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Jones_

"Severe" Drought

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The drought is much much worse than people realize. I receive updates as a WQ supervisor even though my area does not deal with water supply.

An excerpt from the latest Memo:

Neuse River - Falls of the Neuse Reservoir

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The City of Rocky Mount water supply is predicted to fail by mid October...they are pumping in quarry water and borrowing from neighboring cities. So naturally a benefit of dense urban living is no lawns which have a large role to play in the current crisis. Once again the suburban model is failing us....

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Raleigh sells to much water to neighboring towns also. You have Knightdale, Rolesville, Garner, Zebulon, Wendell, parts of Johnston County and especially Wake Forest (Big Homes with big laws) snatching up the water also. Sometimes it dosent pay to be BIG Brother. I forsee a pattern shift in the Weather though.

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There was an artical in the Charlotte paper last Thursday about a Wake Forest Homeower's Asso. demanding that all homeowners have a green yard.

Amid record drought and heat that have pushed cities across the state to severe water conservation measures, residents of the Margot's Pond community outside Raleigh have been ordered by their homeowners association to keep the grass green.

http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archiv...&p_docnum=1

I think the HOA should be taken to task over this.

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In the six years I've owned my house, I've only watered for a few days (if that) after reseeding/overseeding. I try to schedule seeding to preceed a signficiant rain event and have been able to not water some years. My yard doesn't look good, but I hope it shows I care more about conserving drinking water than having a green lawn.

My wife doesn't like it, but we've held to watering the few plants we have to the current twice a week 6-10 schedule. With the They are barely surviving, but we don't think the plants are more important than everyone else.

I think the city of Raleigh can place everyone who buys its water under its restrictions, but enforcement is another issue. I don't know if the airport has their own water source, but they were watering the grass (and roads) when we went to pick a friend up last night.

I understand neighborhoods wanting to maintain a nice look, but to push their agenda of green lawns over water conservation is crazy. But being in Wake Forest, I'm sure they have a waiting list of people trying to buy in to that "community".

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There was an artical in the Charlotte paper last Thursday about a Wake Forest Homeower's Asso. demanding that all homeowners have a green yard.

Amid record drought and heat that have pushed cities across the state to severe water conservation measures, residents of the Margot's Pond community outside Raleigh have been ordered by their homeowners association to keep the grass green.

http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archiv...&p_docnum=1

I think the HOA should be taken to task over this.

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Indeed. I stayed at a motel in Lillington this weekend and was ankle-deep in water by the time my short shower was over. It amazes me that noone requires low-flow shower heads around here, especially in hotel/motel construction.

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EVen though I shouldn't be by now, I'm shocked to hear how much control HOAs have over people's lives. Seig heil!!! This is a ridiculous action even without severe drought.

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One nice thing I've noticed about the drought is that it's killing a lot of kudzu. Kudzu is successful here because of the wet climate. Not so much now!

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^ I doubt it's downright killing it, as kudzu, like ivy and wisteria, develops extensive underground root systems. It's probably just wilting and losing leaves...much like some of my trees are even doing. The drought may have slowed their spread some...but that's probably about it.

If there's any real noticeable benefit from the drought, I'd say it's that there's not been enough moisture for much mosquito egg-laying. It almost makes up for the lack of a good freeze this past winter, to kill them off some. Enjoy it while it lasts I guess.

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One problem we will see in the future is our trees. This dry weather will weaken them and they will come down in a moderate wind. This has happen in Charlotte over the passed few years of dryer weather.

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We drove through Brier Creek last Saturday and were impressed that they were *not* watering to maintain their yards.

Maybe they want to save the water for the golf course and swimming pools -- I counted four pools in various apartment/townhouse/condo complexes other than the ones near the clubhouse.

WRAL reported that Durham would be out of water on December 1st if current usage continued and significant rain didn't come their way. There was a light sprinkling this morning, but I doubt that contributed anything to the water supply.

It would be nice if the disturbance going through Florida would head this way like the Humberto remnants did, but it doesn't look good.

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WRAL reported that Durham would be out of water on December 1st if current usage continued and significant rain didn't come their way.

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As of June Falls Lake was full and I assume Lake Michie and Little River were as well. Winter is usually dry....if we enter next June at 50% full (conservation pool is at 48% now) and we get a second year like this year the situation will be quite serious...I believe it would equal droughts during the great depression...I don't think government is even prepared for the "what if" scenario when it comes to water supply. I agree Rob...at 50% conservation pool and maximum daily peaks reaching over 90 % of EM Johnson's capacity this summer(meaning the city has the population to draw water out as fast if possible) all yard watering should be banned at this point with potable water. Gotta pond or well? go for it, otherwise its a misdemeanor. Looking forward the situation is quite serious...more so than is being let on....

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We need a couple big tropical storms to come in and set the water table back to normal. We haven't gotten those though. The mid-atlantic has just been too hurricane poor lately.

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State government is scrambling to deal with this in a coordinated manner. This email is public record.

