CarolinaDaydreamin

Perception of Charlotte Nationwide

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You can really only see that one parking deck (and ascent obviously but that’s different) and it has the banner over it, it looks fine. The shots have been very flattering of the city, gloomy weather aside. 

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Overall I thought it was great exposure for Charlotte and the skyline and I saw more buildings everytime then panned the crowd.  

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I have some friends who go to Clemson (sadly lol) and just like most others who aren't from the area, I've heard nothing but praise about CLT from them. "It's so clean/new/pretty."

And this shot is more like what I saw most of during gameday.

5a24b7bb54144_cltgamedayhelms.thumb.jpg.decb2c7365421b43e495b2348ed411aa.jpg

Source

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On 11/20/2017 at 12:16 PM, Scribe said:

I find this fascinating that people still refuse to look at the facts in this case:

  • A black person is shot by police...
  • BLM blows up and destroys things in a "peaceful" protest
  • Same protests end up murdering another black man
  • Then the fact comes out that a black police officer shot an armed man that refused to obey police commands.
  • The chief of Police, that they are protesting against, just happens to be black too.

And this is a "race relations" issue.

That is one of the most ignorant statements I've heard come out in Charlotte politics, and we have our share that are worthy of the hall of fame.

It is sad to watch the city vote on emotion instead of reason!  But hey, Braxton Winston is going to fix it from within!

         As much as I hate the "I studied this in college" type of argument, this was really one part of my studies that had a real world example happen literally on my doorstep, and it gave us a unique opportunity to discuss it in an educational environment, with many different points of view, and I'm not just referring to many different liberal points of view. I had already studied many of the inequities in Charlotte prior to the Kieth Lamont Scott shooting, and frankly I was surprised that a powder keg like Charlotte hadn't exploded sooner, with low income equality, highly segregated schools and neighborhoods, abysmal upward mobility, lack of quality affordable housing, among other things. There are many real issues in Charlotte when it comes to race relations, and blame can be placed on both sides, BUT Charlotte has a long history of planning practices that favor white, upper-middle class families over those people of color, and the difference between the "crescent" and the "wedge" is stark to say the least. 

          In reference to what happened last September specifically, I think the BLM movement has a noble goal, but is poor in execution. To bring attention to something in this day and age of instant news via social media (remember Mr. Scott's wife recorded the incident live on Facebook, a relatively new technology at the time) an organization needs to seize the moment, or they risk losing their voice in the turbulent news cycle. Keep in mind that we were closing in on what is likely to go down as the most controversial election in our nation's history. When the news first broke it was filled with speculation and inaccuracies, as it often is in the first hours of a crisis, and rumors were running rampant. Some thought for sure it was a book, the police were remaining silent, and nobody really knew the truth. As usual, both extremes, the "thin blue line" folks, and the "f*** the police" folks drew their lines, and what started as a small vigil turned into a protest, and then to a riot. By the time the truth began to trickle out, the momentum was too great, and after those two ugly nights, the agitators were slowly pushed out by those with better intentions, and after about a week we were already beginning to think about the legacy and implications of this rather historical moment in our city's history.

          Looking at it from the view of an activist, to not seize the moment, on the change it WAS in fact a book and not a gun, if in fact the police DID act in a brutal manner, would have been a mistake. And that is ultimately the flaw with BLM, they wait until events occur, and try to capitalize on tragedy instead of bringing attention everyday issues, but isn't that really a product of our time? You have to make headlines to be heard, that's largely in part how a certain someone ended up in the White House. Sometimes BLM plays their cards right, there's a conviction, we see justice served, but sadly its ugly outside agitators that tarnish their name more than anything or anyone. 

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On 12/3/2017 at 11:05 PM, nakers2 said:

         As much as I hate the "I studied this in college" type of argument, this was really one part of my studies that had a real world example happen literally on my doorstep, and it gave us a unique opportunity to discuss it in an educational environment, with many different points of view, and I'm not just referring to many different liberal points of view. I had already studied many of the inequities in Charlotte prior to the Kieth Lamont Scott shooting, and frankly I was surprised that a powder keg like Charlotte hadn't exploded sooner, with low income equality, highly segregated schools and neighborhoods, abysmal upward mobility, lack of quality affordable housing, among other things. There are many real issues in Charlotte when it comes to race relations, and blame can be placed on both sides, BUT Charlotte has a long history of planning practices that favor white, upper-middle class families over those people of color, and the difference between the "crescent" and the "wedge" is stark to say the least. 

