Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

RemusCal

Fayetteville-Center of Environmental Sustainability

104 posts in this topic

Don't know if you guys saw this in today's paper, but I thought it deserved its own topic. This could be absolutely huge in 10 - 20 years. Similar to Silicone Valley in California. I think it is definitely possible and Fayetteville has just about everything in place for this to happen.

EDITED DUE TO RULES VIOLATION

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Sounds great. Even if it doesn't end up being THE center, it seems like we could end up being on of the major centers for it. It would be nice for us to have something outside the university.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't know if you guys saw this in today's paper, but I thought it deserved its own topic. This could be absolutely huge in 10 - 20 years. Similar to Silicone Valley in California. I think it is definitely possible and Fayetteville has just about everything in place for this to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sounds great. Even if it doesn't end up being THE center, it seems like we could end up being on of the major centers for it. It would be nice for us to have something outside the university.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I work with Jon Johnson and I can tell you he is one of the smartest and most capable people we have at the Walton College, someone who really "gets it." He will do a great job with this center and make it something that we can all be proud of. There is also a "sustainability breakfast group" meeting that is taking place with some of those who are interested in this topic from our area. It is meeting once a month--I was at the first meeting--the second will be held next week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There won't be anything even resembling a Silicone Valley in Fayetteville or anywhere else in Arkansas for that matter. There's a lot of college students in Fayetteville, but the advancd technology training and tech-based workforce required for any large-scale biotechnology industry to develop here is non-existent. This "idea" of Mr. Rust is nothing more than hogwash (pun intended). Even if this "idea" becomes reality it will only have it's start in Fayetteville, but I can assure you it will be developed into something major elsewhere.

Just my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There won't be anything even resembling a Silicone Valley in Fayetteville or anywhere else in Arkansas for that matter. There's a lot of college students in Fayetteville, but the advancd technology training and tech-based workforce required for any large-scale biotechnology industry to develop here is non-existent. This "idea" of Mr. Rust is nothing more than hogwash (pun intended). Even if this "idea" becomes reality it will only have it's start in Fayetteville, but I can assure you it will be developed into something major elsewhere.

Just my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think thats fair.

I'm skeptical myself, but as I understand it, "sustainability" as an industry can encompass many different disciplines like architecture, horticulture, chemical engineering, as well as some techno-industry.

I think the biggest factor that may help NWA in developing some kind of core of "sustainability"-related industries is the presence of Wal-Mart, and the impact their implementation of any newly developed technologies or practices could have on business practices nationwide, and worldwide for that matter.

The idea of "sustainability" as an industry for NWA is somewhat vague, but I think the comparison to Silicon Valley simply is used to bring forward the idea of having a cluster of related firms pursuing the same overall goals in the same general vicinity. Not that it would be another Silicon Valley as in a computer telecom-based corridor, but, well, "sustainability" industries grouped together, sharing technology, workforce, and most importantly, having the ear of Wal-Mart and the larger retail community via their close proximity across the holler and through the woods to the north.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


There won't be anything even resembling a Silicone Valley in Fayetteville or anywhere else in Arkansas for that matter. There's a lot of college students in Fayetteville, but the advancd technology training and tech-based workforce required for any large-scale biotechnology industry to develop here is non-existent. This "idea" of Mr. Rust is nothing more than hogwash (pun intended). Even if this "idea" becomes reality it will only have it's start in Fayetteville, but I can assure you it will be developed into something major elsewhere.

Just my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No way will NWA ever be Silicon Valley. We're simply not as pretentious as the Bay area. However this idea of a sustainability center of America is a real potential. Fact is there's not one. Only in recent years has such a center even been possible. Why can Fayetteville not assume the role and really cash in on an industry capable of producing trillions in the years to come. No one else has and the U of A believe it or not has quite the pool of trainees in various fields i.e. Engineering, Landscape Architecture, Architecture, as well as various fields of business just to mention a few. Maybe not as many as some universities but the fact is they are there. Something for sure nowhere else in Arkansas has and with the incentives being laid for "super sites" across Arkansas by Governor Beebe or even with Wal-Marts involvement I think this could be a real possibility.

You build the workforce by having various entities set up shop at the research park and you go from there. Don't be such a Negative Nancy. If this were to actually happen Fayetteville would definitely take on a power role in the south if not the United States. You've got the minds at the University, The money in the local corporations and a chance to strike while the iron is really hot. Whether or not it will happen is purely speculative, however the groundwork is there, it's just whether or not people choose to invest. It's a good idea, and it's definitely better than basing an entire community around retail!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the biggest factor that may help NWA in developing some kind of core of "sustainability"-related industries is the presence of Wal-Mart, and the impact their implementation of any newly developed technologies or practices could have on business practices nationwide, and worldwide for that matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't count on Wal-Mart too much. The only reason Wal-Mart is feigning concern about the environment is to clean up their image and gain acceptance in regions that are anti-Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart's sustainability test site is in McKinney, TX; not Fayetteville, AR. Wal-Mart already has several sustainability initiatives in place so they may not really have much need for investment into new initiatives, unless those initiatives would make an impact on Wal-Mart's bottom line. But, let's face it, sustainability isn't a cheap alternative to waste. Building green buildings costs more than traditional buildings, especially in Wal-Mart's case; so unless they're trying to build a store in Chicago, Boston or New York City I wouldn't expect it to be green.

