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ZachariahDaMan

Lodi Township historic preservation

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I'm well aware of the rule about not posting entire articles but this one is so small that I am anyways.

Two township residents have formed a new Lodi historical preservation group that will be an offshoot of the Saline Area Historical Society. The group was established to preserve the unique history of Lodi Township and has undertaken two projects.

The first is the preservation and renovation of the old Lodi Township Hall on Pleasant Lake Road. Built in 1867, the former township hall has been closed for 30 years.

The second project involves the Lodi Township Cemetery, established in the 1820s and located on the corner of Textile and Ann Arbor-Saline roads. Group members are looking for old photos or personal stories that relate to the history of the township.

One of these days when I'm bored I will go get photos of these places. I can't recall ever being in Lodi Township.

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I've seen the old township hall, it's pretty nice and worth getting some pictures of. For the most part, Lodi is a hilly and rural township, but has quite a few mega sized church's throughout the countryside, which I think are interesting. Industry has begun to move in, so some of the roads are getting a lot of development and seeing increased traffic. I'm guessing Lodi is soon to become another Pittsfield. Better start widening those streets!

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I don't know your side of the state that well. How far is this township from Ann Arbor proper? Also I'm not sure I enderstand the point of historic preservation for a cemetary. I've never seen a cemetary redeveloped into a strip mall or anything.

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I know around Saginaw Co., there are several cemeteries that are designated as historic places. One had a log cabin church moved to its site. Cemeteries can tell a story about the earliest settlers or inhabitants of a local area. When one of these places becomes managed by some preservation group, it guarantess ongoing maintenance, which many old cemetires do not receive. I mean, what happened to our cemeteries from 150 years ago? Some have been destroyed, while some of the remaining ones are in dire need of maintenance.

The location of this cemetery is actually pretty distant from Ann Arbor's urban boundaries. There's a greenbeblt that is designed to suffocate growth, but it seems like development is just jumping over that to the otherside regardless. I don't where the cemetery falls in respect to that, but development is creeping out that way. I really wouldn't be suprised at all to see it replaced by a strip mall 10-15 years from now.

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I know around Saginaw Co., there are several cemeteries that are designated as historic places. One had a log cabin church moved to its site. Cemeteries can tell a story about the earliest settlers or inhabitants of a local area. When one of these places becomes managed by some preservation group, it guarantess ongoing maintenance, which many old cemetires do not receive. I mean, what happened to our cemeteries from 150 years ago? Some have been destroyed, while some of the remaining ones are in dire need of maintenance.

The location of this cemetery is actually pretty distant from Ann Arbor's urban boundaries. There's a greenbeblt that is designed to suffocate growth, but it seems like development is just jumping over that to the otherside regardless. I don't where the cemetery falls in respect to that, but development is creeping out that way. I really wouldn't be suprised at all to see it replaced by a strip mall 10-15 years from now.

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Yeah, I guess most historically preserved sites cater to visitors. Cemeteries don't seem like that kind of place unless you are visiting the dead I guess :)

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There are cemetery tours all around this country including Michigan. Just as some may find it strange that there is a whole community or urban enthusiast out there, there are cemetery enthusiast.

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There are cemetery tours all around this country including Michigan. Just as some may find it strange that there is a whole community or urban enthusiast out there, there are cemetery enthusiast.

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There sure are cemetery tours. I've gone to one in my town and may be going to one in Plymouth sometime. I've also heard of them in Northville and South Lyon. Interesting stuff.

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Oh, I'm aware there are cemetery tours, but I don't consider ones way out in the middle of nowhere a fair attraction unless there are some lavish grave sites of some notable people. Really, what makes cemteries so attractive in cities is that they are like parks. Sometimes I would ride my bike around the cemtery on Geddes because it had nice paved paths and hills, and beautiful scenery. I know not all cemteries like people cruising through them though.

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My post was directed to Eridony, not you Ian because he said "Hmm, I never knew there were cemetery tours"

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I was kind or wondering who he was responding too, as well. I thought it was me. lol Either way, there is definitely cemetery enthusiast, out there, that are just as enthusiastic about cemeteries, new and old, as we are about urban landscapes and architecture, new and old. If a preservation group wants to tend to an historic cemetery (1820) I say more power to them. Community involvement in preservation should never be frowned upon or made light of, regardless of whether it's in the middle of the city or in the middle of nowhere.

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