Cherokee County-------------------------53,555

Georgetown micro------------------------58,924

Principal City: Georgetown

Georgetown County----------------------58,924

Greenwood micro-------------------------67,461

Principal City: Greenwood

Greenwood County-----------------------67,461

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort------------153,887

Principal City: Hilton Head Island, Beaufort

Beaufort County-------------------------132,889

Jasper County-----------------------------20,998

Lancaster micro---------------------------62,520

Principal City: Lancaster

Lancaster County-------------------------62,520

Newberry micro---------------------------36,840

Principal City: Newberry

Newberry County-------------------------36,840

Orangeburg micro------------------------91,028

Principal City: Orangeburg

Orangeburg County----------------------91,028

Seneca micro-----------------------------68,523

Principal City: Seneca

Oconee County---------------------------68,523

Union micro-------------------------------29,105

Principal City: Union

Union County-----------------------------29,105

Walterboro micro-------------------------39,173

Principal City: Walterboro

Colleton County--------------------------39,173

Combined Statistical Areas

Columbia-Newberry CSA--------------708,247

Columbia Metro-------------------------671,407

Newberry Micro--------------------------36,840

Greenville-Anderson CSA--------------818,518

Anderson Metro-------------------------171,510

Greenville Metro------------------------578,485

Seneca Micro-----------------------------68,523

Myrtle Beach-Conway-Georgetown CSA---269,681

Georgetown Micro------------------------58,924

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach Metro---210,757

Spartanburg-Gaffney-Union CSA------343,941

Gaffney Micro-----------------------------53,555

Spartanburg Metro----------------------261,281

Union Micro--------------------------------29,105

**The Upstate Metros' total population is 1,229,920 --- 1.2 million! ---

(Greenville CSA, Spartanburg CSA, and Greenwood Micro)

*This is not an official area, but an area that is commonly referred to as a major metro in the USA because the old MSA counties included a less divided area:

Anderson, Greenville, and Spartanburg Counties. These are the Major population centers of the Upstate.

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Guest donaltopablo

Any chance you calculated the growth from 2000 for these areas as well? I never really looked hard at the numbers, but I've been curious how well the Greensville-Spartanburg area grown. I remember visiting Spartanburg 10+ years ago when I first moved to Atlanta and I've got to say, there is a hell of a difference.

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Here are the growth numbers and percentages from 2000-2003 for the major metros in SC. Most other metros/micros in SC are just one county and you can find their change numbers and percentages here.

Greenville-Anderson CSA

Greenville County----------------15,725----- 4.1%

Laurens County----------------------736------1.1%

Pickens County--------------------2,102------1.9%

Anderson County------------------5,770------3.5%

Oconee County--------------------2,308------3.5%

Total-------------------------------26,641------3.3%

Spartanburg-Gaffney-Union CSA

Spartanburg County---------------7,499------3.0%

Union County----------------------- -776---- -2.6%

Cherokee County------------------1,018------1.9%

Total---------------------------------7,741------2.2%

Columbia-Newberry CSA

Richland County------------------11,427------3.6%

Saluda County----------------------- -94----- -0.5%

Newberry County --------------------732------2.0%

Lexington County-----------------10,514------4.9%

Fairfield County ----------------------386------1.6%

Kershaw County -------------------1,834------ 3.5%

Calhoun County ---------------------182-------1.2%

Total--------------------------------24,981-----3.5%

Charleston-North Charleston Metro

Charleston County ---------------11,054------3.6%

Berkeley County ------------------3,798-------2.7%

Dorchester County-----------------7,807-------8.1%

Total-------------------------------22,659-------4.0%

----------------------

Some other interesting facts:

3 Fastest growing counties by numbers:::: by percentage:

1- Greenville County --------15,725::::::::: 1- Beaufort County --- 9.9%

2- Horry County--------------14,128::::::::: 2- York County -------- 8.2%

3- York County---------------13,447::::::::: 3- Horry County ------- 7.2%

3 Slowest growing counties by numbers::: by percentage

1- Williamsburg County------ -1209:::::::: 1- Williamsburg County --- -3.2%

2- Union County--------------- -776::::::::: 2- Union County ----------- -2.6%

3- Orangeburg County ------- -481::::::::: 3- Marlboro County ------- -1.4%

*I think it is noteworthy to mention that all of these counties except for Orangeburg do not have direct access to an interstate within the county.

