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nashvillwill

Do you purchase green energy/carbon credits?

   22 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you use optional green power or purchase carbon credits?

    • Yes
      6
    • No
      16
  2. 2. If yes, then which?

    • green energy
      5
    • carbon credits
      0
    • both
      0
    • do not use
      17

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18 posts in this topic

Personally I buy green energy. No particular reason other than it fits into my budget a little better. I purchase 300kwhs per month for $8 monthly. It is only about 30% of my consumption, but I figure that some is better than none. What about you guys?

If you don't know if you use either of these sources and would like to find out more please visit:

carbon offets info;

Native Energy

or

Go Carbon Neutral

greenpower info;

Green Power Switch

or

Green Energy Choice

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I have been hearing more and more about this but I get the sinking feeling that, while it sounds good, that this may be a scam. However, I do feel more and more "guilty" about how much energy I use as a single person (single family home in the burbs, 1 car, 1 thirsty SUV, and I drive 50-60K a year with work(company vehicle.) I think I will watch and research these companies first, and if I feel they're legit and can show results from all us "guilty" Americans paying them money; I'll do it. :thumbsup:

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while it sounds good, that this may be a scam.

I definately encourage you George to be skeptical. I am myself. Honestly, I havn't done much research into the carbon credit side of it all, however I do know that the green energy is pretty legit. They have many non-profit "watchdog" companies keeping tabs to make sure that they actually produce as many green Kwhs as they sell.

But this raises another point. I'm not delusional enough to think that my power company magically redirects only green energy into my home. While I realize that the energy I use comes from the same places that my neighbors does, it's nice to know that I am partially responsible for the advancement and expansion of green energy. While probably only a small percentage of my energy actually comes from green power, now my neighbor can thank me for the small percentage he/she receives as well.

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And another troubling trend of this type of industry, again this is a way for Americans to keep on in their "set ways" with an easy affordable out for those who really "care." While I hate to agree with anything this man says, Rush Limbaugh was talking about these companies on the radio yesterday (just for the record, I detest the man but was trapped with an ultra-conservative co-worker in their car and he thinks he's a god!) and said why don't we have companies that do "calorie credits" for people who don't won't to change their eating habits and feel guilty about it. While that may sound silly, he does have a point, the way this is being marketed make it seems suspect...

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yeah, but keep in mind it is optional, and an extra expense. the kind of people who buy green energy and carbon credits are not the kind of people who leave their lights on all day for no reason. Everyone i know that uses these things already use CFL bulbs, purchase only energy star appliances, and remember to turn the lights off. If a person is not concerned about how much electricity they use, then why would they care where it came from?

Although if Mr. Limbaugh thinks people like me just "feel bad" about how much energy we use, and thinks that energy reduction is the only answer, then i encourage him to start a campaign! Of all people HE has the ability to start such a movement. Although, if people start to really conserve they might even turn off their radio(bye, bye, Rush).

By his logic the only answer is for all of us tree-huggers to quit caring, return all of our energy efficient habits back to energy hogging habits, not feel guilty at all, and continue burning as many fossil fuels as we can possibly consume until utter global destruction! But that won't be our problem right? That's got to be at least...i dunno...50 years from now! Thanks Rush for the brilliant insight. I've been such a fool!

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Well, while he had a point, I do hope the companies offering "carbon credits" are geniune. And who knows, I didn't hear the whole show (I definitely would have been having suicidal thought if that had happened), so I can't really say how he spinned the rest of conversation about this.

As I said before, I am watching these companies. They could be a viable alternative to help offset our "wasteful ways." Even as people become more "eco-conscious", they will not always be able to make big stroke changes at once (trade gas guzzling SUV's/cars for more efficient models, install solar panels, make other energy efficient upgrades to their homes, etc.) Hopefully this will be a successful endeavour.

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george, i know it's been a long time since our conversation concluded, but a recent reemergence of this topic made me want to continue.

yes, your right, i don't expect every american to go out tomorrow and buy a hybrid and install solar panels. it's all about baby steps. if everyone would simply buy 1 CFL(compact flourecent lightbulb) instead of a regular incadescent, and see the benefits, it could start a slow chain reaction. i myself still own a gas guzzling SUV, simpy because i can't afford a new car yet. but since i have recently been turned onto the personal benefits on conservationism, rest assured my next car will be at least 1/3 more efficient than my current.

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We just recently signed up for Consumers Energy's Green Generation Program (under the "For Home" tab) (a local Midwestern energy company). We bought two "blocks" at $2.50 each/month, and these extra blocks go toward local alternative energy providers (because it is more expensive). 65% is going toward wind power, and 35% to biomass.

