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Arts & Entertainment Venues

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Columbus proper has spent hundreds of millions of public and private dollars in the last decade to update its arts and entertainment venues. A brief rundown of inventory -

RiverCenter is as good as they come, I think.

The Springer is absolutely gorgeous.

The South Commons has a nice arrangement of venues - arena, baseball park, football stadium and softball park.

Liberty Theatre

CSU's downtown theatre

CSU's Lumpkin Center

Human Experience Theatre - didn't that close? Does Columbus have an 'edgier' theatre anymore?

The Columbus Museum got an upgrade.

And the Main Library (it isn't an A&E venue, but it is a cultural investment)

I remember when the Mudcats were once popular and it was at least 'fashionable' to go to a ball game there, if not about the sport itself. Memorial Stadium once hosted the Georgia v. Auburn game a neutral territory. It now hosts Tuskeegee v. Morehouse the same way. RiverCenter brings in the talent, but it wouldn't be so if generous benefactors didn't kick in sponsorship dollars. Of course that's true of most performing arts venues.

What will it take to get more audience and spectators to events? Will it take bigger-name acts? Is it about a perception of safety? Is it too much competition from in-home and other entertainment options? What's next? Columbus area will grow by leaps and bounds in the coming 5 - 10 years. While it's not as pressing as issues like where will the kids go to school, the question still bears asking. Will our recently updated venues be suddenly out dated?

Please leave recreational sports issues like the skateboard park to another topic and leave this one to discuss audience and spectator venues.

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Columbus proper has spent hundreds of millions of public and private dollars in the last decade to update its arts and entertainment venues. A brief rundown of inventory -

RiverCenter is as good as they come, I think.

The Springer is absolutely gorgeous.

The South Commons has a nice arrangement of venues - arena, baseball park, football stadium and softball park.

Liberty Theatre

CSU's downtown theatre

CSU's Lumpkin Center

Human Experience Theatre - didn't that close? Does Columbus have an 'edgier' theatre anymore?

The Columbus Museum got an upgrade.

And the Main Library (it isn't an A&E venue, but it is a cultural investment)

I remember when the Mudcats were once popular and it was at least 'fashionable' to go to a ball game there, if not about the sport itself. Memorial Stadium once hosted the Georgia v. Auburn game a neutral territory. It now hosts Tuskeegee v. Morehouse the same way. RiverCenter brings in the talent, but it wouldn't be so if generous benefactors didn't kick in sponsorship dollars. Of course that's true of most performing arts venues.

What will it take to get more audience and spectators to events? Will it take bigger-name acts? Is it about a perception of safety? Is it too much competition from in-home and other entertainment options? What's next? Columbus area will grow by leaps and bounds in the coming 5 - 10 years. While it's not as pressing as issues like where will the kids go to school, the question still bears asking. Will our recently updated venues be suddenly out dated?

Please leave recreational sports issues like the skateboard park to another topic and leave this one to discuss audience and spectator venues.

KIA will be a huge shot in the arm for local A&E. Korean culture stresses arts -- especially music. That is why I expect that there will be an influx of interest in Schwab School of Music. BRAC will probably affect recreational (baseball/hockey etc) more than A&E. Not sure whether Human Experience Theater still exists. "edgier" theater is probably new CSU tehater @ Corn Ctr. -- think their first season set to begin in a few weeks. Forgot what lineup is -- but as I recall was not "your father's" traditional selection of plays. I have heard that Museum is discussing plans about expansion to connect existing complex with the School Dist Building (across from Hinson Galleries on 13th Ave) which will be vacated when the new building is built on Macon Rd.

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Columbus proper has spent hundreds of millions of public and private dollars in the last decade to update its arts and entertainment venues. A brief rundown of inventory -

RiverCenter is as good as they come, I think.

The Springer is absolutely gorgeous.

The South Commons has a nice arrangement of venues - arena, baseball park, football stadium and softball park.

Liberty Theatre

CSU's downtown theatre

CSU's Lumpkin Center

Human Experience Theatre - didn't that close? Does Columbus have an 'edgier' theatre anymore?

The Columbus Museum got an upgrade.

And the Main Library (it isn't an A&E venue, but it is a cultural investment)

I remember when the Mudcats were once popular and it was at least 'fashionable' to go to a ball game there, if not about the sport itself. Memorial Stadium once hosted the Georgia v. Auburn game a neutral territory. It now hosts Tuskeegee v. Morehouse the same way. RiverCenter brings in the talent, but it wouldn't be so if generous benefactors didn't kick in sponsorship dollars. Of course that's true of most performing arts venues.

