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monsoon

Are you afraid of products from China?

Are you afraid of products coming from China?   17 members have voted

  1. 1. If so, do you plan to change buying habits?

    • Yes
      10
    • No
      7

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50 posts in this topic

Seems like there are revelations coming out every day about the terrible the products coming out of Communist China. Just this week they have discovered dangerous chemicals in toothpaste manufactured there and they are asking everyone to throw it out if it came from there. Along with this are the ban of numerous species of fish that were raised in toxic chemicals used to keep disease down in fetid unsanitary conditions these fish were raise in. (just this week)

We have already had the pet food scare, the tonka toy scare, and numerous others. This is one of the reasons that products are cheaper coming out of China. That is they don't follow the rules and safety regulations that we have here in the USA for the manufacture of products.

What should be done about this?

(Why is it that in every other country in the world, products coming from Communist China are label "People's Republic of China", but here in the USA it's just China?)

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I wouldn't say I'm afraid of their products, but I am very wary of them and try to avoid them if I can. IIRC, some of the toothpaste was labeled 'Made in South Africa,' even though it was really made in China. At least that is what I saw on a couple of newscasts. How did THAT happen?

As for the parenthetical question: I didn't know about that. I wonder why that is myself....

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Indeed. It should be noted that food products such as the fish have no requirement on labeling as to the country it came from.

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Does ANY food have to be labeled as to country of origon? Maybe the FDA should require a country of origon and percentage that country provides, like the government requires on new cars.

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Actually there was a law passed in 2003 that requires labeling of food to show country of orgin. The Bush Administration has told the FDA however not to enforce the law.

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I am not opposed to purchasing products from China as a significant number of products purchased are already fully or partially manufactured in China. What I am opposed to is food or hygiene products coming from China such as fish and toothpaste.

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I will say that I plan on purchasing nothing further from China that is edible for myself or my pets! I will also scrutinize all future purchases.

I do think the Chinese are starting to realize they have to clamp down, but it won't happen quickly.

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I do think the Chinese are starting to realize they have to clamp down, but it won't happen quickly.

Which will likely drive prices higher forcing countries to purchase goods made in countries other than China. China is ruining any reputation they had by not enforcing higher standards.

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I'm not afraid, but I won't be purchasing anything else that was manufactured in the People's Republic of China.

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I am definitely not eating anymore fish from China, either wild caught or farm raised. I simply cannot trust it anymore thanks to the one local tv station's investigative reporting (don't remember which one).

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Does ANY food have to be labeled as to country of origon? Maybe the FDA should require a country of origon and percentage that country provides, like the government requires on new cars.

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Does ANY food have to be labeled as to country of origon? Maybe the FDA should require a country of origon and percentage that country provides, like the government requires on new cars.

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Word is now now that Chinese made tires are dethreading on the road and killing people. The company that imported these tires says it does not have the money to recall them. Guess who will end up paying for this.

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Im not "afraid" of Chinese products, per-se. I just think most of them suck and are poorley manufactured, like the moped i bought. POS got the key stuck in it and ripped out the whole mechanism. I was stuck starting it with an effing screwdriver. Then the frame cracked.

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it's difficult to avoid chinese products. though i switched fairly recently to tom's of maine toothpaste and it was the best switch i've ever made. it's the least harsh of any toothpaste i've used and still quite effective at keeping them clean and even whitening them a bit and i don't use the whitening one. their baking soda one is the only baking soda toothpaste i've seen that's ADA approved.

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I buy local produce at farmer's markets and local co-ops, and purchase household items that are manufactured in the U.S. and are either organic or are all natural. As for clothes, not buying from China is extremely hard to do, but most of the organic cotton t-shirts I buy nowadays are manufactured in Mexico or in some obscure European or South American country.

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The communist government in China is turning a blind eye to all sorts of unscrupulous business activites. Does China even have an oversite beurocracy for food and drug purity?

One of the whackiest things about China's business philosophy is that the government rarely recognizes copyrights. When a new Hollywood film is released on DVD, Chinese factories start cranking out copies like there's no tommorrow. And of course with no copyright payments......

Take a peek on iOffer sometime, where DVD sets can be bought from China, for 20% what the same set would cost if made under legal circumstances.

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The communist government in China is turning a blind eye to all sorts of unscrupulous business activites. Does China even have an oversite beurocracy for food and drug purity?

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Yet another recall of toys made in China. The Mattell Company is smarting over all these difficulties---again for excessive amounts of lead paint on toys.

God this is cliche, and please forgive me folks but: you get what you pay for. When American companies buy toys in China, to resell in the States, they pay next to nothing for it. When prices are super low, isn't it obvious that the merchandise is pure junk?

All those Chinese container ships bringing in stuff to the States---and the majority of it is probably pure crapola.

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^ Agreed. The really troubling part is that if you try and NOT buy Chinese-made products, you end up purchasing nothing. At least one component on virtually everything is manufactured there. We did an exercise in my Geography of the Global Economy class last semester where we looked at the labeling of everything in our room. Shoes, pants, underwear, desks, computers, shirts, jackets, umbrellas, books, backpacks, purses, televisions, infocus projector, etc. Nearly all of it was made in China.

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Afraid? No. But I've always avoided Chinese stuff when I can. I think very few people realize how wide-open vulnerable we leave our economy to them buy buying from them as we do.

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It's easy to bash China for producing junk, for being a basket case dictatorship, for being what is essentially a rogue nation...

But I have to offer a bit of balance about Chinese manufacturing, just out of fairness. Four years ago we renovated a historic house and hand made all the draperies for the house. We went a little overboard and went all out on the design and trim of the draperies.

We began chosing trims and tassels, etc and it became clear right away they were all made in China. (before 1995 or so, such textiles were made in Spain and Italy) Well guess what folks, the quality was EXCELLENT. As good as any textile execution I've seen in Italian and Spanish goods. And about half the cost too.

A few years ago my partner bought a violin made in China. Unbelievable price, and amazingly the quality is high too. The violin case alone was worth the cost of the violin. He had several pros look at the violin, and they all agreed it is a well made instrument, as good as those made in Europe.

Just wanted to add a little balance to the debate. However I am VERY wary of Chinese products.

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This isn't China's fault. It's the fault of American corporate greed. If they really wanted good quality control on their products, they could demand it, but it would cost them a few extra cents in profit. Instead they turn a blind eye while these toys are contracted out to basically slave shops with horrible working conditions. This is why a Barbee doll cost 30 cents to make in China which Mattel sells for $20 in the USA. Profits, all profits.

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Well, sure they want to make a profit, but you have to trust your suppliers to some extent. As soon as they start supplying you bad product, you either terminate them, or make sure they recify the problem.

When I was spec-ing parts in private industry, I took low bid if the product was of comparable quality or if the higherquality was in areas where it wasn't needed. I also changed vendors when the products started sliding. It isn't so much greed as it is business 101.

I even looked at Chinese parts, but the quality wasn't very high compared to US offerings, and they had long lead times, something that you can deal with in the toy industry.

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