          In reference to what happened last September specifically, I think the BLM movement has a noble goal, but is poor in execution. To bring attention to something in this day and age of instant news via social media (remember Mr. Scott's wife recorded the incident live on Facebook, a relatively new technology at the time) an organization needs to seize the moment, or they risk losing their voice in the turbulent news cycle. Keep in mind that we were closing in on what is likely to go down as the most controversial election in our nation's history. When the news first broke it was filled with speculation and inaccuracies, as it often is in the first hours of a crisis, and rumors were running rampant. Some thought for sure it was a book, the police were remaining silent, and nobody really knew the truth. As usual, both extremes, the "thin blue line" folks, and the "f*** the police" folks drew their lines, and what started as a small vigil turned into a protest, and then to a riot. By the time the truth began to trickle out, the momentum was too great, and after those two ugly nights, the agitators were slowly pushed out by those with better intentions, and after about a week we were already beginning to think about the legacy and implications of this rather historical moment in our city's history.

          Looking at it from the view of an activist, to not seize the moment, on the change it WAS in fact a book and not a gun, if in fact the police DID act in a brutal manner, would have been a mistake. And that is ultimately the flaw with BLM, they wait until events occur, and try to capitalize on tragedy instead of bringing attention everyday issues, but isn't that really a product of our time? You have to make headlines to be heard, that's largely in part how a certain someone ended up in the White House. Sometimes BLM plays their cards right, there's a conviction, we see justice served, but sadly its ugly outside agitators that tarnish their name more than anything or anyone. 

9

The police were silent for a reason.  The lie about the book was started and spread by the family of Scott.  The wife knew exactly what type of man her husband was.  Her previous requests to the courts for protection from Scott is proof of this.  She knew damn well he did not have a book and did have a gun.  The only people who actually thought it was a book were those who were looking for a way to lash out at the police.  Period.  

Your take on BLM is comical.  BLM is a racist and anti-police group.   This previous comment has nothing to do with the issues they focus on or the claims they make and specifically speaks to how they are and how they operate.  

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Don't know enough about BLM to comment intelligently.  I'm definitely sympathetic to their cause though.  Clearly, black males are treated differently by police in America.  Though I understand why that might be, it's still wrong.  Innocent individuals should not be hassled (or worse) simply because of the color of their skin.  Also, it's absolutely clear that better training for police is needed and that some officers should not be on the force (see the jackass who killed the guy in AZ recently who should absolutely be spending a lot of time in jail).  I am convinced that there are some truly bad cops and that they are often poor at deescalating situations.  I went on ride-alongs with the Skyline division in San Diego and I was not impressed by what I observed.  All of that said, I think the overwhelming number of officers are great public servants who risk their lives daily to keep us safe.  It's a very difficult job, one I wouldn't be willing to do.

Regarding the Scott case, I agree that the shooting was defensible, that he wasn't a great guy and that the family's portrayal of the shooting was intentionally inaccurate.  I do not think that the officer should have been punished.  However, to my completely untrained eye, it did seem that the situation could have been deescalated and that there were other options.  I also recognize that the officers are at risk and it's easy to second guess from the safety of my keyboard.  

I do object to people (not anyone here necessarily) who always reflexively side with the police and assume that they always acted appropriately (particularly when the individual impacted is a person of color).  I see breathtaking incompetence every day in my business so I see no reason why police would be exempted from that.  Wherever people are involved, mistakes happen.

If I was a person of color, I'd be very upset about the rhetoric of the Republican Party and the President in particular. 

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45 minutes ago, JBS said:

Also, it's absolutely clear that better training for police is needed and that some officers should not be on the force (see the jackass who killed the guy in AZ recently who should absolutely be spending a lot of time in jail).  I am convinced that there are some truly bad cops and that they are often poor at deescalating situations.  I went on ride-alongs with the Skyline division in San Diego and I was not impressed by what I observed.  All of that said, I think the overwhelming number of officers are great public servants who risk their lives daily to keep us safe.  It's a very difficult job, one I wouldn't be willing to do.

1

There is a specific reason why the term 'better training' is used rather than better officers...  

 

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9 hours ago, cjd5050 said:

There is a specific reason why the term 'better training' is used rather than better officers...  

 

At the core of it, BLM was built on good intentions, but just like Antifa, they are not really an "organization" in fact they could be called an "un-organization" their name and cause is free licensed and I feel like that has bitten them in the ass to an extent. While the core of the BLM movement is not "anti police", but rather a "better training, anti-racist police" movement, there are splinter factions, and individuals who use the BLM name to push for anything from killing cops to outright anarchy, and that is what's scary. Unfortunately to let the movement fall entirely to bad hands would make any new, perhaps more organized movement, less credible. 

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10 hours ago, nakers2 said:

At the core of it, BLM was built on good intentions, but just like Antifa, they are not really an "organization" in fact they could be called an "un-organization" their name and cause is free licensed and I feel like that has bitten them in the ass to an extent. While the core of the BLM movement is not "anti police", but rather a "better training, anti-racist police" movement, there are splinter factions, and individuals who use the BLM name to push for anything from killing cops to outright anarchy, and that is what's scary. Unfortunately to let the movement fall entirely to bad hands would make any new, perhaps more organized movement, less credible. 

