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gs3

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I think it would be good for it to run through the upstate. I'd love to have a good highway to go to Augusta on. G-man said he emailed G'ville news last night and there is an article now.

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I think it would be good for it to run through the upstate. I'd love to have a good highway to go to Augusta on. G-man said he emailed G'ville news last night and there is an article now.

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I would love to have an interstate to Savannah. Would make going south such a direct shot.

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I hope our city and county leaders (as well as the GADC) really push for the route to run through Greenville. In terms of long-range planning, it would be awful if this misses us and instead goes through Northern Georgia or Clinton. If the powers-that-be will just look at population centers and think about development in the coming years, it only makes sense to route it through Greenville. We deserve a north-south interstate (since I-26 bypassed us many years ago) and this seems very important for Greenville's long-term growth.

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We deserve a north-south interstate (since I-26 bypassed us many years ago) and this seems very important for Greenville's long-term growth.

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South Carolina should have followed the Dallas/Ft.Worth lead or Minneapolis/St.Paul lead and split I-26 to go through both cities, the way I-35 does in the two mentioned metros. I-26E and I26W. Not being a native, I don't know the history of I-26, but I'm sure politics were involved.

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Why not connect Savannah to Asheville via Greenville and Augusta? That'd be a nice route to have for many reasons.

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Here is an article in The State today.

One of the route alternatives includes part of South Carolina, possible ending in Clinton or Greenville.

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I just can't help but think that this would end up hurting the port of Charleston, while substantially benefitting Savannah's port--which has already jumped ahead of Charleston's.

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South Carolina should have followed the Dallas/Ft.Worth lead or Minneapolis/St.Paul lead and split I-26 to go through both cities, the way I-35 does in the two mentioned metros. I-26E and I26W. Not being a native, I don't know the history of I-26, but I'm sure politics were involved.

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To me, this is about more than connecting Greenville to Asheville better. While that would be great, I view the need for a north-south interstate through Greenville as essential for the long-term growth of Greenville. It is growing at a good pace now, and being better connected with other (new) Southeastern metros will be more important in the years to come. Routing it through Northern Georgia or Clinton would be a huge mistake, IMO. Why does Clinton need a third interstate, anyway?

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To me, this is about more than connecting Greenville to Asheville better. While that would be great, I view the need for a north-south interstate through Greenville as essential for the long-term growth of Greenville. It is growing at a good pace now, and being better connected with other (new) Southeastern metros will be more important in the years to come. Routing it through Northern Georgia or Clinton would be a huge mistake, IMO. Why does Clinton need a third interstate, anyway?

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I just can't help but think that this would end up hurting the port of Charleston, while substantially benefitting Savannah's port--which has already jumped ahead of Charleston's.

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I just can't help but think that this would end up hurting the port of Charleston, while substantially benefitting Savannah's port--which has already jumped ahead of Charleston's.

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I think Roger Milliken's influence had something to do with that, similar to how GSP was built in Sptbg. I think it was originally supposed to be Spartanburg's airport, while Gville's was supposed to be GMU, but they decided to make a joint one instead. Milliken had a lot of pull and influence in those days I hear, sort of your "Donald Trump of Sptbg" if you will. I think when I-26 was built, many thought (and lobbied) that Sptbg would become the primary upstate city.

Gville could use a N/S route, and the upgrade of US 25 by far makes the most sense. Upgrade it from Augusta to Greenwood to Gville, following the loop through the Westside. And a new interstate may be the only way the westside will ever "catch up" to the eastside.

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GSP was indeed Miliken's pet project at the time, but its location was, as I understand it, largely due to it being the easiest location to assemble the amount of land needed for a major airport. Milliken saw the benefit of having both cities share one airport, rather than compete with each other with two.

Now, as for 26, this is the first time I have heard that. It sounds true, but I don't know the details behind I-26's development. I have always assumed it was because the Saluda Grade was the most logical place to make the ascent up into the mountains (its the only place that rail goes from the Upstate to the mountains), and the Spartanburg route just made more sense. But like I said, I've never heard a good explanation as to why spartanburg was chosen over Greenville, so you may indeed be right. If you have any sources to back that up I would be most interested to read them!

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^ Bingo, besides Spartanburg being the railroad hub for the Upstate, with direct access to Asheville through Howards Gap, the primary highway in the early to mid 1900's from Columbia to Asheville was through Spartanburg. Back then, interstate highways often followed US highways, as is the case with I-85 & US 29 & I-26 & US 76.

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I think Roger Milliken's influence had something to do with that, similar to how GSP was built in Sptbg. I think it was originally supposed to be Spartanburg's airport, while Gville's was supposed to be GMU, but they decided to make a joint one instead. Milliken had a lot of pull and influence in those days I hear, sort of your "Donald Trump of Sptbg" if you will. I think when I-26 was built, many thought (and lobbied) that Sptbg would become the primary upstate city.

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Its still way early on this one. They will have to do studies and route proposals and what not. I'm still a bit skeptical about the whole thing. But we'll wait and see.

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I'm afraid that our state government will find some way to screw this up, either by routing it through Clinton instead of Greenville or by killing it altogether. But I'm keeping my fingers crossed and trying to remain cautiously optimistic.

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