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Central High School Football History

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Terrific article by Sports Illustrated on the Central High football team in 1957 and the tremendous history of the school.

SI - LR Central

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Terrific article by Sports Illustrated on the Central High football team in 1957 and the tremendous history of the school.

SI - LR Central

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I am a LRCHS Class of 58 graduate and know all the guys in the article. This SI piece is the best thing I've ever read about being a white kid at Central during the 57/58 year.

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Terrific article by Sports Illustrated on the Central High football team in 1957 and the tremendous history of the school.

SI - LR Central

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I haven't finished it....but it seems very well written, and in fact timely to shed a little light on some of the successes of LRH prior to desegregation.

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The last couple of pages are saddening, the story of what happened in 1958. Terrible. I can only imagine how the kids on that team (and school) felt.

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I just finished reading the article...so well written, a moving piece yet unbelievable sad that whole event. Its so clear that it was not the integration of 9 young people, but the bigots and small-mindedness that arguably set back LR 30 years...arguably altering its course forever.

Fortunately, Central High survives relatively intact as one of the best high schools in the country. But Little Rock? Some say it was destined for unparalleled growth until that fateful day....

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Fortunately, Central High survives relatively intact as one of the best high schools in the country. But Little Rock? Some say it was destined for unparalleled growth until that fateful day....

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Well-written article. I got a more thorough understanding of the event. I didn't realize it was as serious as it was. Well I heard it was serious, but the article helped me experience it.

I think Central High has had a profound impact on the city of Little Rock, and it might have been for the better.

What if Central High had been just another one of the faceless high schools across America quietly integrating? Would citizens have quietly acquiesced, but harbored deep resentments...possibly eventually re-segregating on their own? Or is it possible that because this was a defining moment in Central High history that students and their parents made a definitive stand on the issue, some whites consciously choosing to stay enrolled to make a point about racism and equality, and to develop one of the best damn schools in America, that happens to be uniquely diverse?

Little Rock is so unlike other cities of its size in the region, politically, economically, socially, etc. I think it goes without saying that much of this is derived from its unique history. Would the city be much grander if the event had never happened? Perhaps, but I'd doubt it'd be as wise, with its unique culture and perspective in history... When going through downtown Little Rock, you encounter museums of Arkansas history, the behometh of a library, the Museum of Discovery, the Clinton Presidential Center, the Arkansas Studies institute, a tribute to the Korean influence, a (soon to be) game and fish center, an upcoming "global village," and other truly fascinating embodiments of progressive thought. Undoubtedly, you encounter many of these types of institutions in other cities, but for some reason it just doesn't have the same taste. We have a log cabin in downtown Little Rock at our Arkansas history museum; that's not hiding history, that's embracing it. (Then again, maybe I'm getting over-sentimental.) Little Rock has taken the same approach with the Central High crisis, as it should. The crisis should be recognized as a saddening, despicable low-point of humanity, but it should also be utilized as a strongpoint in the development of the character of Little Rock.

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Well-written article. I got a more thorough understanding of the event. I didn't realize it was as serious as it was. Well I heard it was serious, but the article helped me experience it.

I think Central High has had a profound impact on the city of Little Rock, and it might have been for the better.

What if Central High had been just another one of the faceless high schools across America quietly integrating? Would citizens have quietly acquiesced, but harbored deep resentments...possibly eventually re-segregating on their own? Or is it possible that because this was a defining moment in Central High history that students and their parents made a definitive stand on the issue, some whites consciously choosing to stay enrolled to make a point about racism and equality, and to develop one of the best damn schools in America, that happens to be uniquely diverse?

Little Rock is so unlike other cities of its size in the region, politically, economically, socially, etc. I think it goes without saying that much of this is derived from its unique history. Would the city be much grander if the event had never happened? Perhaps, but I'd doubt it'd be as wise, with its unique culture and perspective in history... When going through downtown Little Rock, you encounter museums of Arkansas history, the behometh of a library, the Museum of Discovery, the Clinton Presidential Center, the Arkansas Studies institute, a tribute to the Korean influence, a (soon to be) game and fish center, an upcoming "global village," and other truly fascinating embodiments of progressive thought. Undoubtedly, you encounter many of these types of institutions in other cities, but for some reason it just doesn't have the same taste. We have a log cabin in downtown Little Rock at our Arkansas history museum; that's not hiding history, that's embracing it. (Then again, maybe I'm getting over-sentimental.) Little Rock has taken the same approach with the Central High crisis, as it should. The crisis should be recognized as a saddening, despicable low-point of humanity, but it should also be utilized as a strongpoint in the development of the character of Little Rock.

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Excellent, excellent points my friend. I think you are right...there certainly is much, much more to consider than just the whole public relations aspect of that sad day.

My comment was really based in a lecture from an author who wrote about the event, who noted that Little Rock was VERY progressive for its day, and was growing rapidly and was considered one of the next up-and-coming boom centers of the south, and that the image of the city (and state) was irreparably tarnished by what transpired. She's probably right on the surface. And vbfl85 was correct that in spite of this, Little Rock still grew quite a bit in the 60's and 70's.

But your point is sound, a lot was learned that day, and some times trials create great character both for individuals and societies....Little Rock certainly grew up that day.

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