Doubling down on the myth.  Bold strategy Cotton.  

You're free to believe what you think, even if untrue.  Have a nice day.

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 Of these 44 people per day who move to Charlotte, is there an accounting of race in the increased population, separate from the natural increase from births?

 

 

On 12/10/2017 at 4:03 PM, kermit said:

I can't weigh in on the validity of the survey but this chart appeared in a Boston Globe article on racism in Boston:

 

BGlobe.jpg

http://apps.bostonglobe.com/spotlight/boston-racism-image-reality/series/image/

 

 

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1 hour ago, tarhoosier said:

 Of these 44 people per day who move to Charlotte, is there an accounting of race in the increased population, separate from the natural increase from births?

I don't believe so. AFAIK the migration data and race / ethnicity data are collected by seperate Census Brueau programs so we have no idea about the racial mix of people who migrate at the county level.

Those survey results didn't line up with my anecdotal understanding of migration to Charlotte but I only have one, of the many,  perspectives on the issue.

Edited by kermit

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51 minutes ago, kermit said:

I don't believe so. AFAIK the migration data and race / ethnicity data are collected by seperate Census Brueau programs so we have no idea about the racial mix of people who migrate at the county level.

Those survey results didn't line up with my anecdotal understanding of migration to Charlotte but I only have one, of the many,  perspectives on the issue.

I found this at the Census / American Community Survey site:

https://census.gov/data/tables/2015/demo/geographic-mobility/county-to-county-migration-2011-2015.html

I downloaded the County-to-county migration from 2011-15 broken down by race.  If I am looking at it correctly (and I very well might not be, as I am not super familiar with their reports), their estimates for migration into Mecklenburg County are:

57% White alone

28% Black or African-American alone

 9% Asian alone

6% Other race alone or two or more races

Ethnicity is addressed in a different report; Hispanic / Latino can report in any of the above race categories. 

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On Thrillist today is a story  "The Best Neighborhoods in America to Spend a Weekend."  Neighborhoods such as Ocean Beach, Prospect Park, Logan Square and Bywater are at the top of the story. Low and behold the last neighborhood mentioned is Plaza Midwood, including a photo of the Beaver.

Quote

The funky, beating heart of Charlotte is one of the hidden gems of the whole dang South

https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/coolest-neighborhoods-in-america

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and the Thrillist contribution dujor is ranking the obnoxiousness of NFL fans. Jacksonville has the least obnoxious fans, we are the next on the list:

Quote

Three NFC title games and a Super Bowl in just 20 years? Congrats, you’re the Marlins of the NFL! Except people actually show up to your games. Usually. Considering how insufferable you should be having tasted success without paying any dues, you're surprisingly not that bad. Probably because the number of teal seats you see on television is directly proportional to the number of wins the Panthers have that season, and what kind of mood Cam Newton is in.

https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/the-most-obnoxious-fans-in-the-nfl-patriots-raiders-seahawks-and-jets

[no dog in fight, I was merely amused]

Edited by kermit

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Ummm, that would be six division titles, for NFC Champion games, and two Super Bowl appearances. Must be this guy's first time writing about sports.

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Charlotte #4 on list of cities with the largest percentage of large homes over 3000 sq ft. https://www.realtor.com/news/trends/metros-with-most-mcmansions/?identityID=5a274168c56563e38b20bacf&MID=2018_0216_WeeklyNL_pt2&RID=4580664982&cid=eml-2018-0216-WeeklyNL-blog_1_mostmcmansions-blogs_trends   Where is Houston on this list?  Now Provo UT I believe that for in my travels to Utah I have never seen so many 5-7 bedroom homes in my life! 

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On 2/16/2018 at 10:35 PM, KJHburg said:

Charlotte #4 on list of cities with the largest percentage of large homes over 3000 sq ft. https://www.realtor.com/news/trends/metros-with-most-mcmansions/?identityID=5a274168c56563e38b20bacf&MID=2018_0216_WeeklyNL_pt2&RID=4580664982&cid=eml-2018-0216-WeeklyNL-blog_1_mostmcmansions-blogs_trends   Where is Houston on this list?  Now Provo UT I believe that for in my travels to Utah I have never seen so many 5-7 bedroom homes in my life! 

Those Mormons have big families you know.

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Billy Graham passed away, RIP.

The media circus is now descending upon the Billy Graham Library. Local news is already set up out front. National news networks are utilizing the local affiliates for on the ground reporting currently. 

Billy Graham Library's website getting so many hits their page won't load. 

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