nyxmike

Triangle Statistics

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I know Wikipedia is not the most accurate source of information, but I noticed that they listed the 2007 population of Wake County as having 950,000+ people and Johnston County as 251,000. Is that right? They both would of had to add atleast 100,000 people in order to reach that amount in 1-2 years.

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I know Wikipedia is not the most accurate source of information, but I noticed that they listed the 2007 population of Wake County as having 950,000+ people and Johnston County as 251,000. Is that right? They both would of had to add atleast 100,000 people in order to reach that amount in 1-2 years.

Wake county is 817,429 as of July 2007, also as per Wiki. I think that you may be referring to the Raleigh-Cary metro are which according to Wiki is 994,551. Also, the Combined Statistical Areas is 1,565,223. Maybe you where seeing/thinking of one of these? :)

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Wake county is 817,429 as of July 2007, also as per Wiki. I think that you may be referring to the Raleigh-Cary metro are which according to Wiki is 994,551. Also, the Combined Statistical Areas is 1,565,223. Maybe you where seeing/thinking of one of these? :)

The Raleigh-Cary metro is a farce. Raleigh and Durham touch, but their treated like two separate metros. I hope this is fixed in the next Census.

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The Raleigh-Cary metro is a farce. Raleigh and Durham touch, but their treated like two separate metros. I hope this is fixed in the next Census.

Raleigh-Cary is the MSA(Metropolitan Statistical Area), split off from Durham and Chapel Hill in the last census because of their respective sizes. Raleigh-Durham-Cary is the CSA (Combined Statistical Area), a combination of the Raleigh-Cary MSA, Durham(incl.CH) MSA, and Dunn MicroSA(Micropolitan Statistical Area).

So the Raleigh-Durham-Cary CSA serves the purpose of the old MSA, from a grouping perspective, with a different statistical perspective.

MSA -from Census.gov

Edited by Captain Awesome

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The N&O reported today that Raleigh has just edged out Minneapolis to become the 49th largest city in the U.S. At this rate we will be in the top 35 within 5-10 years.

N&O Article

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My friend in Raleigh sent me the article from your local news station earlier this evening. The first thing I noticed was that the estimate was from Raleigh's Growth Management Division. I liked how they used their numbers against the latest census estimates for Minneapolis. We all now the Census Bureau's estimates have been historically inaccurate. For example, they were off by ten of thousands for Minneapolis and St. Paul during the 90s. If Raleigh's Growth Management Division would have used the estimates released by the Metropolitan Council then there would not have been a story. According to the Met. Council, Minneapolis has a population of 387,970 (as of 2006). They also failed to mention the size of these cities. Raleigh at 114.6 sq. mi. is bigger than Minneapolis and St. Paul combined (107.7 sq. mi.).

Whatever the case, it is nice to see a central city thriving so congrats. to Raleigh for its steady (and hopefully smart) growth.

Edited by Minneapolitan

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My friend in Raleigh sent me the article from your local news station earlier this evening. The first thing I noticed was that the estimate was from Raleigh's Growth Management Division. I liked how they used their numbers against the latest census estimates for Minneapolis. We all now the Census Bureau's estimates have been historically inaccurate. For example, they were off by ten of thousands for Minneapolis and St. Paul during the 90s. If Raleigh's Growth Management Division would have used the estimates released by the Metropolitan Council then there would not have been a story. According to the Met. Council, Minneapolis has a population of 387,970 (as of 2006). They also failed to mention the size of these cities. Raleigh at 114.6 sq. mi. is bigger than Minneapolis and St. Paul combined (107.7 sq. mi.).

Whatever the case, it is nice to see a central city thriving so congrats. to Raleigh for its steady (and hopefully smart) growth.

