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Charlotteman

Mother Teresa really an atheist?

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A facinating new book about Mother Teresa of Culcutta has caused somewhat of a stir. The book is essentially a collection of letters written by the famous nun, and edited by the man who most wants to make her a saint.

Turns out she was a dark depressed figure, tormented by her apparent lack of connection to the very religious beliefs held by christianity. She reportedly experienced a mystic vision at a young age, but the visions never recurred. Her despondancy and doubt increased over the years, and she began to question the very existence of god----all the while going about the daily life of an internationally famous religious figure. While accepting the Nobel Prize, she was essentially wearing a mask (her smile) to cover her inner torment of religious disconnection.

Was she in essence an atheist trying her best to be thought of as a believer? Will be interesting to hear thoughts of UPers.

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Personally, I think that any questions or doubts raised against Teresa on a personal level is now beside the point as the good she has done is undeniable.

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One's works expresses one's faith. I highly doubt she could have continued her ministry had she lost all faith.

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I don't know all of her details, but it seems that most every major religious figure went through some sort of crisis of faith at some point in their life.

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One's works expresses one's faith. I highly doubt she could have continued her ministry had she lost all faith.

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I also believe that great acts of charity and kindness can derive from all people whether they profess religious faith or not. Mother Teresa was a religious figure though and I was not that surprised or dissapointed with this revelation. Iconic religious figures throughout history have gone through bouts of disillusionment concerning whether god exists. Mother Teresa spent her life amongst some of the most wretched poverty and human suffering on this planet. It would only be human to have doubts. This information will have no bearing on her eventually being declared a saint by The Catholic Church.

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^^^Isn't it hilarious that man gets to decide who is a "saint"! Maybe I had better start looking in the clouds more..look at street signs more carefully....and I might see Teresa!!!! Usually "saints" are seen in similar circumstances by kids, and the catholic church buys it hook line and sinker. Since I'm over 50, surely they'll believe me when I say I saw her on a street sign....hehehheh

Oddly enough I wasn't a bit surprised when I heard these revelations about Mother Teresa. As an atheist, I usually expect people with even average intelligence to be able to see beyond religion's flimsy existence. Since I knew Teresa was obviously a very smart woman, why would I be surprised that she was, in essence, an atheist? As another poster has mentioned, atheists are among the most caring, loving, humanitarian of all people.

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Based on the information, I don

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I know several atheists who do more in my community than many of the Christians or Jews I know. One of my best friends is an atheist and is one of the kindest, most giving, and thoughtful people I've ever known. His deeds speak volumes about what it really means to care about humanity. Meanwhile, so-called "people of faith" scream and insult those attending a gay pride parade. Energy that could be better spent clothing the naked, feeding the hungry, and housing the homeless.

I don't really care what Mother Theresa's religious ideology was. She was a great human being who did extraorinary things. That's really all that matters.

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The subject here is Mother Teresa questioning her faith; that's why we're talking about it.

Right, because obviously, smart people can't believe in God.

Your arrogance is really getting old.

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I'm not exactly sure how any of that was relevant to what I said. It is logically fallacious to assume that because I've argued that Mother Teresa's humanitarian works were an outgrowth of her religious faith that every person's good/charitable/selfless deeds must also be the result of religious faith. And it should be obvious that I was speaking within a Christian theological framework; after all, Mother Teresa was a Christian.

And how in the world can you broadbrush people of faith (Christians) based on a statistically insignificant amount protesting a gay rally? Do you think those folks constituted even 1% of professing Christians in Mecklenburg County alone? C'mon dude...

The subject here is Mother Teresa questioning her faith; that's why we're talking about it.

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......

And how in the world can you broadbrush people of faith (Christians) based on a statistically insignificant amount protesting a gay rally? Do you think those folks constituted even 1% of professing Christians in Mecklenburg County alone? C'mon dude........

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Because the Catholic church does not believe in artificial birth control, the only other method is abstenance. An unrealistic solution and one that any sane person, simply would have a hard time supporting where children are starving from the lack of food.

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You said that one's works express one's faith. I simply stated that one needs not faith to do good works. Where's the fallacy in that?

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I note that most of the professing Christians in Mecklenburg are Protestant who got their start from Protesting the actions of the Catholic church which Mother Teresa belongs. Many evangelicals, especially of the type found in the South, consider the Catholic church to be no better than a cult. So in the context that you used it, "christian" is about as a big broadbrush as you can get.

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You are absolutely right. That was an ugly thing for me to have said. Please accept my apologies.

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Although I believe in birth control, I don't think it's valid to call absitence an 'unrealistic soultion.' It is proven to work. Works better than all other forms of birth control, in fact.

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Sure not having sex means no babies. It's unrealistic to believe that this is an effective method of birth control because people are going to have sex.

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Plus, saying, "people are going to have sex," implies that they have no control over themselves, at least no more so than animals.

......

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Plus, saying, "people are going to have sex," implies that they have no control over themselves, at least no more so than animals.

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^^^Actually I am quite embarrassed of my post questioning the intellect of believers. It was an awful thing for me to say and I hope all UP believers can forgive me.

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You're a class act, Charlotteman. I accept your apology.

You can question, shoot, even believe some stuff you were taught is just plain wrong, and still believe in a higher being.

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You can question, shoot, even believe some stuff you were taught is just plain wrong, and still believe in a higher being.

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