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jds5b

Does Nashville hate trees?

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One of the sad aspects of the clearing of the pocket park across from the downtown library was the loss of several old growth shade trees from the downtown area. I know that birds were causing a health problem, but surely there were ways of dealing with this besides removing the trees.

This incident has made me think about our city's treatment of established trees. The grant to NES of widespread authority to (often carelessly) top trees on private property is another very visible example of the low value we appear to assign to trees in town. In contrast, some other cities have tree ordinances where you need special permission to cut down a tree on your own property.

I'd be curious to hear other people's take on this, and whether there are organizations in Nashville that work to protect urban trees.

I should add that I'm not qualified to make any argument on the scientific/environmental benefit of trees. I just think that they add aesthetic value to an urban area and are really nice to walk under in August.

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I agree. It isn't as if trees are out of place or uncommon in urban areas either. The solution they've come up with to combat these so-called health issues is akin to sawing off your own foot after contracting athlete's foot. It just doesn't make sense.

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Last week on my way to the ben harper concert at the ryman I walked past the presbyterian church at church st. and 5th ave. Not sure if everybody is familiar with it, but there is a row of trees gracing the side of the church along 5th. To my bewilderment there were hundreds of blackbirds congregating in its limbs causing quite a ruckus. To go along with nashville's de-foliaging, I am proposing those trees be cut down too. If they can't because it is not city property, I would like to encourage the city to use eminent domain and tear down the church too because church's also attract our inhumane flying friend.

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Last week on my way to the ben harper concert at the ryman I walked past the presbyterian church at church st. and 5th ave. Not sure if everybody is familiar with it, but there is a row of trees gracing the side of the church along 5th. To my bewilderment there were hundreds of blackbirds congregating in its limbs causing quite a ruckus. To go along with nashville's de-foliaging, I am proposing those trees be cut down too. If they can't because it is not city property, I would like to encourage the city to use eminent domain and tear down the church too because church's also attract our inhumane flying friend.

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was this post serious or an attempt at humor? no offense, but that is a horrific idea. tear down downtown presbyterian church?

get to know this historic building before you decide it should be torn down. That church should never be allowed to be torn down. Ever. It is one of the things I am proud of about Nashville.

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Sorry guys, my post was a poor attempt at humor. I took a supposed city problem and over exaggerated a potential means to stop it.

To be honest I think the reasoning behind the city tearing down the trees at the church street park is a hoax. The city blamed it on the birds when they didn't want to admit the real reason was all the homeless people. How would it look in the national media if nashville tore down all the shade trees in a city park so the homeless people would stop congregating there. Not the type of spotlight the city would be hoping for.

I will admit this is one of the only cities in america that they could get away with this kind of stuff. Elsewhere, there would be lawsuits against the city by almost every different interest group known to man, especially if it happened in california.

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was this post serious or an attempt at humor? no offense, but that is a horrific idea. tear down downtown presbyterian church?

get to know this historic building before you decide it should be torn down. That church should never be allowed to be torn down. Ever. It is one of the things I am proud of about Nashville.

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Sorry guys, my post was a poor attempt at humor. I took a supposed city problem and over exaggerated a potential means to stop it.

To be honest I think the reasoning behind the city tearing down the trees at the church street park is a hoax. The city blamed it on the birds when they didn't want to admit the real reason was all the homeless people. How would it look in the national media if nashville tore down all the shade trees in a city park so the homeless people would stop congregating there. Not the type of spotlight the city would be hoping for.

I will admit this is one of the only cities in america that they could get away with this kind of stuff. Elsewhere, there would be lawsuits against the city by almost every different interest group known to man, especially if it happened in california.

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Spent some time in the Hall of Fame park tonight... and this one as well, at least tonight, had a crapload (no pun intended :P) of birds flying back and forth between the groups of trees... like, probably a thousand it seemed like.

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First of all, no "old growth" trees were removed. Buildings were in that spot several years ago that were removed (thereby preventing the possibilty of old growth anything); however, I agree that it was a sham that the park was razed. Bird poop was not the reason; I'm fairly certain we all know that. The park that existed there was not exactly used by a diverse population. The city is apparently attempting to rectify that -- not ideal, but more-or-less necessary. We need to deal with a greater problem (i.e. the homeless), but that particular park is not the end-all, be-all. Odd that the city would choose to raze, but I think that rehabilitation was prohibited due to faulty planning. Occasionally that happens (!) and we have to be able, as a city, to admit that and move on. I think this is such case.

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Do I sense some regional affectation in your comments?

When's the last time you saw any homeless people in New York?

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If they really wanted to get rid of the birds, not the homeless, they could have used any number of bird control products-- certainly not necessary to raze an entire park.

Though I can understand the desire to get rid of birds (they can carry over 60 diseases).

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I've been looking through a couple of years of old pictures and it seems that no, we don't hate trees, we're planting hundreds of them. Every new development has new trees and landscaping. I believe it will all begin to show nicely when they begin to mature. With downtown's face changing so drastically and so fast, I think we'll see the trees are very important to us. Urban foresters have made mistakes in the past, so the trees being planted now are much more resilient and will not overgrow as some have. Birmingham's downtown is a beautiful example of using trees, but now, they've become so oversized that something has to be done.

Oh, btw, Tom, are you local? I knew a Tom Starling in high school. Send me a message and let me know where you went to high school if you don't mind.

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I've been looking through a couple of years of old pictures and it seems that no, we don't hate trees, we're planting hundreds of them. Every new development has new trees and landscaping. I believe it will all begin to show nicely when they begin to mature. With downtown's face changing so drastically and so fast, I think we'll see the trees are very important to us. Urban foresters have made mistakes in the past, so the trees being planted now are much more resilient and will not overgrow as some have. Birmingham's downtown is a beautiful example of using trees, but now, they've become so oversized that something has to be done.

Oh, btw, Tom, are you local? I knew a Tom Starling in high school. Send me a message and let me know where you went to high school if you don't mind.

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