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richyb83

Downtown Historical Sites

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This is a great read from Sunday's Magazine section of the Advocate. Some of this is a suprise!

http://www.2theadvocate.com/entertainment/...ne/8359077.html

A new brochure, "Baton Rouge a City of Landmarks Walking Tour," helps walkers spot historically significant buildings, sites and vintage homes.

The full-color brochure includes a map of approximately a mile and covers the North Boulevard Promenade, Capitol Park, the Riverfront, three historic districts and Central Business District, including numerous buildings on the National Register of Historic Places, and nine downtown museums.

The guide lists 46 buildings known for their historic and architectural significance. Along with each is a brief description of each landmark. As lagniappe, there's a list of downtown museums.

For example, the ceremonial Indian mound near the Old Arsenal Museum was probably constructed about A.D. 1000 and may have served as a ceremonial platform for a temple or chief's house. The Tessier-Lafayette Buildings, 342-348 Lafayette St., date from 1820 and 1840. Legend holds that the Marquis de Lafayette visited here in a return visit to the United States in 1825. The Old State Capitol, Lafayette Street and North Boulevard, an 1847 Gothic Revival structure, was gutted by fire during the Civil War, and is now a museum of political history. The State Capitol is an Art Deco masterpiece completed in 1932 by Gov. Huey P. Long at a cost of $5 million, including $1 million worth of art.

The brochures are available at the hotels, the Baton Rouge CVB office, 730 North Blvd., the Foundation for Historical Louisiana at the Old Governor's Mansion, 502 North Blvd., Capitol Park Welcome Center and The Shop at the Top on the 27th floor of the State Capitol. They also can be found at State Welcome Centers throughout Louisiana.

I'll be sure to post some of my older pics of some of these historical sites :thumbsup:

Does anyone know if this brochure is available online?

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This the Advocate map with all 46 historical sites(including museums) on the "Walking Tour".

Compliments of Dan and his scanner, thanks! :thumbsup:

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Edited by richyb83

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Central (Bogan) Fire Station - Laurel Street

# 18 on MAP

1924 Gothic Revival brick firehouse; renamed in honor of city's first paid fire chief in 1959.

Now a firefighters museum and home to The Arts Council and the Community Fund for the Arts

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Edited by richyb83

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City Club Building on North Boulevard, constructed in 1894 as the Main Post Office, became City Hall in 1935.

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^Thanks flatiger for posting that. :thumbsup:

Here is my contribution

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Please feel free yall to add any photos to this thread.

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Old Arsenal Museum

Built in 1838, this unique structure was built as a powder magazine with 54" inch thick walls and ten foot high explosion fence for the U.S. Army Post. From 1886 to 1926, the building was used as a veterinary hospital. During this time, LSU was located on the Arsenal grounds. Restored as a museum by the State Legislature in conjunction with the Secretary of State's Office and The Fondation for Historical Louisiana.

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Old State Capitol

An 1847 Gothic Revival masterpiece designed to resemble a medieval castle. Gutted by fire during the Civil War. Now museum of political history.

downtown010na3.jpg

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Tessier Bldg. "a.k.a" Lafayette Street gallery

Elaborate ironwork and upstairs galleries are reminiscent of the French Quarter and Natchez MS.

Legend has it that the Marquis de Lafayette made a speech from the balcony in 1825.

*circa 1820

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U.S.S. Kidd & Naval War Museum

A WWII Fletcher Class Destroyer restored to 1945 configuration as a floating museum and national landmark. One of America's most famous fighting ships named after Rear Admmiral Isaac C. Kidd, who was killed aboard his flagship, the U.S. Arizona, during the suprise attack on Pearl Harbor. The Nautical Historic Museum adjacent to the vessel contains complementary exhibits and visitors. The top vessel in America for hosting military reunions.

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This is what this thread was/is all about. If it still stood today?? It really would have added to the flavor of vintage Third Street. This should have been at the top of the list.

>>How far is too far??<< This was the BIGGEST MISTAKE of a demolition downtown; as they say, "the straw that broke the camels back" may have been what set the Historical Preservation going for Baton Rouge?? My Dad still complains to this day that the old Paramount Theatre on Third Street was torn down where the parking garage now stands. He talks how nice the inside of the place was also. It looks to be at least three stories high for the balconies. What a shame this is no more!

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Vintage photograph of the Paramount, with its Greek Revival facade and Art Deco marquee

Photo courtesy of the Library of CongressOnce described as the most thoroughly equipped and scientifically built motion picture play house in the South, this theater replaced the old Columbia Theatre after its 1919 demolition.

The Columbia was the first theater in the United States to have lights lining the aisles.

It was renamed the Paramount Theatre around 1937.

The Paramount was demolished in 1979.

Contributed by Jack Van Leer

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One of the BEST things to happen for the re-birth of Downtown Baton Rouge! And most important restoration/renovation too!! A nice compliment to the Shaw Center for the Arts.