5 Largest Counties:

1- Greenville --------- 395,357

2- Richland ----------- 332,104

3- Charleston --------- 321,014

4- Spartanburg ------- 261,281

5- Lexington ---------- 226,528

5 Smallest Counties:

46- McCormick----------- 10,233

45- Allendale ------------ 10,934

44- Calhoun ------------- 15,367

43- Bamberg ------------ 16,040

42- Saluda---------------- 19,087

*I think it is noteworthy to mention that all of these counties except for Calhoun also do not have direct access to an interstate within the county.

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Absolutely- Infact, NC and SC are looking to extend I-73 to Myrtle Beach. I think Congress recently approved federal money to do a study on it or something to that effect.

I think they should extend I-20 from Florence though.

-As for Rock Hill, it is technically the 5th largest city. The order is*:

1- Columbia - 116,278

2- Charleston - 96,650

3- North Charleston - 79,641

4- Greenville - 56,002

5- Rock Hill - 49,765

6- Mount Pleasant - 47,609

7- Spartanburg - 39,673

8- Sumter - 39,643

9- Hilton Head Island 33,862

10- Florence - 30,248

It thould be noted that this rank is according to population within the city limits. To me, in SC it is more important to look at urban area population rather than population within the city limits. This is because SC's annexation laws are very strict, and expansion is very difficult.

Urban Area Rankings*:

1- Charleston--North Charleston, SC Urbanized Area - 423,410

2- Columbia, SC Urbanized Area - 420,537

3- Greenville, SC Urbanized Area - 302,194

4- Spartanburg, SC Urbanized Area - 145,058

5- Anderson, SC Urbanized Area - 70,436

6- Rock Hill, SC Urbanized Area - 70,007

7- Florence, SC Urbanized Area - 67,314

8- Sumter, SC Urbanized Area - 64,320

9- Beaufort, SC Urban Cluster - 46,227

10- Hilton Head Island, SC Urban Cluster - 34,400

In my opinion the Urban Area is a better representation of a city's true size.

*All populations are from the Census 2000.

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Yep- Myrtle Beach is the number one tourist destination in South Carolina and possibly the Carolinas with something like $5billion in tourism annually.

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Using the 2003 Census Estimates and the new Metropolitan/Micropolitain/CSA Definitions I have compiled the population for all of the Metro Areas, Micro Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas that are in South Carolina.

This excludes the following areasthat are affiliated with Augusta, GA, and Charlotte, NC:

