Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

AvianKeahi

A Stadium Done Right?

20 posts in this topic

Today saw the release of the design for the new Minnesota Twins Baseball Stadium. It will be located on the edge of downtown Minneapolis, about a block away from the city's main entertainment area, the Warehouse District.

What struck me about the design is how well it seems to be integrated into the fabric of the urban core. The press conference given by the architects (HOK Sports) stressed that they considered the integration factor as a primary design issue.

Here are the highlights of the urban design:

The stadium will be easily accessible on foot at the street level. A new entry plaza will be built over the existing spur freeway, I-394, that currently divides the main part of downtown with the northern section of the Warehouse District (which is an area of condominiums).

It will also be connected to the city's extensive "skyway" system: 8 miles of climate controlled walkways through the heart of downtown.

The existing Light Rail "Hiawatha" line will be extended to the stadium. This line currently connects the downtown with the Airport and the Mall of America in Bloomington.

The NorthStar Commuter Rail line, which will extend 30 miles to the northwest suburbs of Minneapolis, will terminate under the 3rd-Base side of the stadium.

The existing Cedar bicycle trail, connecting the western suburbs to the Mississippi River downtown, will skirt the northwest edge of the stadium.

Because the stadium is located over I-394, the existing three large Municipal parking ramps (which funnel traffic directly off of the freeway) will provide much of the available parking, helping to mitigate the need for a lot of additional surface parking.

mntwinspark05hp0.jpg

mntwinspark00yr4.jpg

mntwinspark04rm6.jpg

mntwinspark02rc6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


i think it isagreat park, and I think that it is ina perfect place. Plus, they built centerfield to the view ofthecity which is always wise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks pretty great. I like how it covers part of the freeway, but i can see how that might cause some problems. I also like how it has 4 decks of seats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, very nice renderings. Thanks for the map too. Looks like a great location and great view of the impressive skyline in RF. No retractable roof??? If it snows too much will they play in Milwaukee like Cleveland is currently doing??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL, but Minneapolis doesnt get lake effect snow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, very nice renderings. Thanks for the map too. Looks like a great location and great view of the impressive skyline in RF. No retractable roof??? If it snows too much will they play in Milwaukee like Cleveland is currently doing??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HOK Sports designed the Durham Bulls new stadium. It too is very nicely integrated into Durham's urban fabric, on the edge of the city's American Tobacco district. I prefer this type of plan over the suburban stadium surrounded by parking scenario.

Way to go HOK Sports. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


HOK Sports designed the Durham Bulls new stadium. It too is very nicely integrated into Durham's urban fabric, on the edge of the city's American Tobacco district. I prefer this type of plan over the suburban stadium surrounded by parking scenario.

Way to go HOK Sports. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like HOK. I believe they also designed PNC Park in Pittsburgh, which is similarly well-connected to the city. It has a very nice street-level presence, with retail and restaurants facing out toward the sidewalk. It's connected to the riverfront park and trail, and is open toward the skyline. The new light-rail extension will have a stop nearby too (although that part is the city and county's doing, not HOK's). Oh yes, and the bridge right next to it that connects to downtown is closed to traffic during games so fans can walk across. That really adds to the atmosphere and makes it more fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, it does mesh nicely with its surroundings. It's actually an attractive addition, rare for stadiums, arenas, and the like

Nothing beats the old-timey feel of Wrigley Field, though, IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like HOK. I believe they also designed PNC Park in Pittsburgh, which is similarly well-connected to the city. It has a very nice street-level presence, with retail and restaurants facing out toward the sidewalk. It's connected to the riverfront park and trail, and is open toward the skyline. The new light-rail extension will have a stop nearby too (although that part is the city and county's doing, not HOK's). Oh yes, and the bridge right next to it that connects to downtown is closed to traffic during games so fans can walk across. That really adds to the atmosphere and makes it more fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I definitely like the way new ball parks and stadiums are intigrated into the urban fabric on the edge of the CBD's.

The background with the high-rises in Pittsburgh's PNC Park is as good as any. And right up against the river at the egde with promenade is cool too.

Seattle's Invesco Field has an opening on the north-end with a great view of an impressive skyline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing that doesn't make sense is why the enclosed skywalks? They don't want people to be exposed to the weather to get to the ballpark, so that they can sit outside for a 3 - 4 hour game in that same weather? Other than that, it's a nice design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only thing that doesn't make sense is why the enclosed skywalks? They don't want people to be exposed to the weather to get to the ballpark, so that they can sit outside for a 3 - 4 hour game in that same weather? Other than that, it's a nice design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


pretty amazing, usc is building a college stadium downtown. i wish we had light rail and such but we're just getting started. our downtown has big dreams that will hopefully become a reality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a great park and an awesome place to catch a game. Building parks that are incorporated within the surronding areas and ditching the suburban locations has taken hold in the MLB. Most though try to be a throw back to an older park, trying to replicate Wrigly Field or the like. This one onthe other hand is quite stylish and will make it one of the few to do so. The heated areas and such I would imagine are needed more during the first two weeks in April then in October, even when the Twins make the playoffs. I will have to go visit it when it opens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only stadiums that really fit into the city are old ones in America, like Fenway Park. Many soccer stadiums in Europe are still like that, many aren't. The new urban stadiums in America like the ones posted try to fit in, but are still big bunkers that do not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Autozone Park in Memphis is a good example here:

DSCN0450-2-tm.jpg

I also think the Charlotte Bobcats Arena makes a good attempt at this, with restaurant spaces at street level and an attractive plaza fronting the street:

bobcats_arena_7267.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.