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krazeeboi

SC cities and traffic congestion

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I found this report online by the Reason Foundation, which is a libertarian think tank (keep that in mind when analyzing their findings), about traffic congestion in our cities now and in the year 2030. This report's biggest downfall is that mass transit isn't even in the picture whatsoever (these folks emphasize the "free market," so that would explain that), but it still contains useful information. The larger report of which what's posted here is only a portion also finds that North Dakota and South Carolina have nation

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Interesting. I don't have much use for the Reason Foundation's ideas, but these stats are interesting none the less.

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Well, this makes perfect sense considering Chas only has 1 main interstate and 1 incomplete beltloop. Several things need to occur to accomodate traffic in Chas, especially for hurricane evac prep:

  • Widen I-26 completely from downtown to Summerville (yes, again)

  • Create a mass transit monobeam system from DT to S'ville (multiple stops in the Neck, airport, and shopping areas)

  • Create branches for the monobeam systems to Citadel Mall in WA and Mt. P Town Center (with a stop on Daniel Island)

  • Construct a new East-West interstate spurring from Glenn McConnell to intersect with I-95, and end in Augusta (I-14)

  • Widen I-526

If all of these things were accomplished, traffic would be well-accomodated. IMO, of course. ;)

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Interesting. I don't have much use for the Reason Foundation's ideas, but these stats are interesting none the less.

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Just look at Greenville's stats compared to the other cities. It appears a lot more money is going to have to be spent in the upstate than other regions in order to avoid major traffic problems. Kind of surprising considering how much smaller Greenville is than Columbia and Charleston. I think that Spartanburg and Anderson might have a factor in this as they are so close.

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The projected urbanized population for each city by 2030 is interesting to me. Since the report is based on data from 2000-03, it would seem that now four years later Columbia should have just emerged as the leader in that statistic.

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I found this report online by the Reason Foundation, which is a libertarian think tank (keep that in mind when analyzing their findings), about traffic congestion in our cities now and in the year 2030. This report's biggest downfall is that mass transit isn't even in the picture whatsoever (these folks emphasize the "free market," so that would explain that), but it still contains useful information. The larger report of which what's posted here is only a portion also finds that North Dakota and South Carolina have nation

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The projected urbanized population for each city by 2030 is interesting to me. Since the report is based on data from 2000-03, it would seem that now four years later Columbia should have just emerged as the leader in that statistic.

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So Mauldin and Simpsonville is not included in the urban area? When that does happen it will add a good bit to the Greenville Urban Area. It surprises me it already isnt added considering you cant tell when you go from Greenville into mauldin or vice versa.

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Nope. Mauldin - Simpsonville at this time is not a contiguous part of the Greenville urban area, so its technically its own separate entity. If you add in Mauldin-Simpsonville, I think Gville's numbers are closer to 360k or 370k. By the next census I think it will be one large urban area, so you'll probably see a population jump for Greenville's UA when that happens.

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Greenville's figure would be around 380K with Mauldin-Simpsonville added in. If the two merge by the time of the next census, Greenville's figure will be at least 400K easy.

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That perplexed me, as Charleston already has a slightly larger UA population and is currently growing faster, so I'm not sure what those projections are based on. Also, by that time, the Mauldin-Simpsonville UA will have long been absorbed into Greenville's, so their figure will be much higher than what's projected.

Things would have been so much better for the Lowcountry is I-95 ran through Charleston.

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I expect the upstate region to further accelerate in growth and eventually lead the state in urban population number and growth. Just my opinion though.

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Ok, it took me a minute to figure out their analysis zones, as they don't make much sense at the surface... They are using the MSA counties. Thanks for that link.

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I expect the upstate region to further accelerate in growth and eventually lead the state in urban population number and growth. Just my opinion though.

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The Upstate has been rather insulated from the national housing trends, but we can't stay immune forever. I wouldn't read to much into that except that the rest of the nation is holding us back.

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^Indeed, especially when the metro area medians are compared to the statewide median price.

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The latest figures are out, which compare traffic over the first six months of 2009 to the same period last year:

67. Charleston-N. Charleston

76. Columbia

88. Greenville

The chart in the link displays changes in congestion and travel time.

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Of the three MSAs, Columbia also boasts the lowest unemployment rate and the least percentage of jobs lost in this recession, and it has always been the most centralized as far as where most of the MSA's population works is concerned: downtown. Since the figures measure traffic congestion for the first six months of 2009 compared to the first six months of 2008, and since most traffic congestion occurs when people are on the way to and from work, it makes sense to me. Even with Columbia's big grid and wide streets, it's time to get serious about mass transit.

Comparing the Greenville and Columbia MSAs' figures, again it makes sense to me when you consider the combination of Columbia's MSA gaining slightly more people than Greenville's in the latest census estimates while losing fewer jobs and having more of its workforce working downtown as opposed to Greenville's large manufacturing workforce who work at factories in the outlying areas closer to their homes.

In Charleston's case, Summerville never seemed like a good idea to me.

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According to that link, Seattle has worse traffic than Atlanta. :dontknow::huh: I've been to both cities many times. Could have fooled me.

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Comparing the Greenville and Columbia MSAs' figures, again it makes sense to me when you consider the combination of Columbia's MSA gaining slightly more people than Greenville's in the latest census estimates while losing fewer jobs and having more of its workforce working downtown as opposed to Greenville's large manufacturing workforce who work at factories in the outlying areas closer to their homes.

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Three miles from downtown is a long way out compared to the CBD.

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