What will it take to get more audience and spectators to events? Will it take bigger-name acts? Is it about a perception of safety? Is it too much competition from in-home and other entertainment options? What's next? Columbus area will grow by leaps and bounds in the coming 5 - 10 years. While it's not as pressing as issues like where will the kids go to school, the question still bears asking. Will our recently updated venues be suddenly out dated?

Please leave recreational sports issues like the skateboard park to another topic and leave this one to discuss audience and spectator venues.

KIA will be a huge shot in the arm for local A&E. Korean culture stresses arts -- especially music. That is why I expect that there will be an influx of interest in Schwab School of Music. BRAC will probably affect recreational (baseball/hockey etc) more than A&E. Not sure whether Human Experience Theater still exists. "edgier" theater is probably new CSU tehater @ Corn Ctr. -- think their first season set to begin in a few weeks. Forgot what lineup is -- but as I recall was not "your father's" traditional selection of plays. I have heard that Museum is discussing plans about expansion to connect existing complex with the School Dist Building (across from Hinson Galleries on 13th Ave) which will be vacated when the new building is built on Macon Rd.

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Columbus proper has spent hundreds of millions of public and private dollars in the last decade to update its arts and entertainment venues. A brief rundown of inventory -

RiverCenter is as good as they come, I think.

The Springer is absolutely gorgeous.

The South Commons has a nice arrangement of venues - arena, baseball park, football stadium and softball park.

Liberty Theatre

CSU's downtown theatre

CSU's Lumpkin Center

Human Experience Theatre - didn't that close? Does Columbus have an 'edgier' theatre anymore?

The Columbus Museum got an upgrade.

And the Main Library (it isn't an A&E venue, but it is a cultural investment)

I remember when the Mudcats were once popular and it was at least 'fashionable' to go to a ball game there, if not about the sport itself. Memorial Stadium once hosted the Georgia v. Auburn game a neutral territory. It now hosts Tuskeegee v. Morehouse the same way. RiverCenter brings in the talent, but it wouldn't be so if generous benefactors didn't kick in sponsorship dollars. Of course that's true of most performing arts venues.

What will it take to get more audience and spectators to events? Will it take bigger-name acts? Is it about a perception of safety? Is it too much competition from in-home and other entertainment options? What's next? Columbus area will grow by leaps and bounds in the coming 5 - 10 years. While it's not as pressing as issues like where will the kids go to school, the question still bears asking. Will our recently updated venues be suddenly out dated?

Please leave recreational sports issues like the skateboard park to another topic and leave this one to discuss audience and spectator venues.

KIA will be a huge shot in the arm for local A&E. Korean culture stresses arts -- especially music. That is why I expect that there will be an influx of interest in Schwab School of Music. BRAC will probably affect recreational (baseball/hockey etc) more than A&E. Not sure whether Human Experience Theater still exists. "edgier" theater is probably new CSU tehater @ Corn Ctr. -- think their first season set to begin in a few weeks. Forgot what lineup is -- but as I recall was not "your father's" traditional selection of plays. I have heard that Museum is discussing plans about expansion to connect existing complex with the School Dist Building (across from Hinson Galleries on 13th Ave) which will be vacated when the new building is built on Macon Rd.

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Columbus proper has spent hundreds of millions of public and private dollars in the last decade to update its arts and entertainment venues. A brief rundown of inventory -

RiverCenter is as good as they come, I think.

The Springer is absolutely gorgeous.

The South Commons has a nice arrangement of venues - arena, baseball park, football stadium and softball park.

Liberty Theatre

CSU's downtown theatre

CSU's Lumpkin Center

Human Experience Theatre - didn't that close? Does Columbus have an 'edgier' theatre anymore?

The Columbus Museum got an upgrade.

And the Main Library (it isn't an A&E venue, but it is a cultural investment)

I remember when the Mudcats were once popular and it was at least 'fashionable' to go to a ball game there, if not about the sport itself. Memorial Stadium once hosted the Georgia v. Auburn game a neutral territory. It now hosts Tuskeegee v. Morehouse the same way. RiverCenter brings in the talent, but it wouldn't be so if generous benefactors didn't kick in sponsorship dollars. Of course that's true of most performing arts venues.