An update based on last Friday's meeting and several discussions today:

John Spurrell with the N.C. League of Municipalities is contacting each of the Tier I towns to determine what kind of assistance they need and reporting back to Division of Water Resources.

**Siler City has the most immediate problems; there are two chicken-packing plants in Siler City that require large amounts of process water. Siler City is currently releasing the minimum amount of water from their reservoir. Reservoir levels are now -12 feet; if levels drop to -15 feet, Siler City will not be able to supply those industries. Raw water is being trucked from Jordan Lake to Siler City's reservoir to supplement the existing water supply and Siler City is exploring the possibility of emergency interconnections with other systems (such as Chatham County). Hobbs and Upchurch (engineering firm) is working with the city to identify options. Today, Siler City went to stage 3 water restrictions, prohibiting all outdoor water use except for fire response and requiring all water users to reduce consumption by 50%.

There will be a meeting at the League of Municipalities on Thursday morning at 10:00 (Coates Center) to talk about funding to meet local government infrastructure needs (such as interconnection).

On Thursday, there is also a meeting of the Catawba River Basin drought management group to discuss the next level of water conservation measures there under the Catawba River low inflow protocol.

DENR is working with the League to set up three regional meetings (proposed locations are Raleigh, Greensboro and Asheville) with local governments, water system operators and industry about drought response. The goal is to have specific dates set by COB Wednesday. These meetings will likely be targeted to the Tier II areas in an effort to help those water systems avoid a crisis. MCIC has been asked to participate.

Gary Hunt has talked to Gene Byrd at Department of Commerce. Gary has proposed that Commerce make initial contact with major industries (in the Tier I communities first); Commerce would then refer industries that need assistance with water conservation efforts to DPPEA. Waste Reduction Partners will be able to provide some of that technical assistance in the western part of the state; DPPEA will respond in other areas.

Div. of Water Resources will get information on use of special water rate structures for conservation purposes from Jeff Hughes at the School of Government. DENR will then make information on adoption of special rate structures available to communities in drought areas. High Point had just adopted a drought rate structure that charges higher rates for usage in excess of base levels for different types of water customers.

In a few locations, private water supply wells have run dry as a result of groundwater depletion; need to determine need for funds and possible funding sources to assist with replacement wells or connection to a water system. The Rural Center apparently has some low interest loan funds that can be used to connect a to a water system (question whether this funding can be used to install a new deep well on the property). Dept. of Agriculture has funding that can be used to replace a farm well.

In the D3 and D4 drought areas, need to encourage local governments and the general public to limit outdoor water use (lawn watering, for example) to conserve water supplies for essential uses. The default water conservation standards in the EMC rules and most local government ordinances allow outdoor water use to some degree even in exceptional drought. Only a very small number of communities have completely prohibited lawn watering.

For longer term benefits, encourage industries to institute water reuse. Not an immediate solution, because it will involve both infrastructure and permit modifications -- but it may allow some industries to get in a better position to withstand water shortages next spring and summer if we have a dry winter as predicted. Kim Colson is the contact in DWQ.

Robin

The economic impact of this drought could be staggering. One municipality is trucking in water. You could see water infrastructure costs increase many times over in order to meet the needs of our booming population.

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I don't use a lot of water but what I do is I don't run the water while I brush my teeth. I turn it off instead of letting it run. That is my little bit I can offer.

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The Governor is supposed to make a major announcement onthe drought today at 1pm. It may not come today, but we are inching towards a state of emergency and statewide mandatory restrictions...

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Well, the growing season is just about over, which means Et will be greatly reduced (evapotranspiration, primarily from trees, not the extraterrestrial). Hopefully that will help, as rains will bring more bang for the buck when it comes to replenishing Falls Lake.

[edit: needless to say, if ANYONE is watering his lawn these days, shame on you.]

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[edit: needless to say, if ANYONE is watering his lawn these days, shame on you.]

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The subdivision across from mine was watering their landscaping this morning near the road, with half the water landing on the sidewalk and road <_<

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It's astounding how quickly we've fallen in to this situation (things were not bad as of spring if I recall). I guess that's what record heat and no rain for months will do. Does anyone see this as something that would prevent corporate relocations and the like moving forward? Are there plans to increase the drinking water supply in the region considering the the tremendous growth? A drought like this seems like it could happen at any time and we just look woefully unprepared. I recall hearing Mitch Silver talking about a new reservoir north of Raleigh---northeast of Raleigh perhaps.

Watering lawns at this point should be banned and is completely irresponsible and unacceptable. :angry:

I've not washed my car in a couple months, and I turn the water off when a I brush my teeth. Also using less water in the shower and using less of the dishwasher lately.

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It's astounding how quickly we've fallen in to this situation (things were not bad as of spring if I recall). I guess that's what record heat and no rain for months will do. Does anyone see this as something that would prevent corporate relocations and the like moving forward? Are there plans to increase the drinking water supply in the region considering the the tremendous growth? A drought like this seems like it could happen at any time and we just look woefully unprepared. I recall hearing Mitch Silver talking about a new reservoir north of Raleigh---northeast of Raleigh perhaps.

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