Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

crowe1856

King Cotton & O'Henry hotels/downtown evolution

7 posts in this topic

Anyone know the history or condition of these two buildings that led them to be torn down rather than refurbished or reused? I've only been in Greensboro three years, but it seems hardly possible given the current state of infill that these buildings stood on the only suitable land for a parking deck & the ridiculous N&R parcel. In a great many cities outside of NC, it's old buildings like the aforementioned hotels (along with warehouses) that would be converted into condos & apartments, or modernized to serve their original purpose; thereby preserving a city's character and density. Greensboro's current push to infill with new condo buildings & rumors of downtown hotels makes it all seem somewhat ass-backwards, and I'm hoping someone can provide an explanation other than poor planning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Documents at the Library of Congress' website state that there was fire damage at the O'Henry, but it doesn't give any information about where or how bad the damage was. My best guess about the King Cotton is that it was simply abandoned and considered a 'blight' or something. I'd imagine the News & Record building (which replaced it) was considered to be a model for urban renewel when it was built.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember asking my father to take me to downtown Greensboro to watch the wrecking ball work on the O'Henry. It really was a large building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I think the King Cotton should be rebuilt the way the O'Henry was rebuilt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I could tell from research, neither hotel had become derelict, but they were losing business rapidly to the more modern suburban chain hotels when they were closed. They were demo'd because the land under them became more valuable than the hotels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
From what I could tell from research, neither hotel had become derelict, but they were losing business rapidly to the more modern suburban chain hotels when they were closed. They were demo'd because the land under them became more valuable than the hotels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a postcard photo of the King Cotton (corner of East Market & Davie Streets) If only this building could have been saved. It would have been great to see it converted into luxury apartments today. The King Cotton was the same age as the Guilford Building. Both were built in 1926.

2104899354_36d5eb32ca_o.jpg

In comparison here is the King Cotton in Memphis. It too was demolished

60194045_d032158d74.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.