Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

turboturtle

Little Rock's Creative Class

53 posts in this topic

Has anyone read Richard Florida's, "The Rise of the Creative Class?" I haven't read it yet, but I have the book. It is on my list to read next.

I keep coming across him and recently got a RSS subscription to his site.

A fair amount of his blog posts intrigue me and are topics that we don't discuss much here. Because economic development is a major component of what the Creative Class theory is about, I believe this topic is relevant to the forum.

Any Creative Classers out there? Share your thoughts and ideas, particularly as they relate to The Rock. Even if you think it is a bunch of hooey, share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


The first issue of the now defunct Little Rock Monthly had a cover story about this book because Little Rock was ranked very high on the list for medium sized cities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The first issue of the now defunct Little Rock Monthly had a cover story about this book because Little Rock was ranked very high on the list for medium sized cities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The first issue of the now defunct Little Rock Monthly had a cover story about this book because Little Rock was ranked very high on the list for medium sized cities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wasn't able to return anything with google... It would be nice to get a summary of the article or the article posted here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a link to Richard Florida's The Creative Class Exchange blog about Today's young workers.

Little Rock is not included in the post. However, there has been discussion about Dallas in the "Little Rock versus Larger Cities" sub-forum. Drilling down into the stats from the link above, it shows Dallas with an rank of #5 in percentage (18.44%) of young workers (ages 25-34) of entire population. Dallas ranked #9 in the list of total population and #6 in the list of population size of 25-34 year olds (young workers). What is more interesting is between 2000 and 2006, Dallas lost a percentage (-6.76%) of this young worker population. Conversely, Austin gained +5.27% during the same time period. Austin is #1 in percentage (20.35%) of young workers of entire population.

For more comparison, Memphis is at 13.67% percentage of young workers of entire population. Between 2000 and 2006, Memphis lost -14.17% of there population of young workers.

So what does this mean for Little Rock, who knows? My gut tells me Little Rock has probably decreased over the 2000 to 2006 time period. But, I bet the percentage drop is more similar to Dallas than Memphis. I am also guessing the Rogers(NWA) has seen an increase.

I'd like to see an age distribution across 25 to 34 for Little Rock. From 2000 to 2006, I'd expect to see I larger decrease in the 25 to 29 segment and some stability (maybe even a slight increase) in the 30 to 34 segment.

Anyone want to speculate on what Little Rock has that would attract young workers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I believe you'll find that the Fayetteville on that list is Fayetteville, North Carolina, not the Arkansas version. :shades:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fayetteville, NC and Fayetteville, AR are both on the list. AR is #57, NC is #59

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It will be interesting to see where LR stands in 2010, if Florida remakes this list. Many of the metros at the top of the under 500,000 list now have populations above that threshold and might knock LR down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The greated threat to future growth and success in Little Rock, AR and the entire state is "Arkansas Drops To No. 50 Of Residents With 4-Year Degrees." The bottom five were Louisiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas and West Virginia.

The opportunity costs incurred when start-ups and established companies chose not to locate in the State are tremendous. Based on my observations, that the majority of my academic and socio-economic peers left Little Rock after high school and have not returned, I'm convinced Little Rock suffers from this today.

Bill Halter's Lottery amendment seems like a chance to begin to turn this around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The greated threat to future growth and success in Little Rock, AR and the entire state is "Arkansas Drops To No. 50 Of Residents With 4-Year Degrees." The bottom five were Louisiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas and West Virginia.

The opportunity costs incurred when start-ups and established companies chose not to locate in the State are tremendous. Based on my observations, that the majority of my academic and socio-economic peers left Little Rock after high school and have not returned, I'm convinced Little Rock suffers from this today.

Bill Halter's Lottery amendment seems like a chance to begin to turn this around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Bill Halter's Lottery amendment seems like a chance to begin to turn this around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The greated threat to future growth and success in Little Rock, AR and the entire state is "Arkansas Drops To No. 50 Of Residents With 4-Year Degrees." The bottom five were Louisiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas and West Virginia.

The opportunity costs incurred when start-ups and established companies chose not to locate in the State are tremendous. Based on my observations, that the majority of my academic and socio-economic peers left Little Rock after high school and have not returned, I'm convinced Little Rock suffers from this today.

Bill Halter's Lottery amendment seems like a chance to begin to turn this around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The greated threat to future growth and success in Little Rock, AR and the entire state is "Arkansas Drops To No. 50 Of Residents With 4-Year Degrees." The bottom five were Louisiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas and West Virginia.

The opportunity costs incurred when start-ups and established companies chose not to locate in the State are tremendous. Based on my observations, that the majority of my academic and socio-economic peers left Little Rock after high school and have not returned, I'm convinced Little Rock suffers from this today.

Bill Halter's Lottery amendment seems like a chance to begin to turn this around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No I'm really not kidding. I plan to vote for the lottery.

It is unlikely that I'll ever participate in it. That, however, is not a moral judgment. The low likelihood of my playing the lottery is my choice based on my adversity to some risks. I never went to Oaklawn until I was 35. Also, the one time I went to Las Vegas, I played the nickel slots with a roll of nickels. When I was done, I called it quits.

If someone wants to play the lottery, and there is a legislated allocation of funds for Arkansans to attend college, whose principle obstacle to attending a 2 or 4 year Arkansas college or university is the cost of tuition and books, then I'm behind it. Many states have already exercised this vehicle. Lotteries are a last resort. And Arkansas is dead last in percentage of population with 4 year degrees.

An alternative would be to increase state taxes for the purpose of funding more scholarships. Is this preferred? Who is advocating this alternative? OR, maybe some Arkansas are content with the status quo. That's not me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In fact, Arkansas has one of the HIGHEST percentage of college enrollment in the country. The problem is that most do not end up finishing their degree, attributed to a variety of reasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Out of my graduating class of 89 students, only 2 people finished their degree, myself included. I am not sure why most people don't finish their degree. I knew some who partied away their college education, some who had kids and dropped out, some who transferred out of state, but many people I knew in college just left and I never saw them again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We do a lot of higher education work, a good portion at 2-year institutions. I've had more than one administrator state that a common problem is that people of modest means qualify for student loans or financial aid, but when push comes to shove, decide to use their stipend on a truck payment (etc.) instead of books, tuition, etc. Really short-sighted stuff - a sad state of mind for more and more Americans, who place instant gratification above a long term investment in themselves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We do a lot of higher education work, a good portion at 2-year institutions. I've had more than one administrator state that a common problem is that people of modest means qualify for student loans or financial aid, but when push comes to shove, decide to use their stipend on a truck payment (etc.) instead of books, tuition, etc. Really short-sighted stuff - a sad state of mind for more and more Americans, who place instant gratification above a long term investment in themselves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe one of problems with education in the state has to do with its perception by the public. You go to most high schools in the state and sports are more important than a quality education. I doubt if any high school in the state spends more money each year on their library than their sports. The results of this view point is there are more important things in life than an education. Just think if the money spent on athletics in the public schools was redirected into a robotics program. The schools could compete against each other and a final tournament could be held each year. What do you think the perception from the outside would would be if Arkansas spent $100 million dollars on something like this instead of athletics? This is just one example of what could be done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.