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krazeeboi

Additional urban centers in SC cities

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Interestingly enough, Greenville seems to be the only city in SC with the possibility, that I know of, of developing another urban center for entertainment in the near future.

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I would throw Columbia in there as well, once everything gets sorted out with Richland Mall/Midtown at Forest Acres. The infrastructure and clientele are all right there; it just needs a developer that knows what he/she is doing, and I have no doubt that area will take off.

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I think we can find parallels for most developments in Greenville and Columbia, but I don't think the Point will be challenged by any other.

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Who needs Richland Mall or whatever they call it now? Columbia is well on the way to having a massive contiguous urban area that is all considered downtown according to the local newscasts, countless publications and local residents' psyches. Downtown Columbia is not a corridor.

Just a while ago I drove around before coming into the library and, even though it's only Tuesday, there were groups of people everywhere. Young people were sitting on the benches near The Whig with more young people coming in and out of it, just hanging out being urban. So much for the Capital City going to sleep when USC is out.

People were all over the State House grounds and in the Vista on and around Gervais. The side street restaurants were packed on their patios.

I just look around in amazement as this city is being discovered exponentially right before my eyes.

And that doesn't include Five Points, where last Thursday at 10:30 p.m. crowds of 20-somethings were all over the place.

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Who needs Richland Mall or whatever they call it now? Columbia is well on the way to having a massive contiguous urban area that is all considered downtown according to the local newscasts, countless publications and local residents' psyches. Downtown Columbia is not a corridor.

Just a while ago I drove around before coming into the library and, even though it's only Tuesday, there were groups of people everywhere. Young people were sitting on the benches near The Whig with more young people coming in and out of it, just hanging out being urban. So much for the Capital City going to sleep when USC is out.

People were all over the State House grounds and in the Vista on and around Gervais. The side street restaurants were packed on their patios.

I just look around in amazement as this city is being discovered exponentially right before my eyes.

And that doesn't include Five Points, where last Thursday at 10:30 p.m. crowds of 20-somethings were all over the place.

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That is precisely what has been happening in Downtown Greenville for the past couple of years, only the places you mentioned could simply be exchanged for similar places here. This is the chaging face of our state's larger cities. :shades:

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I think we can find parallels for most developments in Greenville and Columbia, but I don't think the Point will be challenged by any other.

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Greenville's McChesney development at the Point details:

Atlanta-based McChesney Investment Advisors

-60 acres

-500,000 square feet of retail

-600,000 square feet of office space

-more than 2,000 residential units

-420-room hotel

"Taller commercial buildings -- the hotel among them -- would likely be along I-85. From there, the scale of the development would decrease as it moves away from the interstate. The residential component would be on the outer edges of the development, with retail properties between the residential and commercial space. This would be nice retail."

""The whole goal of this design is to get people out of their cars," McChesney's Shay Eskew told the Planning Commission."

To put this into perspective, this is about the same amount, but less, residential space as Verdae, but on 60 acres instead of 1,100 acres. For reference this is adjacent to the Point, Verdae Development, and the Carolina First Corporate campus, and in the environs of CU-ICAR, Verdae, Carolina First Campus, Magnolia Park, The Shops at Greenridge, and The Point.

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Whats happening in columbia and whats happening in greenville in relationship to a "coolness" factor downtown and how vibrant the downtowns are both very similar in terms of vibrancy. I wouldn't at all say one is more vibrant than the other, because if greenville people visited columbia they would be really surprised and if columbia people visited greenville they would also be surprised. What is interesting is the different projects underway in both these cities. Innovista has the potential to be something *REALLY* amazing (provided the tenants come), and greenville has a couple projects underway that will continue to add to an already vibrant downtown. Its interesting noting the difference between the two tho, columbia's downtown has a more "punk rock" feel, but this is primarily because of usc, greenvilles downtown has a more "wow, this is really nice" feel. Neither is better than the other, just different vibes for a different city.

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Greenville's McChesney development at the Point details:

Atlanta-based McChesney Investment Advisors

-60 acres

-500,000 square feet of retail

-600,000 square feet of office space

-more than 2,000 residential units

-420-room hotel

"Taller commercial buildings -- the hotel among them -- would likely be along I-85. From there, the scale of the development would decrease as it moves away from the interstate. The residential component would be on the outer edges of the development, with retail properties between the residential and commercial space. This would be nice retail."

""The whole goal of this design is to get people out of their cars," McChesney's Shay Eskew told the Planning Commission."

To put this into perspective, this is about the same amount, but less, residential space as Verdae, but on 60 acres instead of 1,100 acres. For reference this is adjacent to the Point, Verdae Development, and the Carolina First Corporate campus, and in the environs of CU-ICAR, Verdae, Carolina First Campus, Magnolia Park, The Shops at Greenridge, and The Point.

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Greenville's downtown is the hotspot for entertainment, whether you chose to make the most of it or not is up to you. The experience of downtown Greenville is growing everyday and has only become the destination that it is today in recent years. To make an assertion based on an experience of years ago would be uninformed. But as all cities grow, they will development more identity and entertainment options and most likely increase their "coolness" factor.

Interestingly enough, Greenville seems to be the only city in SC with the possibility, that I know of, of developing another urban center for entertainment in the near future. The McChesney development at the Point should do just that with its mix of office space, residential, retail, and entertainment options, not to mention its likely link to downtown via Rapid Bus transit.

One thing that can hurt Greenville is the lack of a large 4 year university, though steps are being made to make that happen. Still, the city seems to do well without one. I can't imagine life with one, if it's this good without.

To each their own. :thumbsup:

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The land where Killian Crossing is going is humongous. Also, Innovista will be huge and urban; it is becoming so now, building by building, although it will be a part of a more huge downtown Columbia.

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Here we go Innovista!

Innovista1

Innovista2

Innovista3

It's a little more than just another downtown development. It's pretty much set up to be another urban destination. :)

I'd consider Canalside, or the Bull St. projects as regular DT developments.

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"The Sandlapper", I don't see the correlation.

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Continue discussion about additional urban centers here.

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Here we go Innovista!

Innovista1

Innovista2

Innovista3

It's a little more than just another downtown development. It's pretty much set up to be another urban destination. :)

I'd consider Canalside, or the Bull St. projects as regular DT developments.

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^I agree. As of now, we're too short on specifics to say whether or not a distinct urban node of activity will form within Innovista since development will be spread out over the next 20 years. It's possible, but for right now, the most we can say is that it will fill in a lot of vacant land downtown.

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But contiguity is what I want, not just urban nodes plopped into the middle of suburbia.

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But contiguity is what I want, not just urban nodes plopped into the middle of suburbia.

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I agree; that is indeed preferential. But if you want to redeem suburbia, you've gotta start somewhere. I think the best way to do it is with transit, but I don't think there's any "one size fits all" solution.

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Yes, it can truly be a chicken-and-egg situation. I especially agree with your last sentence.

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Who's going to walk to their McMansion at the end of the cul-de-sac in a neighborhood with one entrance?

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But contiguity is what I want, not just urban nodes plopped into the middle of suburbia.

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This is something I've never understood. I like gridded streets, but that seemed to disappear from suburbs in the late 70s, early 80s in favor of one entrance, cul-de-sacs, and winding roads. Is that cheaper to develop?

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