Hotel Heidelberg-1927 (Capitol House)

201 Lafayette Street

This 10-story Spanish Renaissance style hotel was designed by Edward F. Field, was the economic and socail centerpiece of downtown BR. It's historical and political associations date most notably to when it was the unofficial HQ's for Governor Huey P. Long's administration (1928-1932).With the 1950's International Style addition, the property was called the Capitol House.

This monumental, meticulous restoration utilized federal & state historic preservation tax credits. After being closed in 1985 the grand reopening was held a little over a year ago as the Hilton Capitol Center.

* Member of the prestigious Historic Hotels of America

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This historic hotel is a must see with unique interior architecture; from the Ballroom on the top floor to the pool deck on the 3rd floor overlooking the river! :shades:

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Fuqua Hardware Building(left) circa 1905 on Third Street and Laurel. The Wine Loft and it's HQ's as well as the RiverPlace Hospitality Center are some of the tenants. To the right the Belisle Building (circa 1912) added a modern 3rd floor and is now MAPP Construction's new HQ's

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Downtown could include historic district

About 30 historic downtown buildings could qualify for federal and state tax credits for renovations, officials from the state Division of Historic Preservation said today. To create a downtown National Register Historic District, the city-parish must issue a letter of support, then receive approval from the state and federal governments. Buildings would have to be at least 50 years old, maintain their historic look, and reflect the historic significance of the area, which in this case would be the prosperity of Baton Rouge following the oil boom, officials said. Such a designation would not restrict the use of properties within the district.

http://www.businessreport.com/archives/daily-report/latest/

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District considered for register; Historic designation would qualify Third Street buildings for tax credit

A state review committee will consider whether to put a stretch of Third Street on the National Register of Historic Places, which would give dozens of qualifying buildings there access to a federal tax credit if they are restored.; a majority of buildings within a district must be at least 50 years old; be historically or architecturally important; and outwardly convey its importance

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Of course the Paramount Theatre made the list...and the old Istrouma hotel was at a great location..a dreaded surface parking lot now sits there

Lost Buildings...Lecture series program highlights former Baton Rouge structures

“Choosing your favorite building is like choosing your favorite child or your favorite pet,” John Sykes, education manager of the Louisiana State Museum-Baton Rouge, told a group at “Lost Baton Rouge: The Top Ten Buildings We Wish Were Still Here.” The program was part of “Lectures at the Mound Spring Series” sponsored by BREC’s Magnolia Mound Plantation.

Sykes explained the difficulty he had in choosing just 10 buildings when he provided his list of the Spanish Commandant’s Residence, the Heroman Building, Tunnard’s Emporium, the Institute for the Deaf & Dumb, old Temple B’nai Israel, Arc en Ciel, the William Garig House, Istrouma Hotel, Our Lady of the Lake Sanitarium and the Paramount Theater.

Designed by a local architect and built in 1903 at the southeast corner of North 3rd Street and Florida Boulevard, the Istrouma was the city’s first modern hotel. It helped lead the development of Third Street into Baton Rouge’s commercial center. It was torn down in 1969.

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Designed by a prominent New Orleans architect and built in 1923, the original Our Lady of the Lake building’s opening marked a major improvement in medical treatment in the area. U.S. Sen. Huey P. Long died there in September 1935. It was demolished in 1984.

http://www.2theadvocate.com/features/91874194.html

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Wasn't sure where to put this. The apartment building on North Blvd known as The Prince has been undergoing renovations for a few weeks now. It's the building with the curved windows. It's good to see the landlord investing some money in this place to keep it looking nice. People always seem to remember this building. I hope they aren't converting it into offices.

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nquint1...Not sure which building you are talking about??

Could it possibly be this one?? Or am I way off here??

feb07003.jpg

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nquint1...Not sure which building you are talking about??

Could it possibly be this one?? Or am I way off here??

Yep, that's the one. It looks a lot different right now because they've ripped up all the landscaping except for the palm tree on the corner. My curiosity is starting to get the better of me, and I think I'm going to walk over there and try to peek around. I'll let you know if I do.

Edited by nquint1

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Yep, that's the one. It looks a lot different right now because they've ripped up all the landscaping except for the palm tree on the corner. My curiosity is starting to get the better of me, and I think I'm going to walk over there and try to peak around. I'll let you know if I do.

those could be classy art deco apartments

Edited by hagetaka

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The rain finally stopped enough for me to walk over there and have a peek. They've gutted all the kitchens and bathrooms, but so far have left all the walls in place. The building is bigger than I thought with four one-bedroom and four two-bedroom units. One of the units on the second floor has a great view of downtown. I wish i had a camera to take a photo of it. Seems like a good time for them to do this with all the attention North Blvd has been and is about to receive.

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Nice to see the revitalization continue Downtown ; BR's oldest structure is being revamped into residential & office space....the 8,000 sq ft property was built in 1762. Article mentions the property will have a view of the river that would not be obstructed by a high-rise development proposed by Richard Preis.

Plans for Historic Lafayette building announced

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/business/Plans-for-historic-BR-building-announced.html

feb07049.jpg

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