What will it take to get more audience and spectators to events? Will it take bigger-name acts? Is it about a perception of safety? Is it too much competition from in-home and other entertainment options? What's next? Columbus area will grow by leaps and bounds in the coming 5 - 10 years. While it's not as pressing as issues like where will the kids go to school, the question still bears asking. Will our recently updated venues be suddenly out dated?

Please leave recreational sports issues like the skateboard park to another topic and leave this one to discuss audience and spectator venues.

KIA will be a huge shot in the arm for local A&E. Korean culture stresses arts -- especially music. That is why I expect that there will be an influx of interest in Schwab School of Music. BRAC will probably affect recreational (baseball/hockey etc) more than A&E. Not sure whether Human Experience Theater still exists. "edgier" theater is probably new CSU tehater @ Corn Ctr. -- think their first season set to begin in a few weeks. Forgot what lineup is -- but as I recall was not "your father's" traditional selection of plays. I have heard that Museum is discussing plans about expansion to connect existing complex with the School Dist Building (across from Hinson Galleries on 13th Ave) which will be vacated when the new building is built on Macon Rd.

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The Civic Center is nice, but it was built too small to attract really big names. With just 8,000 seats (I know they advertise 10,000, but they have to 'kill' about 2,000 seats next to the stage in a concert), the numberss just don't work out for a big name act. Say an act expects to bring in $500,000 for a concert, that would put the ticket price for every single ticket over $60. That would mean either the ticket prices couldn't be scaled (some higher or some lower). The public would have a fit if it cost $120 for date night or $240 for a family of 4. With the market numbers that ALTman1 shows, a major concert would be able to draw say, an 18,000 audience.

I wouldn't be opposed to adding another penny to the next splost to increase the size. Maybe Aflac would do some sort of funds matching if we called it Aflac Arena and put a giant duck on top...

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How about an Amphitheatre. Those are more economical ways to get a lot of people gathered for a concert

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The Civic Center is nice, but it was built too small to attract really big names. With just 8,000 seats (I know they advertise 10,000, but they have to 'kill' about 2,000 seats next to the stage in a concert), the numberss just don't work out for a big name act. Say an act expects to bring in $500,000 for a concert, that would put the ticket price for every single ticket over $60. That would mean either the ticket prices couldn't be scaled (some higher or some lower). The public would have a fit if it cost $120 for date night or $240 for a family of 4. With the market numbers that ALTman1 shows, a major concert would be able to draw say, an 18,000 audience.

I wouldn't be opposed to adding another penny to the next splost to increase the size. Maybe Aflac would do some sort of funds matching if we called it Aflac Arena and put a giant duck on top...

I think at one time Aflac considered purchasing naming rights to the Civic Center, but it never happened for some reason. I have been to concerts there before when there was about 10,000. It is packed, but it is a lot of fun. The Civic Center has been lucky to get some big acts, but I would like to see more.

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How about an Amphitheatre. Those are more economical ways to get a lot of people gathered for a concert

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An amphitheater would be great. The Grove development area would be an excellent place for it. Of course, it all depends on the size. Harris County or U.S. 280 between Columbus and Auburn/Opelika would be an ideal area for a venue. Auburn students would welcome large concerts.

US 280 venue makes sense. Where alot of BRAC folks will be located, plus Auburn students and close enough to draw CSU crowds and folks from the Georgia side. Would further tie Lee County into the metro possibly leading to C/A/O MSA designation.

Even proposing Harris County as venue would give the folks there apoplexy. A possible alternative is Flat Rock Park. It would require alot of infrastructure and work but it has potential to be facility similar to Red Rocks in Colorado. It is really an underutilized, under appreciated resource. making it into an amphitheater and stop on the proposed trolley line would be an idea worth considering.

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US 280 venue makes sense. Where alot of BRAC folks will be located, plus Auburn students and close enough to draw CSU crowds and folks from the Georgia side. Would further tie Lee County into the metro possibly leading to C/A/O MSA designation.

Even proposing Harris County as venue would give the folks there apoplexy. A possible alternative is Flat Rock Park. It would require alot of infrastructure and work but it has potential to be facility similar to Red Rocks in Colorado. It is really an underutilized, under appreciated resource. making it into an amphitheater and stop on the proposed trolley line would be an idea worth considering.

Flat Rock - Another really good idea.

