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Neo

Do you compost?

Do you compost?   15 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you compost?

    • Yes
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    • No
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I'm curious as to how many of you compost? For those of you who aren't familiar with the process, composting is the process of combining organic food scraps and other organic material (dirt, leaves, grass clippings, etc.) over the course of 12-18 months with an end result being a nutrition rich soil for your garden, plants, etc.

My wife and I have been composting for almost two years so far and have a noticeable decrease in the amount of trash we produce by doing so, not to mention that it is excellent for the environment and free to do so. There are a couple of different ways to go about the process. Our property backs up to a floodplain with woods and a creek thus we have room to keep several compost piles all in different stages of completion. We routinely go out to turn the piles and add a bit of water. Some may not be fortunate enough to have space to do it in this manner so in those cases you can purchase a compost bin with various degrees of fanciness and size.

*For more information on composting please visit the following (excellent) site: http://www.p2pays.org/compost/

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I do not compost, however i am currently looking into it.

I live in an apartment, but i do realize that i can still compost. I am not yet for several reasons.

1. Trying to figure out the best way to do it with VERY limited space.

2. Just recently started recycling, and my girlfriend is still warming up to it, so i need more time before dropping this bombshell on her.

3. The benefits of such(fresh mulch) are not as useful to me as it would be if i had a yard. I do have patio plants, but these require little soil.

4. (An extension of #1) I'm not sure which method would be best for me, and whether i should do it entirely indoors, entirely outdoors, or some of both.

Which brings me to a question. These "mechanical" composting machines...are they good or not? Do they work? Do they smell? Honestly, i would feel a little silly if i used a machine which consumes electricity to try and reduce my waste. However, they promise that it is a minimal amount of wattage and if this was the easiest/most sanitary method of doing so in my 600sq ft i might consider it.

Any thoughts Neo?

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I'm curious as to how many of you compost? For those of you who aren't familiar with the process, composting is the process of combining organic food scraps and other organic material (dirt, leaves, grass clippings, etc.) over the course of 12-18 months with an end result being a nutrition rich soil for your garden, plants, etc.

My wife and I have been composting for almost two years so far and have a noticable decrease in the amount of trash we produce by doing so, not to mention that it is excellent for the environment and free to do so. There are a couple of different ways to go about the process. Our property backs up to a floodplain with woods and a creek thus we have room to keep several compost piles all in different stages of completion. We routinely go out to turn the piles and add a bit of water. Some may not be fortunate enough to have space to do it in this manner so in those cases you can purchase a compost bin with various degrees of fanciness and size.

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Which brings me to a question. These "mechanical" composting machines...are they good or not? Do they work? Do they smell? Honestly, i would feel a little silly if i used a machine which consumes electricity to try and reduce my waste. However, they promise that it is a minimal amount of wattage and if this was the easiest/most sanitary method of doing so in my 600sq ft i might consider it.

Any thoughts Neo?

Well, I can sympathize with you and your cramped space as I once lived in a 650 sq. ft. apartment in Chicago. If you have minimal requirements for composting I would recommend a mini composter to put out on your balcony (if you have one). I wouldn't compost in the house for various reasons but I believe smell would be an issue for you indoors. I honestly don't know of any powered composting machines but then again I don't use a machine so I haven't done a lot of research. I manually compost mine in several piles at the back of our property. I believe though that most composting bins simply have a mechanical crank to turn it.

The real benefit from this is that you're not purchasing good soil for your plants that has been packaged using plastic and delivered on a large diesel consuming truck. It reduces your carbon footprint a little (minimal for one person/family but imagine if everyone did it!).

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I mulch up my yard waste, but haven't been composting food scraps.

I'm eager to begin vermicomposting, I just have to commit to create the space to do it. I have plenty of yard, but don't want to leave the worms exposed to temperature extremes. So, I have to clear out some space in the small utility/storage room I have attached to the back of my house.

Unfortunately, that means I have to build a small shed.

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Vermicomposting (with red worms, not earthworms) is a great way to compost kitchen scraps indoors without odors - do a search and you'll find dozens of appropriate containers and/or instructions on creating one as well as sources for the right species of worm.

