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Richard Lawson

More Sounds fallout

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That's an understatement. When it rains, it pours, and it's pouring down on the Sounds right now. They're in a whole heap of trouble and they're going to have to pull a Houdini trick to get out this mess. Maybe, if they could have foreseen all this, they would have found a way to pay for those construction drawings. Had they done that, they would be in great shape right now.

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I think the Sounds knew this was coming because it has been brought up before. I think the team may be in financial trouble. Seems as if there could be a management change coming as well.

Just an outsiders opinion, who knows what the next move will be.

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Despite the Sounds' missteps, I'll make a prediction that history will not be kind to Purcell when this episode is written (long after the team leaves for greener pastures). IMO there is a gaping (missed) opportunity for the mayor to take a leadership role in brokering a deal for the citizens of Nashville. Instead, Purcell has backpedaled to the point where the Sounds have only one good option: to leave Nashville. That's too bad, since the sting of losing professional baseball will last long after Yeager/Streuver/Purcell have dropped the ball (sorry, pun intended).

Richard, I have wondered since this thing started why Purcell was so averse to guarateeing bonds for the construction of the ballpark. Was it simply a lack of will on his part? If so, then that's tantamount to an admission that he doesn't care about baseball in Nashville (IMO).

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That may be true, brain, but I don't really think losing the Sounds will sting long. Sure, it's fun, it's a cool thing to do for the few who do it, but I don't think Mr. Purcell will suffer consequences because of the loss of this Chicago group leaving town for whatever financially greener (for them) pastures they may find.

I'd love to have baseball here. Do I go? No, not often, if ever. I'm sure many folks would love that. But, the sting to which refer is still being felt in our property tax bills which, since the introduction of pro sports in Nashville have more than doubled (at least mine have). I don't mind what I pay now. As a childless person I pay dearly to send kids to school. Some do it right, some we should relocate to Greenland, but I can wait for this property to be developed by the people who have the money to develop it. Plant some trees, have a picnic. The world's not falling apart because this land is vacant. I would have loved for the ducks to have all lined up and everything promised for the land happened. But, it didn't. Now, there's no rush.

Nashville is an attractive and lucrative market. We shouldn't beg anyone to take our money when it's disguised as the "opportunity of a lifetime." It's our money, and hopefully the investments will be on that which will provide the greatest return, where a civic space or a development from which we'll make much needed money.

The Sounds are run by self-professed big boys. Let them prove it without holding their hands out for City Daddy's cash. It's about time we zipped up the purse a bit.

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Despite the Sounds' missteps, I'll make a prediction that history will not be kind to Purcell when this episode is written (long after the team leaves for greener pastures). IMO there is a gaping (missed) opportunity for the mayor to take a leadership role in brokering a deal for the citizens of Nashville. Instead, Purcell has backpedaled to the point where the Sounds have only one good option: to leave Nashville. That's too bad, since the sting of losing professional baseball will last long after Yeager/Streuver/Purcell have dropped the ball (sorry, pun intended).

Richard, I have wondered since this thing started why Purcell was so averse to guarateeing bonds for the construction of the ballpark. Was it simply a lack of will on his part? If so, then that's tantamount to an admission that he doesn't care about baseball in Nashville (IMO).

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Good insights, all. No doubt the property is very attractive on many levels. As I've said on this forum several times before: Nashville's waterfront is a great asset that COULD be the thing that sets it apart from all the other growing cities in the Southeast with cookie-cutter downtowns. However, that won't happen without leadership starting in the mayor's office.

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I recently spent a weekend in Baltimore and got the chance to see many (i.e. There are blocks of'em!) of SBE&R's developments. They seem to have a penchant for creating and revitalizing entire neighborhoods.

I am hopeful that they will be allowed to help revitalize our little patch of the riverfront.

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I recently spent a weekend in Baltimore and got the chance to see many (i.e. There are blocks of'em!) of SBE&R's developments. They seem to have a penchant for creating and revitalizing entire neighborhoods.

I am hopeful that they will be allowed to help revitalize our little patch of the riverfront.

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You always hate to lose a professional team, but at what cost should you be willing to pay to keep it. Look at the financial responsibility the city absorbed with guarantees to the Titans and the Preds. Owners of both reap all upside. Yes the City gets tax revenues from the events and jobs but there are many individual tax payors who foot the bill and are not interested in sports. The same can be said for things like ballet and the philharmonic. Those that want to partake in a particular entertainment should pay a larger portion of the "tax". I'm a season ticket holder for the Titans but live outside the Nashville city limits. I hear my city friends complain about the tax structure, especially when there is a perceived assessment as in reallocation of budget $$ for scoreboards or security planters at the arenas. If its a no brainer investment to build the stadium, the economics should bear that out and that should attract private investment $$ to build.

