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ironchapman

Could Atlanta Learn From Vancouver?

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That's what a delegation of Atlantans are asking as they visit this Canadian city in an attempt to figure out how to make our city more livable.

In Vancouver, civic leaders see a livable city

Metro leaders were exposed to a vastly different approach to growth and development during the 11th annual LINK trip, organized by the Atlanta Regional Commission, short for "Leadership, Innovation, Networking, Knowledge."

Vancouver's strategy of density and transit is a stark contrast to the Atlanta region's road-oriented sprawl.

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I think you are correct IC. We can learn lessons from Vancouver, but there is a LINK to really any other city that we may look at and bring the lessons learned back to the ATL.

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Atlanta could learn - the city needs to build some fjords, move to Canada & import more Asians for starters ;)

Realistically though, even though Atlanta could learn from most any city, Vancouver is such a dramatically different city, I'm not sure what can be implemented in Atlanta that is successful in Vancouver.

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Atlanta could learn - the city needs to build some fjords, move to Canada & import more Asians for starters ;)

Realistically though, even though Atlanta could learn from most any city, Vancouver is such a dramatically different city, I'm not sure what can be implemented in Atlanta that is successful in Vancouver.

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Atlanta could learn - the city needs to build some fjords, move to Canada & import more Asians for starters ;)

Realistically though, even though Atlanta could learn from most any city, Vancouver is such a dramatically different city, I'm not sure what can be implemented in Atlanta that is successful in Vancouver.

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What are some of Vancouver's assets that we don't have?

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What are some of Vancouver's assets that we don't have?

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I think some of the more knowledgeable on the subject of urbanity might be able to tell you more, but here's what I can remember...

First of all, it is the only major North American city to not have an interstate running through downtown (I believe the article actually mentions that).

They have one of the densest urban cores in the country. They have also been able to keep sprawl under far better control than we have.

A skyline that isn't spread out all over the place (note, though, that I think that Atlanta's skyline does have some charm in the way it is spread out).

They have a easily usable and extensive mass transit system.

Someone else will have to tell you more or maybe elaborate on these points. That's pretty much the basics of what Vancouver has that we don't.

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Certain things that Atlanta couldn't possibly match - the geography. That is the most striking thing about Vancouver, especially as you drive through Stanley Park & cross the inlet to north Vancouver. Also, downtown is also separated from the south by a smaller waterway, so essentially it's a downtown that is compact due to the environment. Downtown Vancouver, is as active & urban as you would find in NYC or possibly an Asian city (with the large Asian population it makes you wonder if you are in Canada). But, outside of downtown, the majority of the city is comprised of a mix of single family & lowrise apartment buildings. Just a few minutes outside of downtown you come across a beautiful bungalow neighborhood near the university.

Regarding the mass transit, it was ok - it wasn't that extensive but was heavily used. As for getting into the city, of course you do have a freeway leading from Washington state into the outskirts of Vancouver, but it then turns into a large boulevard. It took a while to get into downtown, so I would imagine most commuters would prefer to live closer to the city center for that reason. But also, there were ferry services too which are also used for commuting - especially for the residents north of Vancouver.

But again, it's hard to define the assets - it's simply a far remarkable city than Atlanta or most US cities.

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Yes....we could learn something from Vancouver. Density is not a bad word. Even I fall pray to the idea of high density as startling. While I think the increasing density of intown Atlanta is great, every time I think of moving, it's to a home on acreage. I really do hope that the delegation could take back with them a sense that regional cooperation is keep and that density, when done correctly, is good for transit.

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