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Columbus State University is growing. Let's face it, in the south, a university has to have a football program to get beyond a certain level. Has CSU reached that tipping point? Will it ever be able to support Football? Studies have said to cost outway the benefit. Would it help to host exhibition games at Memorial Stadium - maybe UT Chatt and GA Southern? The stadium was once the home of the Georgia-Auburn rivalry. It still hosts two contests from predominantly black colleges - the Fountain City Classic and the Tuskeegee-Morehouse contest. Columbus is clearly a football town, but with divided allegiances to mostly Auburn, Georgia and Alabama. Cougars Football anyone? header%2005.jpg

SC_MS00t.jpg

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Columbus State University is growing. Let's face it, in the south, a university has to have a football program to get beyond a certain level. Has CSU reached that tipping point? Will it ever be able to support Football? Studies have said to cost outway the benefit. Would it help to host exhibition games at Memorial Stadium - maybe UT Chatt and GA Southern? The stadium was once the home of the Georgia-Auburn rivalry. It still hosts two contests from predominantly black colleges - the Fountain City Classic and the Tuskeegee-Morehouse contest. Columbus is clearly a football town, but with divided allegiances to mostly Auburn, Georgia and Alabama. Cougars Football anyone? header%2005.jpg

SC_MS00t.jpg

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A banner idea! CSU now has enough alumni to support a team with butts-in-the seats and, if the recent fund drive is any indication, they are inclined to open their checkbooks and give financial support.

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As a student, we would love a football team but I don't see it happening in the coming years just because I don't think they're looking to add anymore sports. They've had great success with their golf, softball, and baseball programs.

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As a student, we would love a football team but I don't see it happening in the coming years just because I don't think they're looking to add anymore sports. They've had great success with their golf, softball, and baseball programs.

I'm sure you're right. Unfortunately, these teams are successful insofar as they've won conference, regional and even national titles. But they don't have the cache that football has and they don't attract student populations or endear loyalty the way football teams do, even at the bigger schools.

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Columbus State University is growing. Let's face it, in the south, a university has to have a football program to get beyond a certain level. Has CSU reached that tipping point? Will it ever be able to support Football? Studies have said to cost outway the benefit. Would it help to host exhibition games at Memorial Stadium - maybe UT Chatt and GA Southern? The stadium was once the home of the Georgia-Auburn rivalry. It still hosts two contests from predominantly black colleges - the Fountain City Classic and the Tuskeegee-Morehouse contest. Columbus is clearly a football town, but with divided allegiances to mostly Auburn, Georgia and Alabama. Cougars Football anyone?

Georgia State has just committed to starting a football program to compete at the Div I-FCS (I-AA) level. They have talked about it for a while, did a feasibility study, an alumni survey and decided the benefits were worth the effort. They are situated in a far more competitive location than Columbus State, with not only GATech just a mile away, but substantial alumni connections to not only UGA, Auburn and Alabama, but Clemson, South Carolina, as well as all four major league sports (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL).

Also, remember there are some non-obvious costs to bear with adding football; GSU is funding additional women's sports (for Title IX) and a new marching band to go with football.

That being said, it's interesting that Alabama with only half the population of Georgia supports 4 DI-A football programs (Auburn, Alabama, UAB, Troy) while Georgia only has two (UGA and GATech). The states have about the same number of lower division programs (North Alabama, Jacksonville St., Tuskegee, Al. State, Al. A&M for Alabama; GA Southern, Valdosta St. W. Georgia, Clark-Atlanta and soon GSU for Georgia).

It seems that Georgia could certainly support another program (in addition to GSU), and Columbus would be a good market (less competitive than ATL) to add one in.

Here's a link to GSU's football page where there are links to various articles, updates, etc. and here's a link directly to the feasibility study.

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As a student, we would love a football team but I don't see it happening in the coming years just because I don't think they're looking to add anymore sports. They've had great success with their golf, softball, and baseball programs.

I must totally agree with you on the fact that we students would love to see a football program. The university knows that students and community would support it just look at how packed the basketball & baseball games are. Right now though the university is too devoted to building up the downtown campus so all their money is going there. The city of Columbus should see that college football is needed in this city it would benifit local businesses greatly. Just look at the Tuskegee-Morehouse football game in October brings in close to 35,000 people and the Fountain CIty classic in November this years numbers suggest there may have been up to 50,000 people in Columbus for that game. I believe it I was stuck in the traffic on veterans for over a hour.

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I must totally agree with you on the fact that we students would love to see a football program. The university knows that students and community would support it just look at how packed the basketball & baseball games are. Right now though the university is too devoted to building up the downtown campus so all their money is going there. The city of Columbus should see that college football is needed in this city it would benifit local businesses greatly. Just look at the Tuskegee-Morehouse football game in October brings in close to 35,000 people and the Fountain CIty classic in November this years numbers suggest there may have been up to 50,000 people in Columbus for that game. I believe it I was stuck in the traffic on veterans for over a hour.

