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Triangle Statistics


nyxmike

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Below is a quote from the Census dept. I hope that it helps! :)

Standard definitions of metropolitan areas were first issued in 1949 by the then Bureau of the Budget (predecessor of OMB), under the designation "standard metropolitan area" (SMA). The term was changed to "standard metropolitan statistical area" (SMSA) in 1959, and to "metropolitan statistical area" (MSA) in 1983. The term "metropolitan area" (MA) was adopted in 1990 and referred collectively to metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), consolidated metropolitan statistical areas (CMSAs), and primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSAs). The term "core based statistical area" (CBSA) became effective in 2000 and refers collectively to metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas.

Among many other issues, the census bureau really needs to get their acronyms under control. They'll be flinging pseudopolitans, megapolitans, brachiopolitans, broncopolitans, neopolitans or neapolitans at us in no time. Where will it end?

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  • 2 weeks later...
So do I, although it can be argued that Charlotte and Atlanta's increasing vitality and buzz are in large part a byproduct of robust, unabashed hyperboosterism that seems to infect their citizenry.
I would say it is in large part due to Atlanta and Charlotte being the two largest CSAs in the southeast outside of Florida. At any rate, hats off to Raleigh for making the number one spot on growth!!! :thumbsup: This trend should continue in Raleigh thanks to the relatively low unemployment rate.
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I for one, care much more about the livability of my City as opposed to how it stacks up against the world.

:thumbsup:

Now, if we can begin to direct that growth in a sustainable pattern--something we have NOT historically done well here in the triangle--then I am all for squawking about how we are doing. Otherwise, I see most of these numbers as just adding to more of our regional problems... worsening water quality, auto-centric sprawl (future slums), traffic congestion, poor air quality, terrible bike & pedestrian accommodations, lack of affordable housing, neglected mass transit... So excuse me if I don't jump up & down for more of that.

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The Raleigh Downtowner is reporting that there are now over 280 street level shops, restaurants, and service oriented businesses operating in downtown with 96% of those businesses being independently owned and operated. They also reported that there were 111 condo units sold during the 4th quarter of 2008. Those numbers sound pretty good to me considering that only a couple years ago Meeker was saying there were over 150 street level businesses in downtown.

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Bizjournals posted an interesting article recently. According to their projections, Raleigh will remain the fastest growing metro through at least 2025. If true, this has huge implications for Raleigh as a city, and for future growth prospects in corporate relocations, developments, etc. We are already starting to see the impact, with the recent wave of HQ relocations. Exciting news to say the least!

Bizjournals Article

Edited by RALNATIVE
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Is Raleigh ready for that?

Our growth model has been one that depends on the jobs being upper-middle class ones. Our suburban growth model will crumble under the weight of modest salaries and poor planning on several levels....schools, transit, crime.....the early signs of all these things starting to lag beyond repair in certain parts of the city are starting to show....suburban ghetto is a term that will enter our lexicon more and more often I think.

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Our growth model has been one that depends on the jobs being upper-middle class ones. Our suburban growth model will crumble under the weight of modest salaries and poor planning on several levels....schools, transit, crime.....the early signs of all these things starting to lag beyond repair in certain parts of the city are starting to show....suburban ghetto is a term that will enter our lexicon more and more often I think.

Not sure that I completely agree with that. The key is to watch the movement of high-paying jobs. As we are seeing more and more jobs in manufacturing, agriculture, and other blue collar fields continue to leave the area (through layoffs, shutdowns, etc.), we are seeing at the same time more high tech and other white collar jobs come to the area. There has been a number of HQ relocations lately.

This has been a trend that has been increasing over the last several years. Competition for those higher paying jobs will cause more and more people to move to the area to take advantage of the "better salaries," not to mention the great opportunities that exist for higher education. These are the things that will keep Raleigh in a steady growth mode for the foreseeable future. Nothing that I have seen thusfar indicates to me that the suburbs will become "suburban ghettos" anytime soon. If anything the affluence of these places will continue to grow. Look at what's happening in towns like Knightdale and Wake Forest as proof of that.

Again, keep your eye on the movement of high-paying jobs. That will dictate what the future of any metro is likely to be in the future.

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What seems to be of utmost concern, at least to me, is the fact that these high-tech jobs--which are good for any economy, especially in these times--are locating to a suburban location in an already decentralized metro area. What plans are in place to at least connect RTP with downtown Raleigh by rail-based transit or BRT?

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It is clear that our amenities (parks, greenways, museums, symphonies, amusement parks, etc.) haven't kept up with our population growth. At some point, some of the highly-educated urbane people moving here with corporate relocations are going to start standing up and saying that the emperor has no clothes...many "old"cities with comparable populations have far superior cultural and recreational amenities...

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I just don't think there are nearly enough high paying jobs to account for a doubling of our population...ripple and trickle down effects included. Our plans and planning strategy to date assumes we will continue to have this crazy high per capita income, and like every economic bubble that has burst, this fantasy will burst too, and need to be accounted for in tax structure and associated planning at all levels. Basically that means you will need more money to provide more things that more people need...and these people won't average 60k a year. If your next 100k people average 40k a year salary, they still use the same amount of road space (maybe more since they likely have to commute farther from affordable areas). This scenario is occurring in all service sectors and will be the long term situation even after this economic crash is officially over. "sustainability". Our favorite or most hated nickel and dime word depending on your political party. Sustainability in cities means planning for realistic income scenarios...a piece of the puzzle often never discussed.

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I have emailed the City of Raleigh about my questions in regards to the difference between there numbers and the US Census.

The reply that I got was........

Each agency use different methods in determining their estimated population. The methodologies and data sources used differ, thus differences in the final population estimates.

I asked the State Demographer, Jennifer Song, to decipher why the City of Raleigh, the State and the Census Bureau may have differences in estimates.

Below is the (lengthy) explanation which will help to explain the differences in estimate outcomes.

Basically the Census Bureau starts with the 2000 Census housing unit count, and then they calculate the growth in the housing stock through July 2008. This is based primarily on building permits issued for Raleigh through December 2007. The building permit total is adjusted by a slight amount (98%) to account for permits issued that don

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  • 8 months later...

The Raleigh-Cary area has made the most impressive climb since 2000 in the population rankings of metropolitan areas, according to estimates released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Raleigh-Cary, which ranked 59th in 2000, is 49th in the new standings with a population of almost 1.13 million, up from 797,000 in 2000. Raleigh-Cary's rise of 10 places in nine years is the biggest gain registered by any metro in the current top 50.

My link

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The Raleigh-Cary metropolitan area population grew 2.9 percent from April 1, 2010, to July 1, 2011. That rate was the fifth highest nationwide. The estimated July 1, 2011 population of Raleigh-Cary MSA was 1,163,515, an increase of 26.218 from July 1, 2010. The 12-month growth rate was 2.3 percent. Raleigh-Cary had the 23rd highest numerical increase for that 12-month period, fifth highest growth rate. Raleigh-Cary is the 47th most populous MSA in the nation.

It is interesting to note that in April 2000, the old Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill MSA had an estimated 1,187,941 people. Hence, the newish Raleigh-Cary MSA is currently the size of the old Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill MSA in 2000. Incredible!

Edited by DCMetroRaleigh
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MSA Durham-Chapel Hill, consisting of Durham, Orange, Chatham and Person counties, grew at a 1.4 percent rate or 7,117 people from July 2010 to July 2011, to 512,979. It had the 59th largest growth rate, 61st largest numerical increase in the nation. It is the 102nd largest MSA in the United States.

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