Anyway, Fayetteville is already involved in agricultural science via the Arkansas Agricultural Research and Extension Center (AAREC). I know, it sounds more glamorous than it really is and it's been there for years, yet it hasn't made much of an impact on Fayetteville's image as a technology center or a "Silicon Valley." So what real impact would a small experimental soy bean farm in Fayetteville really make? Probably the same impact that a small experimental farm in north Fayetteville has.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's not just about an experimental soy bean farm. Your clearly not informed on exactly what the sustainability movement is. It's just like those damn bike lanes on Crossover road, sustainability is coming whether you capitalize on it or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before anyone begins analyzing the cost of building green, you should actually look up figures. By the way, Sam's Club in Fayetteville is being built Green by Crossland. If it was that expensive or cost prohibitive does anyone think Wal-Mart would even consider it? You should look at the returns before looking at the economics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As it's been pointed out earlier, there isn't any center yet that focuses on this. Yes it will be hard work as was also mentioned earlier. But even if Fayetteville isn't THE center, it can still be one of the major sites for this. There are also a lot of misconceptions about going green. It doesn't mean having to totally change the entire world and US economy. While there are some who would want that I think most of us realize it's not realistic. We can all make 'green' decisions that don't make huge changes in our lives but does make a difference to the environment. Lots of small things can quickly add up. Is Wal-mart doing this for their image. Sure, but at the same time Wal-mart has been at the cutting edge of other things as well. I think Wal-mart isn't just doing this to clean up it's image. This is going to be a bigger movement and Wal-mart is smart enough to get onboard early.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


As it's been pointed out earlier, there isn't any center yet that focuses on this. Yes it will be hard work as was also mentioned earlier. But even if Fayetteville isn't THE center, it can still be one of the major sites for this. There are also a lot of misconceptions about going green. It doesn't mean having to totally change the entire world and US economy. While there are some who would want that I think most of us realize it's not realistic. We can all make 'green' decisions that don't make huge changes in our lives but does make a difference to the environment. Lots of small things can quickly add up. Is Wal-mart doing this for their image. Sure, but at the same time Wal-mart has been at the cutting edge of other things as well. I think Wal-mart isn't just doing this to clean up it's image. This is going to be a bigger movement and Wal-mart is smart enough to get onboard early.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This would be great if the crazy city gov. does not stamp it out because it may require a sewer tap or have to have a road next to it. If only one neighbor complains that construction on a campus for sustainability would create dust, noise or traffic during construction, the City would try to kill the project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Logistics company adds office in Fayetteville for Sustainability Push

Well, as city leaders predicted, it is starting to happen. This is the first of, I believe, many offices to start opening here that deal with sustainability. Fayetteville will truly become the high tech leader of the region and what better than sustainability. Hopefully this will bring in extremely high paying jobs to the area, similar to Silicon Valley. Although land prices in Fayetteville could also dramatically increase as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Logistics company adds office in Fayetteville for Sustainability Push

Well, as city leaders predicted, it is starting to happen. This is the first of, I believe, many offices to start opening here that deal with sustainability. Fayetteville will truly become the high tech leader of the region and what better than sustainability. Hopefully this will bring in extremely high paying jobs to the area, similar to Silicon Valley. Although land prices in Fayetteville could also dramatically increase as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd forgotten about this topic. But yeah I saw that in the paper this morning as well. I don't think jobs will just drop at our feet, but I think Fayetteville makes a good case for itself. People sometimes don't take all these 'quality of life' rankings that seriously. But it's stuff like that, that really gets some of these companies notice. It's even why P&G has it's offices in Fayetteville rather than Bentonville like so many other companies do with Wal-mart. I things will only get better, but the city also can't just sit back either. It will have to keep working at this for it to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I hope so, and it's definitely a good sign to have someone sign up so soon, but I still wonder if this thing is just a pipe dream. I think the city will have to work real hard to attract the clients to bring offices here if they want to compete with some more suitable locations.

However, the guy in the article had an interesting quote about the people here being so much farther ahead on sustainability and understanding it. I wonder what experiences led him to that conclusion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oh yeah, there are certainly some advantages here. We do have a central location. Also pretty close to I-40 and I-44. The U of A, big businesses in the area like Wal-mart. And the area's growth and often high rankings in a number of categories also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. If his vision and predictions are accurate, this area is in for some interesting things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the 1300 suppliers is the primary motive. I don't know how much it has to do with sustainability. When sustainability means less trucks and less shipments to do the same job...don't know if it is just sustainability being talked about. What really is a draw to the area is supply chain management and transportation logistics which is at the forefront of progress in this area, but might as well say sustainability because it sounds better these days (but the 1300 suppliers mentioned in the "brochure" is likely to appease the stock value of the company because it is relating it to an important business reason).

Either way, it will be better for our area to get more of this kind of stuff, but it won't be as diversified as we want it to be. Sustainability as it applies to large infrastructures of Chicago-sized proportions probably has more reason to be near a big city. However I welcome a focused sustainability center on issues regarding big busineses like Tyson, Wal-mart, and JB Hunt. Mainly for the poultry, retail, and transportation industry sustainability would be a large field of research and we have a large amount of importance within those three industries here. That would be enough I guess to make the sustainability center have a large role with many partners.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Fayetteville is known for having a lot of environmentally-minded folks.

There's also the great business school.

And, then there's Wal-Mart, which pretty much sets the tone globally as far as distribution logistics and supply chain management.

It makes a lot of sense, actually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.