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monsoon

Tokyo

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We were attempting to put it into terms that are commonly used on UrbanPlanet. It was the 23 wards that we were calling Tokyo city. We recognize the term "city" really has no consistant definition. This is true even within the USA.

well... i think i am trying to say that there is litterally no "city of tokyo". no mayor or city boundary or anything. Each city and ward has their own "mayor" figure, as well as one all powerful Governor of the "Tokyo Met" (Tokyo-to). All of the (normally city-run) government-run things like police and the fire department, etc are run by the Tokyo Prefectoral Government. So, when considering population if does get sort of confusing. You can only really consider the Tokyo population as the whole prefecture. That is why when you look up the population of Tokyo most of the time, it lists it around 12,000,000.

Anyway. Maybe it's not all as important as I am making it out to be.

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well... i think i am trying to say that there is litterally no "city of tokyo". no mayor or city boundary or anything. Each city and ward has their own "mayor" figure, as well as one all powerful Governor of the "Tokyo Met" (Tokyo-to). All of the (normally city-run) government-run things like police and the fire department, etc are run by the Tokyo Prefectoral Government. So, when considering population if does get sort of confusing. You can only really consider the Tokyo population as the whole prefecture. That is why when you look up the population of Tokyo most of the time, it lists it around 12,000,000.

Anyway. Maybe it's not all as important as I am making it out to be.

In short, the complete picture that is "Tokyo" can be seen as a city-state or some kind of veriation on that theme. Right?

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I don't think city-states had governments under them though. I'm guessing more along the lines of a county, or maybe a small state which is completely urbanised.

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In short, the complete picture that is "Tokyo" can be seen as a city-state or some kind of veriation on that theme. Right?

more like a state that just happens to be a large metro area. The largest municipal population within Tokyo prefecture is still under a million (Setagaya-ku: 810,897). the 23-wards USED to be part of what was the "city of tokyo", but since 1945 all of the wards have become independant cities.

So yeah, it's basicly a state that is completely urbanized. Or county :)

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Tokyo is very impressive, I must admit. But to say that it makes NYC look like a village is nonsense. Emporis Buildings (www.emporis.com) ranks NYC #2 in terms of its skyline (behink Hong Kong) vs. Tokyo, which ranked #9.

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I'll admit Tokyo's skyline isn't that great, but it well makes up for that in streetscapes.

I wouldn't even rate NYC's skyline as all that great either.

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Tokyo is very impressive, I must admit. But to say that it makes NYC look like a village is nonsense. Emporis Buildings (www.emporis.com) ranks NYC #2 in terms of its skyline (behink Hong Kong) vs. Tokyo, which ranked #9.

Emporis isn't exactly known for its accuracy. In any case, while Tokyo doesn't have a huge number of tall buildings because its in earthquake territory, its the scale of the development there that is mind boggling. Manhattan would simply be a single ward in Tokyo which stretches to the horizon, add in Yokohama, and the extended urban area and you are talking about constant uninterrupted development that seems endless. There is nothing like this in North America, and most westerners are quite taken back by Tokyo in how far behind NYC is in comparison.

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post-4857-1162723903_thumb.jpg

I love Tokyo. It is more multiracial than I thought. It is one of the best world cities I have visited. As a matter of fact it is my favorite world city. This pic is kinda of fuzzy but that is Yokohama in the background taken from the Tokyo tower.

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Those pics are fantastic, and I think you're right on in labeling Tokyo a "21st century city" - for reasons beyond the visuals in the pics, as I think we're seeing Asian pop culture exert a global influence that is unprecedented, ditto for cinematic and literary crossovers, and the economic power is already well-discussed. People like Akira Kurosawa and Yasujiro Ozu are more popular internationally than they ever were during their lifetimes.

Maybe one day we'll get a USA Shinkansen - Florida to New England: East Coast Bullet Trains :blink:

...Or a 21st Century Carolina Kurosawa (or Ozu) - working from Wilmington's studio complex, of course, crafting a series of epics steeped in the paradoxes of Southern history and culture, and dramas charting the paradoxes of the New South...

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Emporis isn't exactly known for its accuracy. In any case, while Tokyo doesn't have a huge number of tall buildings because its in earthquake territory, its the scale of the development there that is mind boggling. Manhattan would simply be a single ward in Tokyo which stretches to the horizon, add in Yokohama, and the extended urban area and you are talking about constant uninterrupted development that seems endless. There is nothing like this in North America, and most westerners are quite taken back by Tokyo in how far behind NYC is in comparison.

Tokyo loses to NYC by over 2000 highrises. I refuse to believe emporis is that inaccruate. Maybe Tokyo has taller sprawl overall, but for major buildings and especially skyline, Tokyo doesnt compare to NYC. The only city in the world that contends with NYC is Hong Kong.