I think the only reason they did that is because the census estimates are good only through July 1, 2006--a year behind. I kknow that our fairly new planning directior is trying to instill the notion that while not a big city, that we need to think bigger. FWIW, Minneapolis-St. Paul is clearly on another level from the Triangle area, and Raleigh certainly benefits from liberal annexation laws, that perhaps Minneapolis does not. Clearly, Minneapolis would feel like much more of a city than Raleigh... much more urban, while Raleigh is mostly suburban. Like Dallas-Fort Worth, all three areas are thriving poly-centric regions, each in their own way.

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I think the only reason they did that is because the census estimates are good only through July 1, 2006--a year behind. I kknow that our fairly new planning directior is trying to instill the notion that while not a big city, that we need to think bigger. FWIW, Minneapolis-St. Paul is clearly on another level from the Triangle area, and Raleigh certainly benefits from liberal annexation laws, that perhaps Minneapolis does not. Clearly, Minneapolis would feel like much more of a city than Raleigh... much more urban, while Raleigh is mostly suburban. Like Dallas-Fort Worth, all three areas are thriving poly-centric regions, each in their own way.

When was the last time Raleigh took advantage of the annexation process?

I think the last time Minneapolis was able to annex was 1920.

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When was the last time Raleigh took advantage of the annexation process?

I think the last time Minneapolis was able to annex was 1920.

This year. Raleigh annexes quite often throughout the year. IIRC, Raleigh annexed around 24 different times last year. Many of our annexations here are done so at the request of the property owners and developers, who want city services and city coucil almost always "rubber stamps" them. One of the big problems here is there is still plenty of undeveloped land on the outskirts of the city, so people go and build out there and then want the city to annex it. As undeveloped land becomes scarce and city boundaries grow together, this will likely slow down.

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^^ yeah, Raleigh annexes every year both forced and by request.

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Here are populations and growth rates for Triangle counties from 2000 to 2007, according to the US Census. The first number is the July 2007 estimated population, the second number is the 2000-2007 growth rate.

Durham: 256,500, 14.9 percent (2.5 percent in one year)

Orange: 124,313, 7.6 percent (1.8 percent in one year)

Chatham: 61,455, 24.6 percent (2.7 percent in one year)

Johnston: 157,437, 29.2 percent (4.3 percent in one year)

Wake: 832,970, 32.7 percent (4.9 percent in one year)

Triangle total: 1.4 million, 34 percent (4 percent in one year)

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Here are populations and growth rates for Triangle counties from 2000 to 2007, according to the US Census. The first number is the July 2007 estimated population, the second number is the 2000-2007 growth rate.

Durham: 256,500, 14.9 percent (2.5 percent in one year)

Orange: 124,313, 7.6 percent (1.8 percent in one year)

Chatham: 61,455, 24.6 percent (2.7 percent in one year)

Johnston: 157,437, 29.2 percent (4.3 percent in one year)

Wake: 832,970, 32.7 percent (4.9 percent in one year)

Triangle total: 1.4 million, 34 percent (4 percent in one year)

So how does the triangle grow 34% when none of the constituent counties grew by that much?

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Lies, damn lies, and statistics. :)

I think the "34% Triangle growth" comes from the diference between adding up the population of the member counties in 2000 and 2007 and comparing those two numbers.

Wake County's growth is "slower" than 34 percent, but the population increase there is enough to bump up Triangle's overall growth rate.

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So how does the triangle grow 34% when none of the constituent counties grew by that much?

Likely because the two MSAs that form the Triangle include portions of counties, or census tracts, that may have a proportionally higher growth rate than the entire county growth rate. Examples might include: NW Johnston, NE Chatham, S Granville, SW Franklin, etc.

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The N&O has different numbers than what DCMetro posted.

Here are July 2007 populations for Triangle counties and the percentage increase from 2000 to 2007.

Orange 124,313 7.6 percent

Durham 256,500 14.9 percent

Franklin 57,222 21 percent

Chatham 61,455 24.6 percent

Johnston 157,437 29.2 percent

Wake 832,970 32.7 percent

Triangle1.5 million 25.7 percent

Don't count on the census website I suppose, if thats where DC's triangle number came from...the other numbers match.