Aiken County, Edgefield County, York County

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

State of SC: 4,147,152

Metropolitan Statistical Areas

Anderson metro-------------------------171,510

Principal City: Anderson

Anderson County------171,510

Charleston-North Charleston metro---571,631

Principal City: Charleston, North Charleston

Berkeley County------ ------------------146,449

Charleston County---- ------------------321,014

Dorchester County----------------------104,168

Columbia metro-------------------------671,407

Principal City: Columbia

Calhoun County---------------------------15,367

Fairfield County---------------------------23,840

Kershaw County--------------------------54,481

Lexington County------------------------226,528

Richland County-------------------------332,104

Saluda County-----------------------------19,087

Florence MSA-----------------------------196,291

Principal City: Florence

Darlington County-------------------------67,956

Florence County--------------------------128,335

Greenville metro-------------------------578,485

Principal City: Greenville

Greenville County-----------------------395,357

Laurens County---------------------------70,269

Pickens County--------------------------112,859

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach metro---210,757

Principal City: Myrtle Beach, Conway, North Myrtle Beach

Horry County----------------------------210,757

Spartanburg metro----------------------261,281

Principal City: Spartanburg

Spartanburg County---------------------261,281

Sumter metro----------------------------105,957

Principal City: Sumter

Sumter County---------------------------105,957

Micropolitan Statistical Areas

Bennetsville micro------------------------28,411

Principal City: Bennetsville

Marlboro County--------------------------28,411

Chester micro-----------------------------33,906

Principal City: Chester

Chester County---------------------------33,906

Dillon micro--------------------------------31,027

Principal City: Dillon

Dillon County------------------------------31,027

Gaffney micro-----------------------------53,555

Principal City: Gaffney

Cherokee County-------------------------53,555

Georgetown micro------------------------58,924

Principal City: Georgetown

Georgetown County----------------------58,924

Greenwood micro-------------------------67,461

Principal City: Greenwood

Greenwood County-----------------------67,461

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort------------153,887

Principal City: Hilton Head Island, Beaufort

Beaufort County-------------------------132,889

Jasper County-----------------------------20,998

Lancaster micro---------------------------62,520

Principal City: Lancaster

Lancaster County-------------------------62,520

Newberry micro---------------------------36,840

Principal City: Newberry

Newberry County-------------------------36,840

Orangeburg micro------------------------91,028

Principal City: Orangeburg

Orangeburg County----------------------91,028

Seneca micro-----------------------------68,523

Principal City: Seneca

Oconee County---------------------------68,523

Union micro-------------------------------29,105

Principal City: Union

Union County-----------------------------29,105

Walterboro micro-------------------------39,173

Principal City: Walterboro

Colleton County--------------------------39,173

Combined Statistical Areas

Columbia-Newberry CSA--------------708,247

Columbia Metro-------------------------671,407

Newberry Micro--------------------------36,840

Greenville-Anderson CSA--------------818,518

Anderson Metro-------------------------171,510

Greenville Metro------------------------578,485

Seneca Micro-----------------------------68,523

Myrtle Beach-Conway-Georgetown CSA---269,681

Georgetown Micro------------------------58,924

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach Metro---210,757

Spartanburg-Gaffney-Union CSA------343,941

Gaffney Micro-----------------------------53,555

Spartanburg Metro----------------------261,281

Union Micro--------------------------------29,105

**The Upstate Metros' total population is 1,229,920 --- 1.2 million! ---

(Greenville CSA, Spartanburg CSA, and Greenwood Micro)

*This is not an official area, but an area that is commonly referred to as a major metro in the USA because the old MSA counties included a less divided area:

Anderson, Greenville, and Spartanburg Counties. These are the Major population centers of the Upstate.

Iv'e seen the Greenville CSA listed at 1,162,459 for the year of 2003.

Thought that would make you guys happy in the Upstate!

It still doesn't look that big though?

All Upstate communities should consolidate into one (ie Greenville, Anderson, Spartanburg, Greer, Peidmont, Duncan, etc.) & rename it Upstate just like USC Spartanburg did.

That's basically what North Carolina has done with the Triangle & Triad.

If the Midlands did that its population would be: 1,088,808.

Oh well just some fun with numbers.

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There are so many ways that you can look at population and growth figures. If you've spent alot of time in South Carolina you really can't doubt that Columbia feels like the largest city by far.

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Greenville feels pretty crowded at times. Especially from 5:30 to 6:00 on I-85 from Pelham to Woodruff Rd. I have been in standstill traffic there. Of course most of the people in the surrounding areas work in Greenville and commute into the city. The majority live in the county outside of the city limits.

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There are so many ways that you can look at population and growth figures. If you've spent alot of time in South Carolina you really can't doubt that Columbia feels like the largest city by far.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

This is true.

Greenville feels pretty crowded at times. Especially from 5:30 to 6:00 on I-85 from Pelham to Woodruff Rd. I have been in standstill traffic there. Of course most of the people in the surrounding areas work in Greenville and commute into the city. The majority live in the county outside of the city limits.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Greenville is a larger city to be sure, but it doesn't have that feel to it. If you've ever been to Greenville then you know traffic can be bad everywhere. I dislike Hayowod Rd around the mall. It can be very frustrating to drive there.

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I personally agree to a certain extent, though others will disagree.

Some of my friends live just off of Haywood Road, and you would be surprised to hear what they think of the traffic there. A couple of them moved to Greenville from DC less than a year ago, and they say that there is absolutely no road here that has the kind of traffic they had to endure up there. What we call a major delay, they say is "making great time." :blink:

So it seems that Upstate traffic jams are just in the eye of the beholder. :)

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Yeah I can't say I've really seen a bad traffic jam anywhere in the Carolinas. I know alot of people say Charlotte is bad but I still think it's manageable? Now Atlanta on the other hand is insane 6-8 lanes (one way) of bumper to bumper traffic on I-85, an hour outside of the cbd at 6Am is just redicuolous. I told my fiance that if we move there we will live very close to where we work. She'll be at a university, I'll be at a hospital so we'll see? Anywayy Haywood roads traffic looks very similair too Harbison Blvd., Broad River Rd., Two Notch Rd. in Columbia or just basically any major road in any fast growing mid-sized city in the south. I used to live right off of Haywood Rd. back in 01-03.