I think it's a great idea. Don't listen to Rush, just do it. ;)

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george, i know it's been a long time since our conversation concluded, but a recent reemergence of this topic made me want to continue.

yes, your right, i don't expect every american to go out tomorrow and buy a hybrid and install solar panels. it's all about baby steps. if everyone would simply buy 1 CFL(compact flourecent lightbulb) instead of a regular incadescent, and see the benefits, it could start a slow chain reaction. i myself still own a gas guzzling SUV, simpy because i can't afford a new car yet. but since i have recently been turned onto the personal benefits on conservationism, rest assured my next car will be at least 1/3 more efficient than my current.

No, and people can't afford it. I'm glad it's getting more in the national spotlight, especially with the news that the CO2 absortion rate by the ocean has fallen dramatically and is helping to exarcibate global warming.

I have decided to start moving all my light fixtures over to CFL's. I am going to do my outdoor lights and office first, these are the lights that stay on the longest. Then do a room or so a month. I also am looking into purchasing green power from the local electric company. I also am planning to have an energy conversation analysis done at my house by a rep from the power company to help determine other ways to help reduce my energy consumption.

As far as the SUV (as I've said before, I'm extremely guilty there.) I have relegated it to road trips and errands that I need the extra room to haul stuff. Otherwise, I put my errands on the way back from work in my company car or drive my much more fuel efficient convertible. When and if it comes time to trade the SUV, it will be for a far more efficient choice. I'd say I would trade now, but I would lose a boatload in value and the vehicle would still be in the fleet and I would just be increasing demand for production of newer vehicles which require a large investment of resources which really aren't needed.

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GRDad, good for you! i must ask though, of two "blocks" you purchase, how many kwhs are these blocks? cause my blocks are $4 per 150/kwhrs. if your getting the same hours for the $2.50 it's a steal! mine might be more simply based on the technology...wind/solar/methane(landfill)gas. sorry i don't know the percentage. either way, once again, right on!

George, i definately understand your reservations to trading in your old SUV. and your exactly right about giving up a car when it's still an asset to offset production waste. most people don't understand this.

anyways, i looked at a hybrid this weekend. i'm still questioning it's actual environmental benefits(batteries and all) but maybe i'll be getting a new car soon. 60 mpg compared to the 19 mpg i get now. woo-hoo!

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Extremely good article about 'Carbon Offsets.' Offers some pointers and concerns about this 'fledgling' industry. I'm contemplating purchasing green power/carbon credits but it would be thru the power company.

MSNBC Article about the Carbon Offset Industry

thanks for the link. very informative. i definately encourage buying green energy through your power company as this also encourages conservationism. also, most power companies are so regulated that they can't get away with stealing these so called "green" dollars. in the mean time, your link will help me distinct the "real" carbon offset groups from the fake "for profit" ones. once again, thanks George!

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I signed up for the green energy option with National Grid as soon as it became tax deductable, which was last summer for the program I have.

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I signed up for the green energy option with National Grid as soon as it became tax deductable, which was last summer for the program I have.

I just signed up for this. Starting with our next utility bill we're going to have a fixed tax-deductible amount taken out in addition to our standard amount due for amount used. It is through the NC Green Power program and goes 100% towards supporting renewable and sustainable electricity sources for the state.

Unfortunately I don't live in a city that offers to have all of your power come from an existing renewable source (hydro-electric, wind, etc.) so this is the next best thing.

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Purchasing carbon credits reminds me of the Catholic Church selling Indulgences centuries ago. Seems kinda like the same concept to me.

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Purchasing carbon credits reminds me of the Catholic Church selling Indulgences centuries ago. Seems kinda like the same concept to me.

I'm not so much for carbon credits as I am for using your money to invest in clean energy and research in clean energy. I have a set amount deducted from my monthly power bill to invest in clean energy for my state (North Carolina).

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I haven't purchased carbon credits or made the change to buying green power. That said this is a good reminder for me because I'd like to purchase green electricity and will look into it soon!

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For those who may be skeptical, carbon credits are an excellent way to help promote renewable energy. It is, however, a nascent product (relatively speaking), with some pros and cons... Buying from an organization that has a top notch third party auditor is a must and while this may or may not come as a surprise, buying from your utility in no way guarantees that you're cash is going to renewable sources. Florida Power and Light had a green energy voluntary add on option to their monthly customers which ran for a few years and then it was discovered that almost 80% of the revenue taken in by the program went to administrative costs, rather than to any clean energy generation - thus, it's worth doing a little research and maybe even buying from an newer independent organization rather than from your utility. Just my two cents, with a little experience.

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