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Ban On Paper/Cardboard From Nonrecyclable Refuse

Trash Ban   27 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you support a city-wide effort to ban paper/cardboard from your nonrecyclable bin?

    • Yes
      14
    • No
      9
    • Dont Know
      4
    • Dont Care
      0

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15 posts in this topic

I read an article today in the NY Times about Seattle and their recycling successes and I thought that it would be pretty simple for us to implement some of the same policies, especially considering that we already have much of the infrastructure already in place. We can recycle all kinds of glass, cardboard, different kinds of paper, plastics 1-7 (beating L.A. to the punch since they use to collect only certain kinds up until about a month or two ago!), etc. It seems all we would really need to do to implement this is to have the will and let our local political leaders know. The link to the article is below; it is pretty fascinating and is really worth a read if you are into recycling. Anyways, what do you think? Could we start with a ban on paper/cardboard being thrown away in curbside pick-up and only pick it up if it were in the recycle bin? Would it be possible/feasible/cost-effective? One final note, according to the article, Seattle residents “take pride that their weekly nonrecyclable output fits in a container no larger than the average countertop microwave!” Why not GR?

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/10/us/10recycle.html

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I read the NY Times story, and yes, I would support the ban, but...once the stuff is in the opaque city trash bag, who's going to know? Is someone going to open each individual city (or city-tagged) trash bag and root among the stinky stuff looking for paper and cardboard? How would it work?

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I read the NY Times story, and yes, I would support the ban, but...once the stuff is in the opaque city trash bag, who's going to know? Is someone going to open each individual city (or city-tagged) trash bag and root among the stinky stuff looking for paper and cardboard? How would it work?

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Of course, just this morning I watched a City sanitation employee empty my wheely cart in the garbage truck, then pick a cardboard box filled with packing paper, smaller cardboard boxes, and newspaper that I set next to the cart, and toss it into the truck with the rest of the garbage. (Box was too big to fit in a blue recycle tote, so I set it out by itself.)

So much for separating it out...

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I understand Zen. The article was not too specific, but it would be great to know how Seattle makes it work because from the statistics that were given they seem to make it feasible.

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I understand Zen. The article was not too specific, but it would be great to know how Seattle makes it work because from the statistics that were given they seem to make it feasible.

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I voted 'no' because I think the first step is making it easier to recycle in the City. Curbside recycling service is not available to downtown apartments, condos or businesses, so you have to go out of your way to recycle things like glass, paper, plastic, etc.

http://www.ci.grand-rapids.mi.us/index.pl?page_id=431:

Welcome to the City of Grand Rapids "Wastenot" residential curbside recycling program!

City residents may participate in this free program. The program is available to residents living in single or multi-family households adjacent to public streets (no apartments, private condo complexes, or businesses please).

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I would support some kind of beefier recycling program than what we have now. It would not be too hard to separate papers metals and plastics from food garbage.

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Am I the only one who think this is completely insane? Do we really need some governing entity telling me what to do with my garbage? What's next, a limit on how many miles I can drive my car each day to curb global warming? A ban on buying more than two candy bars at a time to prevent obesity? I'm all for recycling and being environmentally responsible, but I draw the line at allowing the government telling me what to do with my garbage. The answer to all of our problems always seems to be more government.

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Am I the only one who think this is completely insane? Do we really need some governing entity telling me what to do with my garbage? What's next, a limit on how many miles I can drive my car each day to curb global warming? A ban on buying more than two candy bars at a time to prevent obesity? I'm all for recycling and being environmentally responsible, but I draw the line at allowing the government telling me what to do with my garbage. The answer to all of our problems always seems to be more government.

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Lest we not forget DDT and other nasty chemical bans.

BTW: Look above Karen, your second typo!! :lol:

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Am I the only one who think this is completely insane? Do we really need some governing entity telling me what to do with my garbage? What's next, a limit on how many miles I can drive my car each day to curb global warming? A ban on buying more than two candy bars at a time to prevent obesity? I'm all for recycling and being environmentally responsible, but I draw the line at allowing the government telling me what to do with my garbage. The answer to all of our problems always seems to be more government.

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