Also when I hung out in DC while back when I was in school in WV, I'd have to agree with your friends. The traffic in the DC metro is pretty thick as well, at least alot more than anything in the Carolinas. Basically it's not just one road that's congested. It's the majority of major roads and highways that are crowded so unless you really know your way around town your gonna have to wait in traffic.

My biggest traffic problem with Greenville when I was living there was I didn't understand why they had a beltway on the southwestern side of the city where the population wasn't that dense? It should have been the northern connector instead going from I-85 from Greer to the I-85 Powdersville area. I used to work in Travelers Rest. So I would drive from Haywood Rd. and take either Laurens Rd. or 385 go through the DT area, Stone Ave. to Poinsette traffic to get too and from work. In Columbia it would be the equivalent of taking Broad River Rd. from Irmo/ St. Andrews all the way to Forest Acres during rush hour. Yeah it was frustrating especially b/c I'm a fast driver! That's why I love the interstate highways (I-77, I-20, I-126/26, & the southeastern beltway) b/c of this in Columbia you are never more than 20 minutes from anywhere in the city!

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I think Woodruff Rd. traffic is worse than Haywood by far. I hate driving down Woodruff Rd. Seems like everything is sprawling that way. Some other bad roads are N. Pleasantburg and Wade Hampton all the way from Greenville to Greer. I avoid those as much as possible.

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Here are some maps illustrating the percent growth in population, actual number change in population, and density of the US.

As you can see Greenville-Spartanburg, Richland-Lexington, and Charelston are the most dense counties in the state.

popden_c4.gif

Percent change in population from 2000-03 are:

Teir 1: York, Horry, Georgetown, Dorchester, & Beaufort Counties at 5-10%. These aren't surprising since they are coastal destinations or a Charlotte suburb.

Teir 2: Greenville, Anderson, Oconee (Upstate), Richland, Lexington, Kershaw (Midlands), & Charleston (Low Country) Counties at 3.3-5%. Again not surprising.

perchg_c1.gif

Finally largest gains in population numbers per county 2000-03:

Greenville (Upstate), York (Charlotte Metro), Richland, Lexington (Midlands), Horry, Charleston, & Beaufort (Coast) at 10,000-150,000.

numchg_c2.gif

In 2025 the census has predicted a gain of about 1million people added to the state's current population but I think it will be more than that b/c census estimates are usually conservative. Anyway if I'm not mistaken the places listed above will have the biggest gains. That's approximately 300,000 people per large metro in about 20 years. GSP will be at about 1.3 million, Cola about 1 million, and Charleston about 1 million. I guess Rock Hill Charlotte by then will be a legit 2 million strong, and Myrtle will probablly be close to 1/2 a million pending the construction of I-73 and the Carolinas By-way influence.

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One thing I will not tolerate is intolerance, there is absolutely no excuse for it!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I completely agree. You don't have to like it, but you should at least tolerate it.

Yeah I can't say I've really seen a bad traffic jam anywhere in the Carolinas. I know alot of people say Charlotte is bad but I still think it's manageable? Now Atlanta on the other hand is insane 6-8 lanes (one way) of bumper to bumper traffic on I-85,  an hour outside of the cbd at 6Am is just redicuolous. I told my fiance that if we move there we will live very close to where we work. She'll be at a university, I'll be at a hospital so we'll see? Anywayy Haywood roads traffic looks very similair too Harbison Blvd., Broad River Rd., Two Notch Rd. in Columbia or just basically any major road in any fast growing mid-sized city in the south. I used to live right off of Haywood Rd. back in 01-03.

My biggest traffic problem with Greenville when I was living there was I didn't understand why they had a beltway on the southwestern side of the city where the population wasn't that dense?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Charlotte traffic is bad..... But its worse in areas that are suburban. Like around Concord Mills and Pineville-St Matthews. I dislike Charlotte's traffic, but it seems like it has a relatively good flow to it. I mean there aren't that many places where the traffic gets clogged up too bad.

I think Harbison Blvd is one of the most horrible traffic jams ever. I make a sincere effort not to go there unless I have to. Haywood just doesn't seem as bad to me. But the difference is that Haywood Rd is not where most of the shopping is for that area. in Irmo and NW Cola, Harbison is it, so naturally thats where everyone goes.

