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detwaa84

Urban Planning

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Currently my major is Architecture at UDM, but I want to change it to urban planning. Does anyone have any info or is an urban planner or student of this program at Wayne State or other colleges. I would like some advice and input on it before starting this fall. I would appreciate it.

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Well, I just graduated with a degree in architecture and I'm going to grad school at U of M in urban planning, but I know nothing about the program. Way for me to be prepared!

nofunk is going into the same program as well next year, but I have a feeling he hasn't read much more than I have.

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Architects with a degree in civil engineering....theyz ballers. Seriously, one of my friends who did that is going to be buying a $400,000 condo on Chicago's gold coast. He just graduated with me and is only 22!

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so he's both an architect and a civil engineer, and only 22?

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Engineer! Architect! I could have been either, but my nightmare (calculas) came in the way. I failed the classs twice in OCC and once at UDM. I had to change my major. That's why I choose urban planning. I just hope that I don't deal with math there.

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If you get into the more technical areas of planning -- civil engineering, transportation planning, urban design -- you will certainly deal with math, probably including calculus. But if you concentrate on things like community development, land use, housing, etc., then you'll probably be OK.

nofunk - so I do have an option? I mean I thought an urban planning program is just one, whatever is required is required. I understand what you mean, but looking at college catologs I don't see an option between the technical aspect and the general aspect. For example, Eastern's is a 36 credit major and 20 credit minor in GIS or Historic Preservation. Statistics is the required math class though.

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If we're talking undergrad, then no, you might not have a choice of concentration. In that case you really need to read through the departmental requirements. They should spell out what math courses, if any, are required for the degree.

At the graduate level, however, you do have a choice on what you want to concentrate in. And that's where you could choose a less "technical" line of study in planning.

But you really shouldn't shy away from math. It's good for you! :thumbsup:

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nofunk, I don't think you know this baller despite the fact that you've met quite a few architecture students at U of M.

detwaa, are you going to finish off architecture?

Because another avenue I am considering is working for a firm that does architecture and urban planning. About a month ago, there was a career fair for architecture students, there was a firm there from Chicago that wanted students with academic experience in both architecture and planning. Unfortunately, (or fortunately for me) there were no students that matched their interests because none had planning experience.

With this job, the type of stuff they did was urban design though, which IMO gives you the most creativity in the field. Not to mention, number crunching isn't part of your job. I'm hoping to hit them up next year for a summer internship, and who knows.. maybe a job.

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No, I don't plan to finish it. In the fall, I will start my program of urban planning, either at EMU or WSU. I really do like architecture and would have really liked to pursue a career in it, but it would just take to much time to do both. Plus, maybe I'll do a masters in architecture...who knows.

Speaking of Master's, I'm happy that you're going into it, but I'm just wondering why so fast. I thought to get accepted into a masters program you need recomendations and jobs experience. You just graduated, right? That gives me high hopes though, to continue immedietly and get the master's.

Do urban planners always work in the same firms as architects, or are there "urban planning" firms? good luck with your venture, I wish you the best with your job search.

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I have a MUP from UofM.

detwa84 and wolverine, email me and I'll see how I can help.

email is the same as my handle, except at umich.edu

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Any general info you have for those of us at Michigan looking at an MUP down the road would be great too. :good:

Thanks.

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Thanks js, I'll email you as soon as the craziness from graduation settles down.

Detwaa, you can enter an graduate program immediately upon completion of your undergraduate requirements.

Although doing a couple years in a real world job can be very beneficial. You'll hear an argument from both sides. On one end, it's good to get grad school done and over with. Sometimes it's actually easier to get in, because in terms of reccomendations, you are still fresh in the minds of your faculty. My grades did a slight dip this final semester (although they weren't bad), but if I would have applied later, I wouldn't have gotten the scholarships I received because I got a few nasty low B's. On the other end, you develop skills in the office that allow you to think problems through rationally. Your knowledge can be easily applied in the classroom, and colleges like this.

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Thanks, Wolv.

I was in Ann Arbor and Ypsi today. Great city (AA), Great downtown, and expensive stores at Briarwood.

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If you get into the more technical areas of planning -- civil engineering, transportation planning, urban design -- you will certainly deal with math, probably including calculus.

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I've been a civil engineer for 35 years - highest math I've used on the job was trig. Otherwise, add, subtract, mulitply and divide :thumbsup:. I design & build roads & bridges.

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I recieved my MUP from UofM in 2002. So far, I have worked in current planning (development review) for two suburban Chicago municipalities. The highest math I have needed so far is simple trig, and only once or twice.

And from my experience, even the engineers and architects I have worked with only didn't need much more than trig because most everything for them is already in a handbook or industrial manual and they just make sure their work is consistent with it.

As for the education I got at TCAUP, I would caution that it was not very practical and most academic. But there were certainly practical elements available and opportunities for getting internships (which is where one gets the real practical experience).

Though, the cache of UofM certainly helps when being compared against other candidates for jobs.

Piece of advise:

Fight for the best internship possible. And try to make it a paying one with real experience, not just making copies and getting coffee.

Yeah, the Planning Department I work for usually gets 2 planning interns each summer. We definiately make sure interns get practical experience.

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The highest math I took in college was differential equations. "D" was for diploma :yahoo:. My advisor recommended I take it over, it won't look good on your transcript. I said no, I passed with a D, there's no assurance I'll pass the 2nd time or 3rd time :blink: . First employer looked at the transcript (I think), nobody's asked since.

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Calculus is still a horrible scar on my transcript. The only C I ever got at U of M. Good thing when I left the school of LS&"PlAy" and switched into Architecture it didn't get factored into my GPA.

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Calculus is still a horrible scar on my transcript. The only C I ever got at U of M. Good thing when I left the school of LS&"PlAy" and switched into Architecture it didn't get factored into my GPA.

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