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ZachariahDaMan

Old Ann Arbor postcards

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I bought these 2 postcards the other day in Williamston. Feel free to post yours if you have any.

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"The history of the University of Michigan dates back to 1821, sixteen years before Michigan became a state. Then it was known as the Catholepistemiad. Today it is one of the world's msot complete institutions of learning."

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"Baird Carillon, Burton Memorial Tower. 200 feet high. Ohio limestone. 53 bells. Largest 12 tons. Smallest 12 pounds. Donated by Charles Baird. Alumnus. Cost $75,000.00. Tower cost $175,000.00 obtained by public subscription. Third largest in the world."

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"The Legal Research Library at the University of Michigan forms a part of the beautiful Law Quadrangle presented to the University by the late William W. Cook, A.B., '80, LL.B., '82 of New York City. In the building is housed the largest law library west of the Alleghenies, containing about 177,447 volumes and currently receiving some 1,050 periodicals. The University of Michigan Law School was established in 1859."

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"Ann Arbor was settled before Michigan became a state. It has retained a distinctive charm that has made it one of the most attractive academic center in the country. The University has grown proprotionately far more than the city."

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"The University of Michigan Union provides complete recreational and eating facilities for men students and alumni of the University and their guests. In addition, the Union has over two hundred guest rooms, which are open for use by alumni, parents of students and guests of the University."

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Great postcards Zach. I've seen a lot of vintage images of AA, but these are rare, especially to find ones of individual buildings.

Just thought I mention, the Simpson Memorial Institute (second image in the post) is due to receive a good sized addition on the back. I heard the addition will not harm the historical character the building. I'm wondering if all that stuff in the university's architectural salvage will be put to good use?

Also, the third building (school of public health) received a massive addition that is now complete. Restorations I think are still underway with the original building though.

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Those are awesome!

But seriously, who would want to receive a postcard of the school of public health?

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Actually, these postcards were intended to impress. The recipient would say "Wow, U of M has some impressive modern buildings" What it was didn't matter so much, rather that U of M was a state of the art campus.

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01-06-2008093611PM.jpg

This is across the street from house. Hasn't changed a bit.

The church in the first photo is located on the corner of William and State. It received a brand new slate roof last year. If that shot was taken today, Plaza Tower would appear on the far right of the photo.

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It's a gorgeous church. From this angle, it actually reminds me of the Castle Museum in Saginaw.

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01-06-2008093728PM.jpg

Anybody notice that this was the original U of M campus "The Red Brick Campus" which was almost entirely leveled for the construction of the campus we have today. Only 1 building stands today.. Tappan Hall

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01-06-2008093728PM.jpg

Anybody notice that this was the original U of M campus "The Red Brick Campus" which was almost entirely leveled for the construction of the campus we have today. Only 1 building stands today.. Tappan Hall

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West Engineering (West Hall) was not built until a little later after this photo was taken. The year of its completion is commonly mistaken. Construction started in 1904, with the long part (where the naval tank was) to be complete in 1910. but delays forced its completion to 1929. The spires had an identical height to those on the library, so they would have been visible in this photo.

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West Engineering (West Hall) was not built until a little later after this photo was taken. The year of its completion is commonly mistaken. Construction started in 1904, with the long part (where the naval tank was) to be complete in 1910. but delays forced its completion to 1929. The spires had an identical height to those on the library, so they would have been visible in this photo.

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I need to revise that entry then on my website. I actually got my source from the Bentley as well, from a book that chronicled U construction prior to the 50's.

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