I never understood Greenville's interstates either. 185 and part of 385 make an almost perfect circle, but not around Greenville- its off center. Its more centered around Conestee than Greenville. Seems to me that it would have made more sense to build a loop around to the northern sections....

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Columbia is very lucky where traffic is concerned because of all of the freeways here. With 3 interstates plus SC 277, SC 12 and I-126 and Sumter Highway, we are very lucky.

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Here is another map displaying population percent changes of MSA's from 2000-2003.

The Charleston MSA is leading the state's major MSA's in % change at 4-6%. So I agree with you now Spartan, Charleston may be on the verge of a population boom. I guess it's good to be a mid-sized city in the south near the ocean right now! I suppose the airplane plant and the industry involved with it will take Charleston to the next level soon. The place was already popular, but I guess we'll see?

Anyway Greenville, & Columbia fell in the same teir seeing growth of 2-4%. Last year I believe Greenville's MSA grew 2.68%, while Columbia MSA grew at 2.64%. The classic mega-growth counties of Horry, & York are still the states hot spots in the growth range of 6-17%.

msapopchg00033333.gif

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The problem with Charleston is that there is zero density anywhere. The penninsula is fairly dense, but it has such a small area that its almost irrelevant. I read somewhere that as of this last census more people lived outside the penninsula area than on it. This is partly to do with yankees and other tourists buying up houses for them to use once a year during Spoleto.

I wish both GSP and Columbia could get some of Charlotte's energy. I think that by the next census they will.

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The problem with Charleston is that there is zero density anywhere. The penninsula is fairly dense, but it has such a small area that its almost irrelevant. I read somewhere that as of this last census more people lived outside the penninsula area than on it. This is partly to do with yankees and other tourists buying up houses for them to use once a year during Spoleto.

I wish both GSP and Columbia could get some of Charlotte's energy. I think that by the next census they will.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'm curious what do you mean exactly by Charlotte's energy? Are you referring to it's economic, developmental, population, energy?

I think personally Columbia, Greenville, or Charleston are able to reach the level that Charlotte is on today. All of the major SC metros today are in striking distance of Charlotte's population 20-30 years ago. I also think that the SC metros are at an advantage for coming in later in the game b/c we have the ability to learn from the ATL, & NC's sprawltropolis mistakes, as long as we plan carefully. I understand that there is sprawl in Greenville& Spartanburg but there is alot of undeveloped land there that can be managed b/f it turns into suburban ATL, CLT, or RDU. I know Richland County has incorporated the town & country act to curb sprawl in growing areas, especially Richland NE. Lexington County on the other hand I believe is heading in the sprawltopolis direction b/c there is so much undeveloped land there. I drove out to Red Bank to get a picture of the skyline from White Knoll HS, and noticed even way out there of off I-20 the sprawling construction of gas stations, road widening, drug stores, and shopping centers.

I can see more people living outside of the peninsula than on it. Charleston has so much preservation on the peninsula so I assume it's to complicated and expensive to build new developments down there. I think N. Charleston will probablly reach 100,000 or be close to it by 2010, but then again I could be wrong. What is it like 85K now?

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...I think personally Columbia, Greenville, or Charleston are able to reach the level that Charlotte is on today. All of the major SC metros today are in striking distance of Charlotte's population 20-30 years ago. I also think that the SC metros are at an advantage for coming in later in the game b/c we have the ability to learn from the ATL, & NC's sprawltropolis mistakes, as long as we plan carefully. I understand that there is sprawl in Greenville& Spartanburg but there is alot of undeveloped land there that can be managed b/f it turns into suburban ATL, CLT, or RDU...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yes, around Greenville there are a few new "cluster" neighborhoods being built, which should help to ease the effect of urban sprawl on the natural habitat and beauty of the land. However, for every one of those smart developments, there are at least 5-10 others within a couple miles range that are the typical suburban sprawling subdivision, engulfing the entire landscape. :unsure:

It really scares me when I think about it, because there are literally so many new housing developments currently developing everywhere in the Upstate, that I see absolutely no way that we can possibly avoid becoming as sprawling as the other large cities close by. :( I mean, you will find it virtually impossible to locate a road anywhere on the outskirts of suburbia here, where land is not being graded, or new subdivisions not being built. It was already hard to find where one suburb ended and the next began.

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I'm curious what do you mean exactly by Charlotte's energy? Are you referring to it's economic, developmental, population, energy?

