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Perception of Charlotte Nationwide


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I happened to be reading an article about a couple of my favorite artists attending some of the protests and they incorrectly said that one attended a protest in Charlottesville, NC. I hated that they didn’t do a little more research although the website is allaboutlaughs.com, so not the most reliable news source I suppose. Either way it was a little disheartening.
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14 hours ago, cltheel.sdl said:

So in CMS, each school receives funding independent of the property tax base within their specific school zone?  

The purpose of school districts is to pool revenue and (presumably) redistribute it equitably. Better quality public schools in wealthy areas are generally attributed to stronger parental involvement, PTA fundraising ability and political power at the margins of the budget only.  (I find myself skeptical this is really the case  but I have never looked at school budgets closely)

The metrics that are selected to determine equity in CMS budgets are partly why N Meck periodically says they are going to split from CMS and create their own district. Many suburban parents would say that CMS does not even try to keep pace with growth.

Edited by kermit
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North Carolina is unusual in having statewide funding for education. In 1930-31 the Depression devastated a rural, agricultural based state. All the local boards exhausted their money and had to reduce or disband their remit. There was simply no money to be had as property values for land collapsed, cash was rarely available and one cannot take blood from a stone. (There was no money even for the white schools is what is meant here)

In 1931 and adjusted in 1933 the state took funding for schools with each county responsible for buildings but not salaries, books and other expenses. Nearly all smaller units were folded into county-wide administration, according to the new law.  Such control, once ceded, is never regained. This protected NC schools from (most of) the property tax inequality issues all other districts in the country addressed later in the 20th century and even today. 

This information is widely available and can be found online in many places. 

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2 hours ago, tarhoosier said:

North Carolina is unusual in having statewide funding for education. In 1930-31 the Depression devastated a rural, agricultural based state. All the local boards exhausted their money and had to reduce or disband their remit. There was simply no money to be had as property values for land collapsed, cash was rarely available and one cannot take blood from a stone. (There was no money even for the white schools is what is meant here)

In 1931 and adjusted in 1933 the state took funding for schools with each county responsible for buildings but not salaries, books and other expenses. Nearly all smaller units were folded into county-wide administration, according to the new law.  Such control, once ceded, is never regained. This protected NC schools from (most of) the property tax inequality issues all other districts in the country addressed later in the 20th century and even today. 

This information is widely available and can be found online in many places. 

Thanks for sharing this information Tarhoosier.  I do believe around this time frame, the state also took over most road funding as well.  That is why roads are not maintained or funded at the county/local level minus those streets that are in municipal limits and not designated at state, US, or Interstate routes.

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The history of persistent penury in NC required courageous decisions by state elected representatives and the governor in the early 1930's.

"By the Highway Act of 1921, the state government in Raleigh officially became responsible for the maintenance of North Carolina's highways to "relieve the counties and cities and towns of the state of this burden." In 1931, under the pressure of widespread economic failure of county governments during the Great Depression, the state added to its purview the maintenance of practically all roads in North Carolina."

per NCpedia.org

There is no such thing as a county road in North Carolina, much different from many other states. 

Edited by tarhoosier
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3 hours ago, tarhoosier said:

The history of persistent penury in NC required courageous decisions by state elected representatives and the governor in the early 1930's.

"By the Highway Act of 1921, the state government in Raleigh officially became responsible for the maintenance of North Carolina's highways to "relieve the counties and cities and towns of the state of this burden." In 1931, under the pressure of widespread economic failure of county governments during the Great Depression, the state added to its purview the maintenance of practically all roads in North Carolina."

per NCpedia.org

There is no such thing as a county road in North Carolina, much different from many other states. 

In fact NC maintains the 2nd most roads of any state only trailing the huge Texas.  Florida for example has state and county roads.  

Edited by KJHburg
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While the state doesn't maintain municipal roads (roads within city limits) other than state highways for larger municipalities with their own DOT's,  the state does reimburse every city/town for virtually all maintenance costs.

This part makes blaming the city for potholes difficult, because I believe their are limits to this reimbursement (maybe max per mile lane per year) which makes it tougher for congested cities like Charlotte to keep up with wear, compared to state averages that set those rates.

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15 minutes ago, Hushpuppy321 said:

Question: Is Charlotte Beige & Boring?  

I hear people say this but don’t totally understand what that means.  Posting here because I saw that comment about Charlotte on another UP site.  I been here for a few years and haven’t found it boring or beige.

Here's a good article from wow... 5 years ago already from two of our own.  I think some of our UPers were vocal about it and the idea stuck.

I will say since then I feel like there's been a stronger emphasis of murals and public art which at least in my mind started to outweigh the big boring apartments

https://www.charlotteagenda.com/22381/big-beige-rectangles-whats-wrong-with-design-in-charlotte-and-why-it-needs-to-change/

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35 minutes ago, SouthEndCLT811 said:

Here's a good article from wow... 5 years ago already from two of our own.  I think some of our UPers were vocal about it and the idea stuck.