Edited by Jones133

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The N&O has different numbers than what DCMetro posted.

Here are July 2007 populations for Triangle counties and the percentage increase from 2000 to 2007.

Orange 124,313 7.6 percent

Durham 256,500 14.9 percent

Franklin 57,222 21 percent

Chatham 61,455 24.6 percent

Johnston 157,437 29.2 percent

Wake 832,970 32.7 percent

Triangle1.5 million 25.7 percent

Don't count on the census website I suppose, if thats where DC's triangle number came from...the other numbers match.

What about the other counties in the Triangle? Those are only five counties. That means our CSA (Triangle) is more like 1.6-1.7 million.

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Wow to think in the 20 years NC could possibly have two metros with 2mil. I am sure the Triad will be pushing that limit also.

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Wow to think in the 20 years NC could possibly have two metros with 2mil. I am sure the Triad will be pushing that limit also.

Charlotte is really around 1.6, close to 1.7 million. The 2 million+ figure is misleading (15 counties). It includes counties in SC and many here in NC.

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QUOTE (Jones133 @ Mar 21 2008, 05:34 PM)

The N&O has different numbers than what DCMetro posted.

Here are July 2007 populations for Triangle counties and the percentage increase from 2000 to 2007.

Orange 124,313 7.6 percent

Durham 256,500 14.9 percent

Franklin 57,222 21 percent

Chatham 61,455 24.6 percent

Johnston 157,437 29.2 percent

Wake 832,970 32.7 percent

Triangle1.5 million 25.7 percent

Don't count on the census website I suppose, if thats where DC's triangle number came from...the other numbers match.

What about the other counties in the Triangle? Those are only five counties. That means our CSA (Triangle) is more like 1.6-1.7 million.

If you look at the list, it includes, (In no specific order):

#1 Orange

#2 Durham

#3 Franklin

#4 Chatham

#5 Johnston

#6 Wake

Six counties! :)

Also, these are the primary counties for the CBSA! If you wanted to include all of the counties for the CBSA then don't forget Harnett,(it's only used when referring to the CBSA).

Now if you are referring to the MSA's then:

Raleigh MSA is Wake, Johnston, Franklin ONLY!

Durham MSA is Durham, Orange, Chatham ONLY!

Below is a quote from the Census dept. I hope that it helps! :)

Standard definitions of metropolitan areas were first issued in 1949 by the then Bureau of the Budget (predecessor of OMB), under the designation "standard metropolitan area" (SMA). The term was changed to "standard metropolitan statistical area" (SMSA) in 1959, and to "metropolitan statistical area" (MSA) in 1983. The term "metropolitan area" (MA) was adopted in 1990 and referred collectively to metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), consolidated metropolitan statistical areas (CMSAs), and primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSAs). The term "core based statistical area" (CBSA) became effective in 2000 and refers collectively to metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas.

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According to figures released today by the U.S. Census Bureau, Cary was the nation's fifth-fastest growing large city. It ranked just below hot spots such as the recovering New Orleans, North Las Vegas and Victorville, a suburb in southern California.

According to the census, Cary grew by 7.3 percent between mid-2006 and mid-2007. The town now has nearly 122,000 residents, up from about 95,000 in 2000.

Raleigh was the only other North Carolina city among the nation's fastest growing. It ranked 13th with 4.2 percent growth.

Rolesville, the fastest-growing town in the state, grew by nearly 29 percent. Cary's neighbor Holly Springs added nearly 12 percent.

Census: Cary back on Steroids

Edited by DCMetroRaleigh

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This article could go in any thread (I did not see a population thread)....estimates top 380,000 folks now....

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This article could go in any thread (I did not see a population thread)....estimates top 380,000 folks now....

Edited by DwnTwnRaleighGuy

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