I think personally Columbia, Greenville, or Charleston are able to reach the level that Charlotte is on today. All of the major SC metros today are in striking distance of Charlotte's population 20-30 years ago. I also think that the SC metros are at an advantage for coming in later in the game b/c we have the ability to learn from the ATL, & NC's sprawltropolis mistakes, as long as we plan carefully. I understand that there is sprawl in Greenville& Spartanburg but there is alot of undeveloped land there that can be managed b/f it turns into suburban ATL, CLT, or RDU. I know Richland County has incorporated the town & country act to curb sprawl in growing areas, especially Richland NE. Lexington County on the other hand I believe is heading in the sprawltopolis direction b/c there is so much undeveloped land there. I drove out to Red Bank to get a picture of the skyline from White Knoll HS, and noticed even way out there of off I-20 the sprawling construction of gas stations, road widening, drug stores, and shopping centers.

I can see more people living outside of the peninsula than on it. Charleston has so much preservation on the peninsula so I assume it's to complicated and expensive to build new developments down there. I think N. Charleston will probablly reach 100,000 or be close to it by 2010, but then again I could be wrong. What is it like 85K now?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I mean all of the above. Charlotte is developing at a fantastic rate, but it seems to me that it is somewhat controlled, and it is somewhat forward thinking. They seem to be attempting to be progressive with the LRT/BRT plans. The interstate loop seems like its being built more because its what is fasionable than what is necessary. But I don't live there so maybe it is. I do know that it will be nice to use 485 when I go to Carowinds :)

I think that it won't be as successful at first because people are scared of new things, and aren't really sure what to do with it. I heard an interesting conversation last Friday while I was up there on 99.3 about the HOV lanes. People kept calling in about how they weren't really sure what to do with them or complaining about cops concentrating on the people using HOV lanes incorrectly...

Slightly off topic there. My point is that Charlotte is a good place to look to for examples of good and bad, but whatever it is that they are doing must work considering the massive growth in everything. I wouldn't be suprised if Lancaster was added to the MSA before too long.

Columbia, in my opinion, is in a better position that most cities due to the existing rail lines along major traffic routes (for future mass transit), and a defacto interstate loop. The core area is being redeveloped too. There is strong develpoment in Columbia, and the region is making sincere efforts to give the economy the push it needs. But it still lacks the energy of Charlotte.

Greenville is the same. I associate more growth with Greenville/Spartanburg than I do with Columbia. Greenville has more problems that Columbia beucase the Upstate is so spread out. It willl have to deal with growth and commuters too. I view that as its main problem. The fact that so many people in the Upstate commute to and from Greenville. Develompent isn't really a factor. If you've ever been to the Upstate and not seen some construction then you were probably asleep.

Yes, around Greenville there are a few new "cluster" neighborhoods being built, which should help to ease the effect of urban sprawl on the natural habitat and beauty of the land.  However, for every one of those smart developments, there are at least 5-10 others within a couple miles range that are the typical suburban sprawling subdivision, engulfing the entire landscape. :unsure:

It really scares me when I think about it, because there are literally so many new housing developments currently developing everywhere in the Upstate, that I see absolutely no way that we can possibly avoid becoming as sprawling as the other large cities close by. :(  I mean, you will find it virtually impossible to locate a road anywhere on the outskirts of suburbia here, where land is not being graded, or new subdivisions not being built.  It was already hard to find where one suburb ended and the next began.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The difference here is that Greenville's clusters aren't intentional so much. They are intentional in that they were constructed as a cluster, but what Richland COunty hopes to do with its Town & Country plan is generally have areas of very high density and then areas of very low density nearby. The Upstate as a whole lacks any serious effort to control and maintain a uniform system of development. I know that Spartanburg County has no zoning laws to speak of, and I am fairly certain that Greenville County is the same.

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^^ Greenville couinty has zoning, but that does not impede sprawl. No real effort is underway in the upstate to manage growth. The conservative GOP mindset is to give property rights the highest importance. With the new members of county council taking over, there may be more attention to growth management, but I don't expect that the laws and practices to change significantly.

Mostly likely, more damage and congestion will have to occur before the mentality will change in the upstate.

As for Richland, the Town & Country idea has been around for many years, but has it actually been implemented? I got tried of following it, so I don't pay much attention anymore.

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As for Richland, the Town & Country idea has been around for many years, but has it actually been implemented?  I got tried of following it, so I don't pay much attention anymore.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

As far as I know it was made official last year.

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