I will say since then I feel like there's been a stronger emphasis of murals and public art which at least in my mind started to outweigh the big boring apartments

https://www.charlotteagenda.com/22381/big-beige-rectangles-whats-wrong-with-design-in-charlotte-and-why-it-needs-to-change/

That’s a great article - Thanks!

When I came to Charlotte I was blown away by how clean and new everything looks.  I do understand keeping historical buildings and adaptive reuse is important but for us northern refugees (from NYC metro), we like alittle new and clean Alternative to where we grew up.  In the last couple years Charlotte is improving with Murals, Ground floor retail and adaptive reuse from what I’ve seen.

Anyway, I just hate to see other forums dump on Charlotte...

Edited by Hushpuppy321
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I wanted to post this somewhere, but didn't know where.  I didn't want to start a new topic.  This could somehow fit here I think.  Anyhow, move this to a better place if there is one.

Does Charlotte contain a building or other structure that when the skyline is thrown up behind a news reporter or commercial, it is recognized immediately that it is Charlotte.  What I'm thinking about is something like the Space Needle, the Arch, the Hollywood sign, the Golden Gate, the Sydney Opera House, the Eiffel Tower.  I think you may get what I'm saying.  It would have to be unique.  I have been to the places I mentioned and more, as I'm sure many of you have.  Some cities I have been to and not been to, do not have an easily recognizable skyline.  I'm thinking Houston, Indianapolis, Denver, Kansas City, Tampa, etc.  Some cities have something that I recognize for the wrong reason. One off the top of my head is Jacksonville. It has that building that flares out at the bottom.  I'm not hating on Jax, I lived there for a while. But I think this is a butt ugly building.  Anyhow, just wondering what you all think. I think we do not.  I'd like to see something built here that can be claimed as a structure that says "Hey that's Charlotte".

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Charlotte's skyline has changed so much even in the last 10 years but I would say Bank of America Corp. Center is our iconic building.  Now how many people from around the country would recognize it probably not many.    

As for JAX their iconic building is the Independent Life, Modis now  Wells Fargo tower that flares out.  Plus it is on the St Johns River which makes a great foreground for the skyline.  Without a river or some feature like the Arch in St Louis it gets down to just buildings.  But I bet if I flashed a photo of downtown LA to people many would not know where it is unless the iconic Hollywood sign was in the background.   However the Duke Energy Center is pretty iconic too so maybe both those buildings define our skyline. 

Edited by KJHburg
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If we’re talking regionally, perhaps I could agree with BOACC. However, if we’re talking across the country, I’d argue that DEC is considered our most iconic tower due to its uniqueness and light shows. Key bank tower in clevland looks very similar to BOA as well. I can’t think of one tower in the country that looks like DEC. Only twin is in China (Shanghai World financial center). So, although I love BOACC as much as the next person, I give the nod to DEC for our most iconic tower. 
 

if we’re talking globally and including structures...I’d argue that the Panthers stadium is the most recognizable and distinguishable structure that shouts out Charlotte to viewers across the world (based off logo/team name recognition). A lot of people aren’t skyline or skyscraper geeks like us, however, sports is a very powerful marketing and branding tool. People across the world know the Panthers logo. The Panthers logo on the giant scoreboard makes the stadium synonymous with Charlotte imo. 
 

So after all of that lol, my winner for the most iconic tower/structure (in terms of overall, global recognition, Bank Of America stadium. The London game showed me so many internationally fans from all over the globe. Many of which have visited Charlotte for business or games as well. And once MLS starts, that will add an even more diverse, international fan base to BOA stadium. 

Edited by CharlotteWkndBuzz
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Kermit, that's hilarious.  There is a youtube video about the top ten buildings that resisted selling out and that is in it. Can't find it now, of course. KJHburg, I agree, w/o the Hollywood sign, I don't think Los Angeles would  be identified.  A building like Sydney's Opera House is iconic and used for it's intended purpose. So, I know it could be a landmark structure or an actual building.  I think the Bechtler Modern Art building is one of the buildings that I love. It's unique as far as I know.  The problem is you can not see it in a skyline photo.  Oh well, just day dreaming.

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53 minutes ago, DH17 said:

Was on a run the other day on Stonewall St. Uptown and a foreign couple (heavy accent) asked me where "the bars and restaurants are on the waterfront".  I directed them towards Upper South End after explaining we don't have a waterfront here.

Wonder if they mixed us up with Charleston???

Or maybe they read about @Tyree Ricardo talk of a river or canal in lieu of I-277.  

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4 hours ago, DH17 said:

Was on a run the other day on Stonewall St. Uptown and a foreign couple (heavy accent) asked me where "the bars and restaurants are on the waterfront".  I directed them towards Upper South End after explaining we don't have a waterfront here.

Wonder if they mixed us up with Charleston???

You should have sent them to the Metropolitan....it does set adjacent to the Sugar Creek!

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  • 4 weeks later...

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