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I would really hate for this to turn into a "i'm so over taxed for sports" discussion. I know there are many who may feel that way and they have the right to their opinions, but I and many others are happy with the "entertainment value" delivered by professional sports teams. I pay taxes in Davidson Co. just like everyone else and like my friend Dave, I do not have children and do not mind that a large % of my tax dollars go to pay for education, etc. as it should. In the end I just want some of my tax dollars to benefit me and sports teams work just fine for that. We only hear about team owners lining their pockets, what about the corporate residents who also get big tax incentives to come and do business here? It is all a part of doing business game and I think sports teams get a bad rap like they were the only theives in the den.

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You always hate to lose a professional team, but at what cost should you be willing to pay to keep it. Look at the financial responsibility the city absorbed with guarantees to the Titans and the Preds. Owners of both reap all upside. Yes the City gets tax revenues from the events and jobs but there are many individual tax payors who foot the bill and are not interested in sports. The same can be said for things like ballet and the philharmonic. Those that want to partake in a particular entertainment should pay a larger portion of the "tax". I'm a season ticket holder for the Titans but live outside the Nashville city limits. I hear my city friends complain about the tax structure, especially when there is a perceived assessment as in reallocation of budget $$ for scoreboards or security planters at the arenas. If its a no brainer investment to build the stadium, the economics should bear that out and that should attract private investment $$ to build.

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Seattle's team isn't going anywhere. They just got a new stadium.

And, yes, I know it was a joke, but the Tampa Bay Devil Rays could be had. Pittsburgh Pirates might be available, in spite of their new stadium (in my opinion, the best). Oakland A's could be bought also, but I can see them going to Sacramento some day. The Kansas City Royals need help, also. So there are several possibilities, but the political, economic climate is just not right right now.

Is Nashville on the verge of moving up to the next tier of American Cities? Having both the NFL and MLB would make that statement. We are already near an economic and population level equality with Cincinnati and Kansas City (both have NFL and MLB). But adding Major league Baseball would have us knocking on the doors of the Denvers, Minneapolises and San Diegos for membership in the second tier of America's Cities.

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You always hate to lose a professional team, but at what cost should you be willing to pay to keep it. Look at the financial responsibility the city absorbed with guarantees to the Titans and the Preds. Owners of both reap all upside. Yes the City gets tax revenues from the events and jobs but there are many individual tax payors who foot the bill and are not interested in sports. The same can be said for things like ballet and the philharmonic. Those that want to partake in a particular entertainment should pay a larger portion of the "tax". I'm a season ticket holder for the Titans but live outside the Nashville city limits. I hear my city friends complain about the tax structure, especially when there is a perceived assessment as in reallocation of budget $$ for scoreboards or security planters at the arenas. If its a no brainer investment to build the stadium, the economics should bear that out and that should attract private investment $$ to build.

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Seattle's team isn't going anywhere. They just got a new stadium.

And, yes, I know it was a joke, but the Tampa Bay Devil Rays could be had. Pittsburgh Pirates might be available, in spite of their new stadium (in my opinion, the best). Oakland A's could be bought also, but I can see them going to Sacramento some day. The Kansas City Royals need help, also. So there are several possibilities, but the political, economic climate is just not right right now.

Is Nashville on the verge of moving up to the next tier of American Cities? Having both the NFL and MLB would make that statement. We are already near an economic and population level equality with Cincinnati and Kansas City (both have NFL and MLB). But adding Major league Baseball would have us knocking on the doors of the Denvers, Minneapolises and San Diegos for membership in the second tier of America's Cities.

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Actually Seatle is on the market, but not the Mariners... the Sonics (NBA). ESPN announced today that a top guy with the Sonics has said their time in Seattle is up. The deal breaker there was .... you guessed it...... a new stadium. They want a new state-of-the-art facility and the city won't build it for them. They are activily searching possibilities, but before people start dreaming hang on, NBA won't allow a team in Nashivlle with the Grizzlies down the road in Memphis and Oklahoma seems to be the front runner for the Sonics.