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Tokyo loses to NYC by over 2000 highrises. I refuse to believe emporis is that inaccruate. Maybe Tokyo has taller sprawl overall, but for major buildings and especially skyline, Tokyo doesnt compare to NYC. The only city in the world that contends with NYC is Hong Kong.

^ This is indeed true, people are comparing apples to oranges anyway. NYC specifically Manhattan is a skyline juggernaut. Tokyo is extremely developed, they have a continuous radius of buildings that just go on and on. Don't get me wrong I love Tokyo, people here just seem to be snubbing one of the most urban cities in the world.

nycanyon.jpg

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I am in Tokyo right now (and will share some pics). I personally don't think Tokyo comes close to the feel of a New York or Chicago. The sprawl is enormous (but really, really bland). They do have some cool buildings, but you can really feel that they are just recovering from a 15 year recession. There are plenty of new buildings going up but it is very spread out with small clusters of high rises.

Most of the buildings are 10-12 stories tall with an occasional 40 story building. Big skyscrapers are more rare, and it is interesting because the major conglomerates kind of stay away from each other. I am staying in an area that is mainly developed by Mitsubishi (Tokyo Station / Marunouchi area) while my office is in Nihonbashi, which is developed mainly by Matsui.

I always get a "Miami Vice" feel when I am here as far as the low-rise buildings. But I should catch some shots of some pretty good architecture (the Merrill Lynch building is awesome, just need to download the pictures).

Also seems to be a lot of activity at Tokyo Disney, which strangely, sits right next to the expressway.

Joe

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This is the Coredo (Merrill Lynch) building in the Nihomboshi district of Tokyo. It is a very cool building. I'll try to add a shot of the front of the building but it is a hard shot to get (and look good).

575616141_ff0d8f97a2_b.jpg

Joe

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I really want to visit one day.....now if only I can learn to speak Japanese.

Stupid me, I speak French and English, then learned spanish in High school. I want to learn an eastern language.

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^Stupid you. You only knoe THREE languages!? That is sooo 1990's!

Seriously though. You can see tokyo from outer space with the naked eye! Granted, you can also see new york but it's not as big. Less than half actually.

Tokyo from space according to google maps (the grayish area around the green arrow):

Tokyosatalite.jpg

Now that is a HUGE city. Needs to be though. Roughly 33 million people live in metro tokyo making it the most populous city in the world.

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.......

Now that is a HUGE city. Needs to be though. Roughly 33 million people live in metro tokyo making it the most populous city in the world.

The definition of the Tokyo metro is different than that in the USA and is simply an arbitrary circle drawn around the center of the city. Using the same definition of development NYC's metro would only include the 5 boroughs. The developed area above is known as the Kanto region and respresents an continuously developed urban area of over 50 million people. There is nothing like it in North America not even close.

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The definition of the Tokyo metro is different than that in the USA and is simply an arbitrary circle drawn around the center of the city. Using the same definition of development NYC's metro would only include the 5 boroughs. The developed area above is known as the Kanto region and respresents an continuously developed urban area of over 50 million people. There is nothing like it in North America not even close.

:shok:

I didnt know that! 50 million!? Good grief! I must have read the 30 something million as people living inside the wards or something. I was about to move to Tokyo before personal issues came up that prevented me from moving for the time being. I researched Tokyo for a long time and even halfway learned Japanese. Shinjuku has got to be the hands down best streetscape in the world. Oh wait, Shibuya crossing ties shinjuku.

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Here is a great time lapse video of Tokyo:

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'5 Tokyo experiences you won't forget'

2. Bullet trains

I'm quite jealous of Japan's rail system. It's thorough, comfortable and, as you may have heard, fast. The Shinkansen train reaches speeds of almost 200 miles per hour. Japan Rail (in Japan it's referred to by the English acronym "JR") covers most of the main islands of Japan, so you can get just about anywhere you want to go by train.

Couple that with an extensive metro in Tokyo and other cities, and you can get from the plane to many of the country's best attractions without ever getting in a cab.

The Shinkansen compares well to flying, getting you from city to city in about the same time. But there are no lines, and delays are very rare. There's no free beverage service, but there are frequent vendors with carts cruising the aisles, selling delicious treats ranging from snacks to bento box meals. The ride is very pleasant and quiet. And if you miss a train, it's usually not long until the next one.

For foreign visitors (and Japanese living overseas), there is a great deal available in the Japan Rail Pass, which allows for unlimited travel for a set period. This allows a great deal of flexibility, because most trains have cars without reserved seats, so you can hop on any time.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/07/15/tokyo.five.experiences/index.html?iref=obnetwork

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