If the students really want it, start a movement; lobby the administration to start a program. Though I don't think they ever got that organized at GSU, part of the reason it is happening is that students (and prospective students) kept asking the president about when they'd have football. Also, if you do lobby, be prepared to step up to the plate with increased student fees to help fund it (something that was key to the GSU commitment).

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I think at one time Aflac considered purchasing naming rights to the Civic Center, but it never happened for some reason. I have been to concerts there before when there was about 10,000. It is packed, but it is a lot of fun. The Civic Center has been lucky to get some big acts, but I would like to see more.

The Civic Center can't hold more than 8,500 for a concert. It advertises 10,000 seats within the industry, but after it 'kills' seats on the sides and behind stages, ant behind the sound board for the 'end stage' set-up, the one with the stage under the hospitality suites. The most it can seat for a concert is the 'in the round' set-up, but few concerts are staged that way. Due to its seating potential, the Civic Center promoters consider it a high 'C' to mid 'B'. Other factors are proximity to Atlanta (too close) and market density (too wide).

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Georgia State has just committed to starting a football program to compete at the Div I-FCS (I-AA) level. They have talked about it for a while, did a feasibility study, an alumni survey and decided the benefits were worth the effort. They are situated in a far more competitive location than Columbus State, with not only GATech just a mile away, but substantial alumni connections to not only UGA, Auburn and Alabama, but Clemson, South Carolina, as well as all four major league sports (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL).

Also, remember there are some non-obvious costs to bear with adding football; GSU is funding additional women's sports (for Title IX) and a new marching band to go with football.

That being said, it's interesting that Alabama with only half the population of Georgia supports 4 DI-A football programs (Auburn, Alabama, UAB, Troy) while Georgia only has two (UGA and GATech). The states have about the same number of lower division programs (North Alabama, Jacksonville St., Tuskegee, Al. State, Al. A&M for Alabama; GA Southern, Valdosta St. W. Georgia, Clark-Atlanta and soon GSU for Georgia).

It seems that Georgia could certainly support another program (in addition to GSU), and Columbus would be a good market (less competitive than ATL) to add one in.

Here's a link to GSU's football page where there are links to various articles, updates, etc. and here's a link directly to the feasibility study.

Good info and perspective. Thanks. I have wondered why UGA didn't have an in-state SEC rival while some other lower-pop states do. I would support annexing Auburn into Georgia, though.

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Good info and perspective. Thanks. I have wondered why UGA didn't have an in-state SEC rival while some other lower-pop states do. I would support annexing Auburn into Georgia, though.

LOL - so would a lot of us Auburn grads!! But seriously, out of the states in the South, Georgia has the worst ratio of D1-A football to population; which is a bit strange.

War Damn Eagle!

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A new president is an opporunity to really allow CSU to mature at it's 50th. It needs, in my opinion, some dorms to provide more dense student resident housing on campus and a football program. Spartan in another community found this map of D1A football programs...

HelmMap.gif

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Columbus proper has spent hundreds of millions of public and private dollars in the last decade to update its arts and entertainment venues. A brief rundown of inventory -

RiverCenter is as good as they come, I think.

The Springer is absolutely gorgeous.

The South Commons has a nice arrangement of venues - arena, baseball park, football stadium and softball park.

Liberty Theatre

CSU's downtown theatre

CSU's Lumpkin Center

Human Experience Theatre - didn't that close? Does Columbus have an 'edgier' theatre anymore?

The Columbus Museum got an upgrade.

And the Main Library (it isn't an A&E venue, but it is a cultural investment)

I remember when the Mudcats were once popular and it was at least 'fashionable' to go to a ball game there, if not about the sport itself. Memorial Stadium once hosted the Georgia v. Auburn game a neutral territory. It now hosts Tuskeegee v. Morehouse the same way. RiverCenter brings in the talent, but it wouldn't be so if generous benefactors didn't kick in sponsorship dollars. Of course that's true of most performing arts venues.

What will it take to get more audience and spectators to events? Will it take bigger-name acts? Is it about a perception of safety? Is it too much competition from in-home and other entertainment options? What's next? Columbus area will grow by leaps and bounds in the coming 5 - 10 years. While it's not as pressing as issues like where will the kids go to school, the question still bears asking. Will our recently updated venues be suddenly out dated?