This is the right time of year for those of us with yards (and trees) to build up a stock of carbon (leaves) to be mixed with nitrogen (grass clippings) in the spring. I make cylinders of that green plastic/nylon fencing and store my leaves there, some breakdown will occur, but very slowly until you heat it up with nitrogen. I've tried chicken/hog wire before, but the tack welds break after a season or so and you have to buy more.

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FYI, another thing that is great for plants is fire ash. My parents put their ashes around the base of their tree's, and the tree's love it. I sometimes scatter my ashes on the tree's around my apartment building. Sooner or later I fear that I'm going to have to explain to the police that it is NOT anthrax.

As far as composting in an apartment, do any of you guys have any good idea's about something i could do under my sink? Is vermicomposting possible to do indoors on a small scale or does it require a large bin? I do have a small balcony, but it is already pretty cramped with a chair, some firewood, and my recycling bin. Not much room for a large bin. Also, just curious. When you guys transfer your food scraps, do you do it on demand or do you have some sort of temporary scrap bin?

Also, if i do begin vermicomposting do i also need natural product (leaves,grass) to make the process happen?

Imaging seeing your neighbor in an apartment outside collecting leaves of the ground and then dumping ash around the trees. Ha!

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Also, just curious. When you guys transfer your food scraps, do you do it on demand or do you have some sort of temporary scrap bin?

We bought a cheap plastic bowl (think small popcorn bowl or something along those lines) from Target that we leave sitting in the corner of the kitchen. When it gets full (which happens fairly quickly since we cook our own food during the work week) we just take it out back and dump it then stick it in the dishwasher to get sanitized (dishwasher also runs frequently because we cook so much of our own food). Depending on what you put in the bowl it may need to be taken out before it is full though, some things begin to rot faster than others.

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FYI, another thing that is great for plants is fire ash. My parents put their ashes around the base of their tree's, and the tree's love it. I sometimes scatter my ashes on the tree's around my apartment building. Sooner or later I fear that I'm going to have to explain to the police that it is NOT anthrax.

As far as composting in an apartment, do any of you guys have any good idea's about something i could do under my sink? Is vermicomposting possible to do indoors on a small scale or does it require a large bin? I do have a small balcony, but it is already pretty cramped with a chair, some firewood, and my recycling bin. Not much room for a large bin. Also, just curious. When you guys transfer your food scraps, do you do it on demand or do you have some sort of temporary scrap bin?

Also, if i do begin vermicomposting do i also need natural product (leaves,grass) to make the process happen?

Imaging seeing your neighbor in an apartment outside collecting leaves of the ground and then dumping ash around the trees. Ha!

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Vermicomposting is possible indoors in a small space. The worm population adjusts to the space and food available, and you can buy or make your own small-scale setup that would fit under a sink or in a closet. The only reason I haven't done that myself is that my wife won't let me have worms in the house.

Getting started seems pretty easy. I've exchanged emails and visited a live demo with a woman here who's been doing it for years. She starts with a bed of moist shredded newspaper for her worms, and then starts adding scraps.

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This Wikipedia article can answer most of your vermicomposting questions. If you buy a bin and/or worms, they will usually come with pretty extensive instructions.

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So is there much smell? I guess you do not need leaves and such.

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I ran across this nifty product today:

http://naturemill.com/pro.html

view_proRed.jpg

This is a no hassle way of turning your scraps into usable compost as it takes care of the temperature, mixing, etc. and even takes the bad odor out! It is a little pricey but considering how many features it has and that it is perfect for anyone in an apartment, high-rise, etc. this is the way to go!

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Vermicomposting is possible indoors in a small space. The worm population adjusts to the space and food available, and you can buy or make your own small-scale setup that would fit under a sink or in a closet. The only reason I haven't done that myself is that my wife won't let me have worms in the house.

Getting started seems pretty easy. I've exchanged emails and visited a live demo with a woman here who's been doing it for years. She starts with a bed of moist shredded newspaper for her worms, and then starts adding scraps.

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I like that idea. Do you have to maintain a minium temperature?

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