Devel Rays won't make thier way to Nashville, while I would love to dream that Nashville could get a real baseball team.......... I aint smoking crack. No chance. As Richard pointed out too many Professional teams in town. Mid Level markets can't support every sport. Look at the empty seats the Preds were seeing earlier in the year. Baseball would be along those lines. Maybe one day Nashivlle might see a team.

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There's one problem ... NHL. I don't think you could fit a third major league sports team in here. Frankly, I'd love to see an American League team here. The nearest ones are Tampa or Texas (my team) -- I haven't checked mileage on the map. Tampa is cheaper to fly to because of the Wright amendment prevents a direct flight on Southwest to Love Field. But a downtown baseball stadium would be bad ass on the scrapyard site across the river with shops and condos and all sorts of stuff over there. A big city urban feel could be made down there. Shoot, if they did that, I might even consider moving there. They'd have to have WiFi so I could work from the outfield bleachers on midweek afternoon games.

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The Rangers??????? No way man :shades: The Astros!! Being as I am origianlly from TX and grew up an Astros fan I have a slight bias toward my beloved team and a dislike for the Braves, the Cards, and the Cubs, although I feel pretty sorry for Cubs fans.... stupid goat....

Regardsless of my love for the Astros I would ebrace any MLB team that made it's home in Nashville and I agree the scrap yard would be a great site for a ballpark. Heck the scrap yard would be a great site for anything other than a scrap yard. Like I said earlier, I can dream....

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Actually Seatle is on the market, but not the Mariners... the Sonics (NBA). ESPN announced today that a top guy with the Sonics has said their time in Seattle is up. The deal breaker there was .... you guessed it...... a new stadium. They want a new state-of-the-art facility and the city won't build it for them. They are activily searching possibilities, but before people start dreaming hang on, NBA won't allow a team in Nashivlle with the Grizzlies down the road in Memphis and Oklahoma seems to be the front runner for the Sonics.

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Joke or No Joke: With the cost of a Major League Baseball team a city really needs a population of 2-2.5 million to be able to support one. That is the reason that a number of cities that have had Pro teams for years can no longer support them and they are having trouble. Kansas City and Pittsburgh are really too small in todays world to be able to afford Major League Baseball. That being said, Nashville does not have the population at the present time to be able to fully support a Major League Baseball team. With the fact that Nashville already has the NFL and NHL, and the fact that there are a limited number of sports fans; if Nashville were to get one it would have a negative effect on your present sports teams. Most likely the Preds. NFL has fewer games and can draw from a larger area due to the fact that most games are on weekends. Because of that, you only need a population of ~1 million to be able to support a Pro Football team. The NHL, NBA, and Major League Baseball have many more games and they are not tied to weekend when people can more easily take off for them and therefore the area that they drew fans from is smaller meaning that you need a larger core population. Because of the cost of the roles for baseball the prices are affected limiting the numbers of fans that can fully support the team increasing the numbers needed in a metro area to support them. Nashville is a 3A market for Pro Baseball. If the Sounds leave, Nashville will be high on someones list to replace them with another 3A team. The sticking point will still have to be that a new stadium with have to be built in order to get one.

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Was just listening to someone from the Milwaukee Brewers (the Sounds are their triple A affiliate) on 1045 the Zone saying that he hasn't completely given up hope on a new stadium being built at the Riverfront site. Honestly, that just depresses me because I held out hope and held out hope and now that just sounds ridiculous. But it would be nice if somehow they could regoup and pull together the stadium plan.

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It should also be noted that the new owners of the Seattle SuperSonics are based in Oklahoma City, so if they can't strike a deal to keep the team in Seattle, then don't be surprised if they decide to pack it up and move it down there, especially with there being a fan base now willing to support a team thanks to the Hornets (who move back to New Orleans next season).

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Alright! Plan B then.

A soccer stadium.

If Nashville could support Major League Soccer (it works in Columbus, Kansas City and Salt Lake City) we could fill 20,000 seats 18 times a year. Dallas has a good example of what might be an affordable stadium.

There is minor league soccer to consider, also. Charleston has what some consider to be the best minor league venue (at about 5,000 seats):

photo_stadium_overview3.jpg

photo_stadium_overview5.jpg

A soccer stadium could be built more cheaply, I would assume. The stadium could also be used for concerts, college soccer, political rallies, etc. You could even allow it to be used as a park where downtown intramural leagues play a lunchtime or early afternoon game.

I could just as easily sit in the sun and take in a soccer game if no baseball was available.

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