Please leave recreational sports issues like the skateboard park to another topic and leave this one to discuss audience and spectator venues.

Well... I believe the reason why people aren't really attending any of the events in town is because many of the venues aren't marketed well and are far beyond the price range that most people are willing to spend around here. Take Atlanta as a positive example of entertainment that draws in CROWDS of people from the entire Southern Region. I don't need money to go to the Jazz Concerts in the Park, the Dogwood Festival, Pride (although not many people down here are THAT culturally open), and a whole plethora of other forms of entertainment that I can't think of. In Columbus, the rich people call the shots. So that's the reason why everything that lands in Columbus is either Monkey Joes lame, or it's another pricy venue that will only draw the interests of people who are willing to pay the price.

I know that in Columbus, safety is a big concern. But what I think deters many people from coming (I'm talking about big name artists) is the limitations and regulations that Columbus overwhelms performers with as to what they are allowed to sing, say, how loud they can be, all of this mess... so they don't come. So people don't come. If Columbus wants to be bigger and better in the eyes of the nation, it is going to have to make some big sacrifices and bend a little to a diverse audience.

And as far as the citizens are concerned along with the developers, Columbus doesn't WANT to be cosmopolitan or more importantly build in consideration to the natural environment. Cosmopolitan lifestyles are URBAN lifestyles. And Columbus is far too SUBURBAN.

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Well... I believe the reason why people aren't really attending any of the events in town is because many of the venues aren't marketed well and are far beyond the price range that most people are willing to spend around here. Take Atlanta as a positive example of entertainment that draws in CROWDS of people from the entire Southern Region. I don't need money to go to the Jazz Concerts in the Park, the Dogwood Festival, Pride (although not many people down here are THAT culturally open), and a whole plethora of other forms of entertainment that I can't think of. In Columbus, the rich people call the shots. So that's the reason why everything that lands in Columbus is either Monkey Joes lame, or it's another pricy venue that will only draw the interests of people who are willing to pay the price.

I know that in Columbus, safety is a big concern. But what I think deters many people from coming (I'm talking about big name artists) is the limitations and regulations that Columbus overwhelms performers with as to what they are allowed to sing, say, how loud they can be, all of this mess... so they don't come. So people don't come. If Columbus wants to be bigger and better in the eyes of the nation, it is going to have to make some big sacrifices and bend a little to a diverse audience.

And as far as the citizens are concerned along with the developers, Columbus doesn't WANT to be cosmopolitan or more importantly build in consideration to the natural environment. Cosmopolitan lifestyles are URBAN lifestyles. And Columbus is far too SUBURBAN.

I think Columbus does very well to attract large acts compared to cities like Augusta, Macon, and Savannah. Columbus is starting to grow up and develop itself to be more cosmopolitan. Just look at what downtown has become. The RiverCenter, Springer, and CSU have put Columbus on the map compared to other 2nd tier southern cities. You will see more urban development because Columbus has very little land left to develop in the city. As a developer myself, Columbus is poised for great projects. Just look at the new PUD's that are going up in north Columbus. The one behind Columbus Park, one by Northside High, and The Grove in Harris County are all New Urbanism type developments that will lead the way for Columbus's growth for years to come.

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I think Columbus does very well to attract large acts compared to cities like Augusta, Macon, and Savannah. Columbus is starting to grow up and develop itself to be more cosmopolitan. Just look at what downtown has become. The RiverCenter, Springer, and CSU have put Columbus on the map compared to other 2nd tier southern cities. You will see more urban development because Columbus has very little land left to develop in the city. As a developer myself, Columbus is poised for great projects. Just look at the new PUD's that are going up in north Columbus. The one behind Columbus Park, one by Northside High, and The Grove in Harris County are all New Urbanism type developments that will lead the way for Columbus's growth for years to come.

These will be quality developments because Woodruff is doing them, but they're hardley examples of new urbanism. The description of the one by the Crossing sounds like every other apartment development and every other mini-retail development. The same for the one on Beaver Run Rd. As for The Grove - about the 5th "Grove" in the metro area by the way - It's just a collection of typical suburban developments. Different housing types, an apartment development and maybe some retail. The retail remains to be seen since Harris has backwards zoning with 2-acre minimums. And lastly these are all occuring where - in the suburbs... A new urbanism development would be a mid-rise verticle residential development in mid-town or the medical district with lower level retail and offices.

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