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Earthcraft House

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Another green, environmentally friendly home around downtown, to add to the growing list of green projects. This one is on Stone Avenue. Anyone have info on this project?

DSC02767.jpg

DSC02768.jpg

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This gorgeous and well-designed home is being built by an architect couple who are very forward-thinking and hoping to promote "green design" in Greenville. The wife is helping us on a "green remodel" of our house in the same neighborhood.

Let's hope this is one of many "green" projects for homeowners!

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This gorgeous and well-designed home is being built by an architect couple who are very forward-thinking and hoping to promote "green design" in Greenville. The wife is helping us on a "green remodel" of our house in the same neighborhood.

Let's hope this is one of many "green" projects for homeowners!

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I'd like to see the layout of this house. I can't quite figure it out from the outside. It's interesting for sure.

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I honestly don't see how such a large house that includes a two car garage could be considered earth friendly.

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I honestly don't see how such a large house that includes a two car garage could be considered earth friendly.

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I honestly don't see how such a large house that includes a two car garage could be considered earth friendly.

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Point made, but I think "earth friendly" may be somewhat relative, especially locally. Granted I know nothing about the project, but it seems it would have to be a step in the right direction.

Anybody know anything more about the property?

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So what are you saying? To be earth friendly it needs to be small and the owners need to park outside?

This is the same kind of garbage you hear spewed from politicians who zoom around in private jets telling us how we need to be saving fuel.

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Now that you mention it, yes. And how about a house built around a lifestyle where you don't need two cars. Anyone can put up a sign saying earth friendly but I note this house from the limited information we have here doesn't seem to have any aspects of a sustainable design.

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....... it would be ludicrous to be expected to build as though it did.

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Here is a list of things you can generally incorporate into the building of a house that would make it more earth friendly:

-Higher insulation in walls, roof, floor and windows.

-Using materials that are harvested and manufactured within a 500 mile radius of the site. Helps cut down on the fuel consumption used to ship those products.

-Use rapidly renewable materials in the house like bamboo flooring as opposed to hardwood flooring.

-Using native landscaping that doesn't need to be watered, or if your landscaping does need to be watered use a drip irrigation system rather than the regular spray.

-Use low VOC emitting products inside the house for the finishes, like paint, carpet. The VOC's are the particles in the air that you smell in a freshly painted room.

-Use permeable pavement for your driveway rather than asphalt. Not only does it reduce water runoff by letting stormwater seep back into the ground but it helps reduce the heat island effect from asphalt.

-Limit the site disturbance to only the area around the house an dthe driveways. No need to clear cut the whole site, preserve as many trees as possible.

-Re-capture rainwater runoff from the gutters to use for irigation.

-Use dual flush toilets to reduce the amount of water used.

-Allow the windows to provide most of your light in the house during the day. You can use light shelves to shield the windows from direct sunlight in the summer and also to reflect light deeper into the space.

There's a ton of stuff you can do with out really thinking about it that can makea big difference.

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No it isn't when the point is whether its "earth friendly" or not. It's the developer that is choosing to put these kind of developments where there isn't any transportation. It's the developer that is calling this earth friendly and the reality that it isn't. Don't call people ludicrous on this forum.

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Its far more "earth friendly" than 99.9 percent of what else is built in Greenville. So in areas where there arent sufficient public transportation, we should just continue building as usual ?

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First off, let it be known that I am definitely in favor of people living more sustainably using any means available in an urban setting. If somwone can get by without a car then that is great, though most people in the U.S. are not mentally or financially prepared to make that move.

Until a reliable alternative system for transportation is developed, the automobile will continue to reign supreme in the U.S. But that doesn't mean that we will have to continue our dependance on oil from the Middle East or continue to fill the atmosphere with harmful fumes. Consider

as a potential solution that could enter the market fairly soon. The fact that environmental issues are important to people while high fuel costs are present creates a feasible recipe for hope at the very least. This, in my opinion would not detract from the sustainability of the home anymore than a home built near a rail line.

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No it isn't when the point is whether its "earth friendly" or not. It's the developer that is choosing to put these kind of developments where there isn't any transportation. It's the developer that is calling this earth friendly and the reality that it isn't. Don't call people ludicrous on this forum.

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So in areas where there arent sufficient public transportation, we should just continue building as usual ?

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This house is infill on Stone Avenue, just a few blocks from the city center, and probably on a GTA route (don't know the routes, but I would assume one would run down Stone or nearby). One could live here and bike or walk for all their needs. I commend these people on building green infill rather sprawl.

From what I know of this house, issues like "air leakage" through better insulation were a serious part of the design. To lower energy consumption was a key part of the design of this home.

Any step in a "green" direction is a positive step. I'm sure we all hope to see more of these homes around the area (and nation). :thumbsup:

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.....

From what I know of this house, issues like "air leakage" through better insulation were a serious part of the design. To lower energy consumption was a key part of the design of this home......

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I don't know all the specifics of this particular home. Danmire listed some very good ways to "green" a home. I for one would love to know more specifics.

I'd be happy if I could just figure out how to get my trash under control (and I recycle everything I can). As part of only a two person household, I think my partner and I produce WAY too much trash.

What I like about these types of homes, is that aside from being much greener than my own home, they drive the discussion of "green". While the signs in front may sometimes be self serving for the contractor on one hand, they spark attention and awareness of green practices. Each little bit of dialogue and education on green practices pays dividends for all. :thumbsup:

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No it isn't when the point is whether its "earth friendly" or not. It's the developer that is choosing to put these kind of developments where there isn't any transportation. It's the developer that is calling this earth friendly and the reality that it isn't. Don't call people ludicrous on this forum.

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I honestly don't see how such a large house that includes a two car garage could be considered earth friendly.

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